XI. The Story of the White Pet, pp.199-202.

From Mrs. MacTavish, widow of the late minister of Kildalton, Islay.

 

THERE was a farmer before now who had a White Pet (sheep), and when Christmas was drawing near, he thought that he would kill the White Pet. The White Pet heard that, and he thought he would run away; and that is what he did.

He had not gone far when a bull met him. Said the bull to his,

“All hail! White Pet. Where art thou going?”

(Fàilte dhuitse! A’ Pheata bhàin. Càite am bheil thusa a’ dol?)

“I,” said the White Pet, “am going to seek my fortune. They were going to kill me for Christmas, and I thought I had better run away.”

(Tha mi a’ falbh a dh’ iarridh an fhortain. Bha iad a’ dol a m’ mharbhadh a dh’ ionnsuidh na Nollaig, agus smuaintich mi gum b’ fheàrr domh teicheadh.)

“It is better for me,” said the bull, “to go with thee, for they were going to do the very same with me.”

(S’ fheàrr domhsa falbh leat, oir bha iad a’ dol a dhianadh a leithid eile ormsa.)

“I am willing,” said the White Pet; “the larger the party the better the fun.”

(Tha mi toileach, mar is mò a’ chuideachd ‘sann is fheàrr ‘n làn-aidhir.)

They went forward till they fell in with a dog.

“All hail! White Pet,” said the dog.

(Fàilte dhuit! A’ Pheata bhàin.)

“All hail! Thou dog.”

(Fàilte dhuit! Fhé ‘choin.)

“Where art thou going?” said the dog.

(Càite ‘m bheil thu a’ dol?)

“I am running away, for I heard that they were threatening to kill me for Christmas.”

(Tha mi aig teicheadh bho ‘n a chuala mi gun robh iad a’ brath mo mharbhadh air sonn na Nollaig.)

“They were going to do the very same to me,” said the dog, “and I will go with you.”

(Bha iad a’ dol a dhianadh a leithid cheùdna ormsa. Falbh naidh mi leibh.)

“Come, then,” said the White Pet.

(Thig, mata.)

They went then, till a cat joined them.

“All hail! White Pet,” said the cat.

(Fàilte dhuit! A’ Pheata bhàin.)

“All hail! oh cat.”

(Fàilte dhuit fhé! ‘A Chait.)

“Where art thou going?” said the cat.

(Caite am bheil thu a’ dol?)

“I am going to seek my fortune,” said the White Pet, “because they were going to kill me at Christmas.”

(Tha mi a’ dol a dh’ iarridh an fhortain a chionn gu ‘n robh iad a’ dol am’ mharbhadh air an Nollaig.)

“They were talking about killing me too.,” said the cat, “and I had better go with you.”

(Bha iad aig iomradh air mise mharbhadh cuideachd. ‘S féarr dhomh falbh leibh.)

“Come on then,” said the White Pet.

(Thugainn mata.)

Then they went forward till a cock met them.

“All hail! White Pet,” said the cock.

(Fàilte dhuit! A’ Pheata bhàin.)

“All hail to thyself! oh cock,” said the White  Pet.

(Fàilte dhuit fhé! ‘A Coileach.)

“Where,” said the cock, “art thou going?”

(Caite am bheil thu a dol?)

“I,” said the White Pet, “am going (away), for they were threatening my death at Christmas. 

(Tha mi a’ falbh o ‘n a bha iad a mòidhadh mo mharbhadh aig an Nollaig.)

“They were going to kill me at the very same time,” said the cock, “and I will go with you.”

(Bha iad a’ dol am’ mharbhadh-sa aig an am cheudna. Theid mi leibh.)

“Come, then,” said the White Pet.

(Thig, mata.)

They went forward till they fell in with a goose.

“All hail! White Pet,” said the goose.

(Fàilte dhuit! A’ Pheata bhàin.)

“All hail to thyself! oh goose,” said the White Pet.

(Fàilte dhuit fhé! ‘A gèadh.)

“Where art thou going?” said the goose.

(Caite am bheil thu a dol?)

“I,” said the White Pet, “am running away because they were going to kill me at Christmas.”

(Tha mise a’ teichadh a chionn gu ‘n robh iad a dol am mharbhadh aig an Nollaig.)

“They were going to do that to me too,” said the goose, “and I will go with you.”

(Bha iad a dol a’ dhèanadh sin ormsa cuideachd. Falbhaidh mi leibh.)

The party went forward till the night was drawing onthem, and they saw a little light far away; and though far off, they were not long getting there. When they reached the house, they said to each other that they would look in at the window to see who was in the house, and they saw thieves counting money; and the White Pet said,

“Let every one of us call his own call. I will call my own call; and let the bull call his own call; let the dog call his own call; and the cat her own call; and the cock his own call; and the goose his own call.”

(Glaoidhidh na uile aon aguinn a ghlaodh féin. Glaoidhidh mise mo ghlaodh; agus glaoidhidh an Tarbh a ghlaodh fein; glaoidhidh an Cù a ghlaodh fein; agus an Cat a ghlaodh fein; agus an Coileach a ghlaedh fein; agus an Gèadh a ghlaodh féin.)

With that they gave out one shout – GAIRE! 

When the thieves heard the shouting that was without, they thought th mischief was there; and they fled out, and they went to a wood that was near them. When the White Pet and his company saw that the house was empty, they went in and they got the money that the thieves had been counting, and they divideed it amongst themselves; and then they thought that they would settle to rest. Said the White Pet,.

“Where wilt thou sleep tonight, oh bull?”

(Caite an caidil thus’ an nochd, a Tarbh?)

“I will sleep,” said the bull, “behind the door where I used” (to be). “Where wilt thou sleep thyself, White Pet?”

(Caidlidh mise cùl an doruis far an àbhaist domh. Caite an caidil thu fein, a Pheata bhàin?)

“I will sleep,” said the White Pet, “in the middle of the floor where I used” (to be). “Where wilt thou sleep, oh dog?” said the White Pet.

(Caidlidh mise bàn am meadhan an ùlair far an àbhaist domh. Caite an caidil thus’, a Choin?)

“I will sleep beside the fire where I used” (to be), said the dog.

(Caidlidh mise taobh an teine far an àbhaist domh.)

“Where wilt thou sleep, oh cat?”

(Caite an caidil thus’, a Chait?)

“I will sleep,” said the cat, “in the candle press, where I like to be.”

(Caidlidh mis’ ann am preas nan coinneal, far an toil leam a bhith.)

“Where wilt thou sleep, oh cock?” said the White Pet.

(Caite an caidil thus’, a Choilich?)

“I,” said the cock,  “will sleep on the rafters where I used” (to be).

(Caidlidh mise air an spàrr far an àbhaist domh.)

“Where wilt thou sleep, oh goose?”

(Caite an caidil thus a Gèadh?)

“I will sleep,” said the goose, “on the midden, where I was accustomed to be.”

(Caidlidh mise air an dùnan, far an robh mi cleachte ri bith.)

They were nto long settled to rest, when one of the thieves returned to look in to see if he could perceive if any one at all was in the house. All things were still, and he went on forward to the candle press for a candle, that he might kindle to make him a light; but when he put his hand in the box the cat thrust her claws into his hand, but he took a candle with him, and he tried to light it. Then the dog got up, and he stuck his tail into a pot of water that was beside the fire; he shook his tail and put out the candle. Then the thief thought that the mischief was in the house, and he fled; but when he was passing the White Pet, he gave him a blow; before he got past the bull, he gave him a kick; and the cock began to crow; and when he went out, the goose began to belabour him with his wings about the shanks. 

He went to the wood where his comrades were, as fast as was in his legs. They asked him how it had gone with him.

“It went,” said he, “but middling; when I went to the candle press, there was a man in it who thrust ten knives into my hand; and when I went to the fireside to light the candle, there was a big black man lying there, who was sprinkling water on it to put it out; and when I tried to go out, there was a big man in the middle of the floor, who gave me a shove; and another man behind the door who pushed me out; and there was a little brat on the loft calling out CUIR-ANEES-AN-SHAW-AY-S-FONI-MI-HAYN-DA – Send him up here and I’ll do for him; and there was a GREE-AS-ICH-E, shoemaker, out on the midden, belabouring me about the shanks with his apron. 

(Cha deachaidh ach meadhonach; an uair a chaidh mi gu preas nan coinneal bha fear ann a shàth deich sheanan ann am laimh, agus an uair a chaidh mi gu taobh an teine a lasadh na coinneal bha fear mor, dubh ‘na luidhe ann a bha spreadadh uisge urra ‘ga cuir as, agus an uair a thug mi làmh air dol amach bha fear mor am meadhan an urlair a thug utag domh, agus fear eil’ aig cùl an doruis a phut amach mi, agus bha ablach beag air an fharadh aig glaoidhich amach, CUIR AN NIOS AN SO E ‘S FOGHNAIDH MI FHEIN DHA, agus bha GRIASAICH amach air an dùnan ‘gam ghreadadh mu na casan le apran.)

When the thieves heard that, they did not return to seek their lot of money; and the White Pet and his comrades got it to themselves; and it kept them peaceably as long as they lived.

 

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