Curious Coincidences from the Scottish Press

[Newspaper Research Contents]    STRANGE COINCIDENCE. - We learn from a New York paper that Mr Alex. Grant, who was one of the survivors from the wreck of the Central America, has been no less than four times within the grasp of the watery element. It is somewhat remarkable that on two occasions he was … Continue reading Curious Coincidences from the Scottish Press

Ludibria Naturae from the 19th Century Scottish Press.

[Newspaper Research Contents]    Lusus Naturæ [Freak of Nature]. - Two cases of monstrous births among the lower animals have just been communicated to us, on the very best authority. The first of these is a kitten with two mouths, two noses, two rows of teeth, one eye in the centre of its forehead, and … Continue reading Ludibria Naturae from the 19th Century Scottish Press.

Traditions of the Old Tolbooth of Edinburgh, Saturday, September 21, 1833, pp.267-268.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] TRADITIONS OF THE OLD TOLBOOTH OF EDINBURGH.  [From Reekiana, by R. Chambers.]     CRIMINALS, notwithstanding every consideration of the meanness which characterises some crimes, and the wickedness and cruelty of others, are an interesting portion of mankind. The interest respecting them is not confined to the young ladies, who conceive that … Continue reading Traditions of the Old Tolbooth of Edinburgh, Saturday, September 21, 1833, pp.267-268.

Hughie at the Smiddy – A Dramatic Idyll – Part II., pp.90-95.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] Smith as before. Later evening.  SMITH. HUGH. THREE PLOUGHMAN.  Outside at half-door, A TALL STRANGER, with a half-ell beard, leading a Saddle-horse.  -  Tall Stranger - Who owns this hole? Holloa there - you!  Blacksmith or blackguard!  Smith - What’s ado?  Hugh - It’s him! it’s Geordie!  Tall St. - Horse … Continue reading Hughie at the Smiddy – A Dramatic Idyll – Part II., pp.90-95.

Hughie at the Smiddy – A Dramatic Idyll – Part I., pp.83-89.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Ille terrarum mihi præter omnes  Angulus ridet.” - CAR. II., 6.  The Smithy - Evening.  SMITH. THREE PLOUGHMEN. Enter HUGH.  -  PART I.  Hugh - Noo, billies, ken ye what’s the steer?  1st Ploughman - Dave’s listed.  2nd Ploughman - Lowrie’s on the beer.  3rd Ploughman - Nick’s cut his throat.  … Continue reading Hughie at the Smiddy – A Dramatic Idyll – Part I., pp.83-89.

Hughie Upon Human Conduct, pp.81-82.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Memento... moriture Delli!” - car. ii., 3.  YOUNG man, wha at the gates o’ life  Are bauldly pushing forward,  Forgetna in the fash o’ strife  That a’ your days are order’d.  There’s mony a quest’on greatly vext,  An’ mony a truth disputit,  But that we a’ maun dee ‘s a text  … Continue reading Hughie Upon Human Conduct, pp.81-82.

Hughie’s Belief in Present Duty, p.80.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Vina liques, et spatio brevi  Spen longam reseces.” - CAR. I., II.  IT wasna meant that mortal men  Should read the deevil’s books to ken  (What they can never comprehen’)  The secret o’ their hinner en’.  -  The nobler gate o’t were to spen’  The scriptural threescore years an’ ten,  Or … Continue reading Hughie’s Belief in Present Duty, p.80.

Hughie Remonstrates with Davie – A dour Critic, pp.76-79.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Si me lyricis vatibus inseres!" - CAR. I., I.  MAN, Davie, had I but the ert  To pierce that stane ye ca’ your hert  Wi’ the clear dart o’ poesie,  A prooder man there wadna be.  For weel it’s kent thro’ a’ the toun  That nane can rise that ye ca’ … Continue reading Hughie Remonstrates with Davie – A dour Critic, pp.76-79.

Hughie Offers his Consolation to his Sister Meenie, Wha’s Heart is wi’ Donal’ in Lochiel, pp.74-75.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Miserarum est neque amori ludum neque dilci  Mala vino lavere, ant exanimari metuentes  Patruæ verbera linguæ.” - CAR. III., 12.  ‘OD, Meenie, but I’m vext for ye!  A lad could better thole, ye see,  The pangs o’ love unspoken,  For he could speak, an’ he could pree  A gless hooe’er hert … Continue reading Hughie Offers his Consolation to his Sister Meenie, Wha’s Heart is wi’ Donal’ in Lochiel, pp.74-75.

Hughie’s Flight as an Eagle, pp.71-73.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Jam jam residunt cruribus aspera.” - CAR. II., 20.  THE bards are birds an’ born to flee!  If I were ane, an’ choice were free,  I’d be an Eagle! wha but he  To rule the air!  The very sun wi’ open ee  He can ootstare!  -  His flicht is owre the … Continue reading Hughie’s Flight as an Eagle, pp.71-73.

Hughie’s Advice to Tammie to Live Less for the Future and more for the Present, pp.69-70.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Carpe diem!" - CAR. I., II.  Gie owre thae wild uncanny looks,  That trokin’ wi’ the deevil’s books,  That doctorin’ o’ yoursel’ wi’ simples  (It only fills your face wi’ pimples!)  An’ learn to live like ither folk  Whas’ trust is in their aitmeal poke!  -  Ye winna grow ae bit … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to Tammie to Live Less for the Future and more for the Present, pp.69-70.

Hughie’s Spring Sunshine Dashed wi’ Shadow, pp.67-68.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Solvitur acris hiems gratâ vice veris et Favoni.” - CAR. I., 4.  THE winter ice is breakin’ up,  The wast wind whistlin’ cracks his whup,  An’ noo ye hear their Hi! woa! h’up!  (Pleasant the hearin’!)  As plooman-lads wi’ steady grup  Draw oot their feerin’.  -  An’ now ere lang we’ll … Continue reading Hughie’s Spring Sunshine Dashed wi’ Shadow, pp.67-68.

Hughie’s Views on Soldiering, pp.65-66.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Nos prælia virginum  Sectis in juvenes unguibus acrium  Cantamus.” - CAR. I., 6.  WAR’S broken oot, an’ the toon’s wives are skirlin’,  An’ Jock maun awa’ to the muster at Stirlin’.  -  A douce lad, Jock, when he lived wi’ ‘s here,  Stappin’ aboot in his plooman’s gear,  An’ whustlin’ blithe … Continue reading Hughie’s Views on Soldiering, pp.65-66.

Hughie Driven in by a Tempest: He Defies the Elements from Behind a Jorum, pp.63-64.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Rapiamus, amici,  Occasionem de die, dumque virent genua.” - CAR. V., 13.  AN angry tempest, roarin’ lood,  Is broken lowse an’ ragin’ free;  The knock-wud groans wi’ anguish boo’d,  An’ rocks an’ writhes the moanin’ sea.  See whaur in whirlin’ shooers they flee,  The sprays o’ ocean, owre the main!  See … Continue reading Hughie Driven in by a Tempest: He Defies the Elements from Behind a Jorum, pp.63-64.

Hughie in Murnins: He Laments the Loss o’ his Frien’ Andro, pp.61-62.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Ergo Quinctilium perpetuus sopor  Urget!" - CAR. I. 24.  WHAT man or minister ‘ill dare  Haud oot his haund, an’ cry Forbear!  This wild, this waefu’ sorrow spare;  It’s Nature’s debt?  But I will baund an’ weepers wear  For Andro yet!  -  O for the wail o’ Autumn wun’s,  An’ trees, … Continue reading Hughie in Murnins: He Laments the Loss o’ his Frien’ Andro, pp.61-62.

Hughie’s Winter Excuse for a Dram, pp.58-60.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Vides ut alta stet nive candidum  Soracte.” - CAR. I., 9.  FRA whaur ye hing, my cauldrife frien’,  Your blue neb owre the lowe,  A snawy nightcap may be seen  Upon Benarty’s pow;  An’ snaw upon the auld gean stump,  Whas’ frostit branches hang  Oot-owre the dyke abune the pump  That’s … Continue reading Hughie’s Winter Excuse for a Dram, pp.58-60.

Hughie Flatters Saunders with an Ironical Description of Himself, pp.55-57.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Nec si quid olim lusit Anacreon,  Delevit ætas.” - CAR. IV. 9.  I TUNE my pipe to Doric strains  Wi’ great gude will, an’ meikle pains,  Altho’ my skill be like my gains -  Baith unco sma’;  An’ yet a something tae remains  Aboon the blaw.  -  It’s no’ for a’ … Continue reading Hughie Flatters Saunders with an Ironical Description of Himself, pp.55-57.

Hughie Lectures a Vain Old Maid, pp.53-54.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Fis anus, et tamen  Vis formosa videri.” - CAR. IV. 13.  EH, Nance! this is a sair come-doun;  An’ ye were ance sae braw,  The pridefu’est lass in a’ the toon,  Coortit by ane an’ a!  Ay, wumman, at oor time o’ life  Thae youthfu’ memories are rife -  Surely ye … Continue reading Hughie Lectures a Vain Old Maid, pp.53-54.

Hughie Thinks Himself now too Old for Love, pp.51-52.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Nocturnis ego somniis,  Fam captan teneom jam volucrem sequor.” - CAR. IV. I.  O HAUD awa’ thae lowin’ een!  I canna bide their licht,  I’m no’ sae young as I hae been,  Nor near sae strong o’ sicht.  I’m wearin’ near twa score an’ ten -  It’s mair becomin’ me  To … Continue reading Hughie Thinks Himself now too Old for Love, pp.51-52.

Hughie’s Happiness Based on Contentment, pp.49-50.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Scandit aratas vitiosa naves  Cura." - CAR. II. 16.  WHAT think ye’s the end that puir mortals should seek  In this weary warstle fra week on to week?  The young folk think pleasure, nae doot, wad be best,  But we, wha are aulder, are lookin’ for rest.  -  Owre sune like … Continue reading Hughie’s Happiness Based on Contentment, pp.49-50.

Hughie Fa’s in wi’ a Fairy, pp.47-48.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Vitas hinnuleo me similis, Chloë!" - CAR. I., 23.  WHA’S aucht this bonnie bashfu’ bairn  Cooerin’ her lane ahint the cairn?  Whas’ can the lassie be?  Or is’t a fairy fra the fern  Looks wonderin’ oot on me?  -  Tell me, thou timorous mountain fay,  If that thy name an’ lineage … Continue reading Hughie Fa’s in wi’ a Fairy, pp.47-48.

Hughie’s Monument, pp.44-46.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Non omnis moriar.” - CAR. III. 30.  IN vain the future snaps his fangs,  The tyke may rage - he canna wrangt’s,  I put my haund upon my sangs  Withoot a swither;  To me this monument belangs,  I need nae ither.  -  It’s no’ in granite to endoor,  Sandstane comes ripplin’ … Continue reading Hughie’s Monument, pp.44-46.

Hughie’s Waddin’ Gift to his Friend Jame, pp.41-43.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Ne quis modici transiliat munera Liberi.” - CAR. I., 18.  YE’RE leavin’ ‘s Jame! nae langer noo  To rank amon’ the wanters -  By way o’ waddin’ gift fra Hugh  Accepp thir twa decanters.  They’re fill’d wi’ Scotland’s noblest juice -  An’ whaur’s a nobler liquor?  They’ll aiblins help to heat … Continue reading Hughie’s Waddin’ Gift to his Friend Jame, pp.41-43.

Hughie Consoles and Counsels Young Nannie in the Absence of Davie, pp.39-40.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Prima nocte domum claude, neque in vias  Sub cantu querulæ despice tibiæ.” - CAR. III., 7.  O DRY that tear that trickles doun  For Davie owre the sea;  The fates 'ill keep him safe an soun’,  An’ that for sake o’ thee.  What pleasure wad it gie the fates  To vex … Continue reading Hughie Consoles and Counsels Young Nannie in the Absence of Davie, pp.39-40.

Hughie’s Testimony to the Worth o’ Auld Elspeth, pp.37-38.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Immunis aram si tetigit manus.” - CAR. III., 23.  MY gude auld Elspet, in your wee cot house,  Cheerfu’ i’ mornin’, an’ at e’enin’ douce  (For wark is cheery when a body’s fain;  But aye wi’ gloamin’ mem’ry comes again  To mend the broken circle roond the ingle,  Lang silent voices … Continue reading Hughie’s Testimony to the Worth o’ Auld Elspeth, pp.37-38.

Hughie at the Maiden’s Well, pp.34-36.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Fies nobilium tu quoque fontium.” - CAR. III., 13.  THOU bonnie modest mountain spring,  That tinkles oot aneth a stane  An’ seems to thy ainsel’ to sing -  For listener near is nane -  -  There’s neither birk nor rowan tree  Bends owre thy brink to shelter thee,  An’ but ae … Continue reading Hughie at the Maiden’s Well, pp.34-36.

Hughie’s Bachelor Party, pp.30-33.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Da lunæ propere novæ,  Da noctis mediæ.” - CAR. III., 19.  AY, here they come, thrang warstlin’ up the brae  Like sheep in single file,  No’ ane o’ them wi’ langidge left - they’re sae  Forfoughen wi’ their toil.  -  Tammy, ye’re first - but tailors for a broose!  Willie, my … Continue reading Hughie’s Bachelor Party, pp.30-33.

Hughie’s Invitation to a Friend in the City, pp.27-29.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Hic tibi copia  Manabit ad plenum benigno  Ruris honorum opulenta cornu.”  NOO Nature’s wauken’d fra her trance,  An’ sunbeams owre Lochleven glance,  An’ soothlan’ winds that blaw fra France  Bring soothlan’ weather,  An’ lambs like fairy pownies prance  Amang the heather.  -  Noo doun the rig the sawer swings,  An’ Jock … Continue reading Hughie’s Invitation to a Friend in the City, pp.27-29.

Hughie Takes his Ease in his Inn, pp.25-26.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Vates quid orat de patera novum  Fundens liquorem.” - CAR. I., 31.  NOO, by my croon, the sun sends doun  Uncommon drouthy weather,  But here’s an inn - if it were sin  We’ll spill a dram thegither!  An’ while we sit an’ rest oor fit,  Surveyin’ man’s dominion,  We’ll tak’ a … Continue reading Hughie Takes his Ease in his Inn, pp.25-26.

Hughie’s Anxiety for Davy on the Seas, pp.22-24.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Navis, quæ tibi creditum  Debes Virgilium.” CAR. I., 3.  NOO a’ ye winds, but ane that rair  An’ revel on the deep,  Respeck for ance a poet’s pray’r -  Swith to your caves, an’ sleep!  For Davy’s sake, wha taks the tide  This mornin’, be commaundit:  There’s fifty folk on Devonside  … Continue reading Hughie’s Anxiety for Davy on the Seas, pp.22-24.

Hughie’s Advice to Dauvit to Enjoy the Fine Weather, pp.19-21.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Gratia cum nymphis geminisque sororibus audet  Ducere nuda choros.” - CAR. IV., 7.  AN’ noo ance mair the Lomon’  Has donn’d his mantle green,  An’ we may gang a-roamin’  Thro’ the fields at e’en;  -  An’ listen to the rustlin’  O’ green leaves i’ the shaw,  An’ hear the blackbird whistlin’  … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to Dauvit to Enjoy the Fine Weather, pp.19-21.

Hughie in Love with a Shrew, pp.17-18.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Urit grata protervitas.” - CAR. I., 19.  I’VE nocht to wreak mysel’ upon,  An’ wark I dinna fancy,  Sae I’ll sit doun an’ hae a groan  Aboot my cruel Nancy.  She thraw’d her head when late yestreen  I telt her I was deein’ -  Either she disna care a preen,  Or … Continue reading Hughie in Love with a Shrew, pp.17-18.

Hughie Consoles Allan for the Loss of his Son, pp.15-16.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Non semper. . . foliis viduantur orni;  Tu semper urges flebilibus modis  Mysten ademptum." - CAR. II., 9.  IT’S winter wi’ us here amang the mountains,  Patient they stand wi’ leaden clouds opprest;  Silent are a’ the birds an’ singin’ fountains,  Weary they seem, an’ auld, an’ wantin’ rest.  The braes … Continue reading Hughie Consoles Allan for the Loss of his Son, pp.15-16.

Hughie Refuses to Emigrate, pp.12-14.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Ibi tu calentem  Debita sparges lacrima favillam  Vatis amici." - CAR. II., 6.  MATTHIE, nae mair! ye’se gang your lane!  Tak’ my best wishes wi’ ye,  An’ may guid fortun’ owre the main  An’ snugly settled see ye!  I wuss ye weel! the kintra’s lairge,  An ye’re but twa wi’ Mary;  … Continue reading Hughie Refuses to Emigrate, pp.12-14.

Hughie’s Anticipation of Hogmanay Night, pp.9-11.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Seu tu querlos sive geris jocos,  Seu rixom, et insanos amores,  Seu facilem, pia testa, somnum.” - CAR. III., 21.  HOO cam’ this bonnie greybeard here,  Sae trimly to the time o’ year,  When folk maun lay ‘t in, tho’ it’s dear?  But this, I’se wauger,  Cost but the buyin’ o’ … Continue reading Hughie’s Anticipation of Hogmanay Night, pp.9-11.

Hughie’s Indignation at the Conduct of the Absconding Elder, pp.6-8.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Mala soluta navis exit alite.” - CAR. V., 10.  HE’S aff the kintra at a spang!  He’s on the sea - they’ve tint him!  The warst o’ weather wi’ him gang!  Gude weather bide ahint him!  O for a rattlin’ bauld Scots blast  To follow an’ owretak’ him -  To screed … Continue reading Hughie’s Indignation at the Conduct of the Absconding Elder, pp.6-8.

Hughie’s Advice to Auld Tammy to tak’ the use o’ his Savings, pp.4-5.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Linquenda tellus et domus." - CAR. II., 14.  YE’RE agein’, Tammy, agein’ fast,  The season o’ your strength is past;  Ye’re white but whaur ye’re bauld;  The footmarks o’ the craw are seen  Aboot the corners o’ your een -  Ye’re auld, my frien’, ye’re auld!  There’s some that on life’s … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to Auld Tammy to tak’ the use o’ his Savings, pp.4-5.

Hughie’s Advice to his Brother John, pp.1-3.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Omnes eodem cogimur." - CAR. II., 3.  DEAR JOCK, ye’re higher up the brae  Than me, your aulder brither -  Keep mind the higher up ye gae  The mair ye’re in the weather.  I’m no’ misdootin’ that ye’re wice,  An’, for your ploo-share, speed it!  But I may better gi’e advice,  … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to his Brother John, pp.1-3.

Obittes this Zeire (1639), pp.369-371.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] Obitts this zeire, of eminent personages, wer, first, in the mounthe of Januarij, 1639, Robert Douglas, Wiscount Belheauen, sometyme Master of the Horses to Henrey, Prince of Walles, quho departed this lyffe at his duelling housse, neire Glasgow, the 5 day of this mounthe; to quhosse memorey his heires hes … Continue reading Obittes this Zeire (1639), pp.369-371.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1639-1640), pp.320-371.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As Regni Regis Carolj 15, et Sal: 1639. The castell of Edinbrughe wes takin by the Lordes couenanters, betuix foure and fyue a clocke in the eiuening of the 21 day of Marche, 1639; Mr Archbald Haddan, vnckell to the Laird of Gleneggies, being constable of the same, wnder the … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1639-1640), pp.320-371.

Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve)

[Celebratory Days Contents] A front page depiction of a Scottish tradition. This December 30, 1882, edition reads,“THE FIRST FOOT: A SCOTTISH CUSTOM ON NEW-YEAR’S EVE.”As you can see from the clock in the picture, however, it’s done after midnight into the early hours of New Year’s day, rather than on the eve of New Year. … Continue reading Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve)

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday July 18, 1840, pp.206-207.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS.  WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND.     THE mania respecting witchcraft - for such it might be called - which sprang up into vigour throughout southern Europe in consequence of the edicts of Innocent and Leo, spread in time to Scotland, and acquired strong possession of the public mind during the … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday July 18, 1840, pp.206-207.

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday March 7, 1840, pp.55-56.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS.  MODERN FICTIONS OF NORTHERN EUROPE.     THE introduction of Christianity among the Goths of northern Europe had naturally the same influence in abolishing the dark and gloomy fictions of their primitive mythology, as it has been shown to have exercised in the case of the Anglo-Saxons, an offshoot … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday March 7, 1840, pp.55-56.

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, February 15, 1840, pp.30-31.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS. THE DRUIDS.    INTERESTING as are the ancient superstitions and theological fables of Scandinavia, a notice of which formed the subject of the last paper in this series, British readers cannot but feel a still greater interest in the history of Druidism, the superstition which flourished peculiarly among … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, February 15, 1840, pp.30-31.

Day Fatality, June 25, 1836, pp.169-170.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] DAY FATALITY.     WE shall read history very imperfectly, if we be not aware of the numerous superstitions which, almost down to our own time, influenced the conduct of even the most enlightened nations. Accustomed as we are to ascertain every thing by experiment and fact, and to look to really … Continue reading Day Fatality, June 25, 1836, pp.169-170.

RSH Videos

Although, uncomfy with the idea of doing videos, it was something I was told was necessary to help highlight the site, as well as introduce folk to who was creating the content. I prefer to hide behind my old books, but here goes... - - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdrcj-6WPRE - - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VwfTuKkS6s - - https://youtu.be/aHbYwJX7IkY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rfndCDv0xM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3MY6c9IMn8 https://youtu.be/NYp95DF-ecgContinue reading RSH Videos

Giants, Dwarfs, and Pigmies, Saturday, June 8, 1833, pp.149-150.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] GIANTS, DWARFS, AND PIGMIES.    NOTWITHSTANDING the difference of opinion and controversy concerning giants and pigmies, it is sufficiently proved by travellers, whose veracity cannot be doubted, that there is not any country on the earth inhabited either by men who may strictly be called giants, or by pigmies. It is … Continue reading Giants, Dwarfs, and Pigmies, Saturday, June 8, 1833, pp.149-150.

No. V. (Cont.) – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st August, 1816, pp.577-583.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [“Seek out your ancient mother.”]    Respectfully inscribed to Gen. ALEXANDER DIROM, of Mount Annan.    SUCH were the outlines of this Cambrian kingdom, during the period of its recent existence: but these boundaries were shortly after contracted by the irruption of the eastern Angles, who, after a series … Continue reading No. V. (Cont.) – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st August, 1816, pp.577-583.

Christmas Eve, Christmas & Boxing Day

[Celebratory Days Contents] CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS AND OBSERVANCES IN SCOTLAND.  “Nor failed old Scotland to produce,  At such high tide, her savoury goose.”     OLD Father Christmas, with his jolly face, his rubicund form, his frosty hair, his presents for the children, his cheer and good news for young and old, rich and poor, is once … Continue reading Christmas Eve, Christmas & Boxing Day

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday , December 25, 1841, pp.387-388.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITION.  OCCULT SCIENCE OF THE ANCIENTS.     THE present article, we conceive, may fitly be introduced towards the close of the lengthened series of papers which have now been given up on the subject of Superstitions. Its purpose is to review a number of the most remarkable phenomena recorded … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday , December 25, 1841, pp.387-388.

Art. I. – WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND., Volume 18, Oct., 1891, pp.257-288.

[Scottish Review Contents] IT is with no feeling of pleasure that a writer of the present day can enter upon the task of sketching the sad history of Scottish witchcraft. Horrible as are the events attending the development of the witch mania on the Continent, an enquiry into them yet brings us into the presence … Continue reading Art. I. – WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND., Volume 18, Oct., 1891, pp.257-288.

No. V – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st July, 1816, pp.519-522.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."]    Respectfully inscribed to Gen. ALEXANDER DIROM, of Mount Annan.     BY the concurring testimony of ancient writers, it is quite apparent that the Mæatæ, or Midland Britons, possessed for ages a principality, or kingdom of their own, called Regnum Cambrense, or the kingdom … Continue reading No. V – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st July, 1816, pp.519-522.

No. IV. – On the Antiquity of Sepulchral Monuments and Inscriptions, 1st June, 1816, pp.436-443.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."] (From the Introduction to the "SEPULCHRALIA SCOTIÆ.”)    Respectfully inscribed to the Noblemen and Gentlemen constituting the Royal Society of Scottish Antiquaries.  INTRODUCTION.    AT a period when almost every species of literature is so assiduously cultivated and appreciated - when the diversified and … Continue reading No. IV. – On the Antiquity of Sepulchral Monuments and Inscriptions, 1st June, 1816, pp.436-443.

No. III. – On the Popular Superstitions of Ghosts and Witches, incident to the Border, 1st May, 1816, pp.344-352.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [“Seek out your ancient mother.”]    Respectfully inscribed to Sir G. McKENZIE, President of the Royal Society of Scottish Antiquities.     THE belief in ghosts, boagles, brownies, witches, fairies, &c., formed the more prominent features of the superstitious creeds of our feudal forefathers: not an old ruin upon the … Continue reading No. III. – On the Popular Superstitions of Ghosts and Witches, incident to the Border, 1st May, 1816, pp.344-352.

No. II. – On the Fairy Superstitions of the West of Scotland, 1st April, 1816, p.265-271.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [Seek out your ancient mother.]    To the Right Hon. the Earl of BUCHAN, the illustrious founder of our National Societies.     MY LORD,     THE study of popular superstitions, though intimately connected with the history of the human mind, has in a great measure been neglected in this, … Continue reading No. II. – On the Fairy Superstitions of the West of Scotland, 1st April, 1816, p.265-271.

No. I. – On the Sepulchral Monuments, CELTIC, DRUIDIC, ROMISH and SCANDIAC, connected with this Country, 1st March, 1816, pp.194-198.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents]    Respectfully inscribed to the venerable and illustrative founder of our National Society, The Right Honourable the Earl of BUCHAN.  “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."]    THERE is (says one of the greatest moralists of ancient times) a sort of melancholy pleasure in retracing the situation of cities once … Continue reading No. I. – On the Sepulchral Monuments, CELTIC, DRUIDIC, ROMISH and SCANDIAC, connected with this Country, 1st March, 1816, pp.194-198.

Part III. – Wraiths, 1st December, 1818, pp.13-17.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    NO part of our national mythology appears to have made so indelible an impression on the minds of the peasantry of Clydesdale, as that which relates to Wraiths, or spectral appearances of persons yet alive. It has neither been effaced by the extending prevalence of education. or by the … Continue reading Part III. – Wraiths, 1st December, 1818, pp.13-17.

Part II. – Fairies, 1st October, 1818, pp.30-35.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    MR EDITOR,     THE following fragment was written down, within these three weeks, from the recitation of a very worthy man, with whom it had been a great favourite in his youth. It certainly possesses little pretension to poetical merit; yet it details some particulars, peculiar itself, concerning the … Continue reading Part II. – Fairies, 1st October, 1818, pp.30-35.

Introduction and Part I. – Fairies, 1st August, 1818, pp.49-54.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    [The following communication, which is from the pen of a very respectable and worthy correspondent, will, we apprehend, be interesting to such of our readers as are gratified by the preservation of the fast-fading remains of the popular superstitions and peculiar dialect of our old Scottish peasantry. The author … Continue reading Introduction and Part I. – Fairies, 1st August, 1818, pp.49-54.

Obittes this Zeire (1638), pp.319-320.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In the mounthe of Marche this zeire, 1638, deyed William, Lord Alexander, eldest sone to William, first Earle of Streuelinge, Principall Secretarey of Scotland, at London. His corpes being enbalmed, wer brought home, and priually, in the night, enterred in Boweis Ile, in Streueling churche. He maried Ladey --- Douglas, … Continue reading Obittes this Zeire (1638), pp.319-320.

Nationall Assembley and Synod of Glasgow, pp.300-316.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In respecte the tyme of this nationall assembley and synod of Glasgow, wich sate from the 21 of Nouember, wntill the 21 of December this zeire, 1638, so maney bussines wer handled of heighe concernment, I will heir, for the readers memorey, onlie sett doune a diarey of the most … Continue reading Nationall Assembley and Synod of Glasgow, pp.300-316.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1638-1639), pp.249-320.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As Regni Regis Carolj 14, et Salutis 1638. About the 27 of Marche, this zeire, Traquaire makes for courte, hauing wndertakin to negotiate effectually for the peace of the countrey, and with 8 demandes from thesse that had subscriued and adhered to the couenant, wich he was to deall for … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1638-1639), pp.249-320.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1637-1638), pp.226-249.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As 13, Regni Regis Carolj, et Sal: 1637. The 13 of Julij, this zeire, 1637, the Lordes of his Maiesties priuey counsaile, by ther acte directed letters of horninge aganist the ministers, for baying and prowiding for eache paroche tuo bookes of comon prayer, with 15 dayes after they be … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1637-1638), pp.226-249.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, March 13, 1841, pp.63-64.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS. POPULAR FANCIES OF THE IRISH. - FIRST ARTICLE.    IRELAND has long teemed with superstitions of the wildest and most imaginative cast. Indeed, up to the present day, civilisation has been more ineffective in rooting them out from that country than from any other that can pretend to … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, March 13, 1841, pp.63-64.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1634-1637), pp.216-226.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As 10 Regni Regis Carolj, et Sal: 1634. In the mounth of Junij, 1634, Johne Elphinstone, Lord Balmerinoche, then a prissoner in Edinbrughe castle, quher he had beine imprissoned by his Maiesties command, (by the ouer-reuling pouer of the bischopes, and ther wicked and corrupte courte adherents) indicted befor the … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1634-1637), pp.216-226.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Extraordinary History of Mr Thomas Jenkins, Saturday, December 15, 1832, pp.361-362.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] EXTRAORDINARY HISTORY OF MR THOMAS JENKINS.    THE facts we are about to relate respecting this person are of so extraordinary a nature, that, if they had happened at a place distant from our scene of publication, or at a time remote from the present, we would have despaired of procuring … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Extraordinary History of Mr Thomas Jenkins, Saturday, December 15, 1832, pp.361-362.

The Order of K. Charles the I. Triumphall Entrey into the Citey of Edinbrughe.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] Entring at Castle Porte, and marching throughe the  Citey to his Palace of Holyrudhousse.  For maney ages this kingdome had not seine a more glorious and staitly entrey, the streetts being all railled and sanded; the cheiffe places quher he passed wer sett outt with staitly triumphall arches, obeliskes, pictures, … Continue reading The Order of K. Charles the I. Triumphall Entrey into the Citey of Edinbrughe.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1631-1634), pp.189-216.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1631. Vpone the first of Januarij, 1631, ther was a mightie feast made to the ambassador in the Kinges palace, at wiche ther wer non bot grandees and men of the golden key, quho are gentlemen of the Kings bed chamber. The ambassador sate at the tabells end, and all … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1631-1634), pp.189-216.

The Hermit of Manor, Saturday, April 27, 1833, pp.99-100.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] THE HERMIT OF MANOR. SO lately as December 1811, there died, in the vale of Manor, in Peebleshire, an aged individual, who had exhibited, during his life, nearly all the features and habits of the extinct species called a hermit. The name of this person was David Ritchie. He was deformed, … Continue reading The Hermit of Manor, Saturday, April 27, 1833, pp.99-100.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1630-1631), pp.177-189.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1630. Vpone new zeires day, 1630 arriued at London, Don Carolo de Coloma, ambassador from Spaine, to conclude the trettey, and had audience vpone Vedinsday the 12 of Januarij.  Aboute the end of Februarij, this zeire, a fleett of 14 saile, furnished with men, women and children, and all necessarieyes, … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1630-1631), pp.177-189.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1627-1630), pp.153-177.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1627. The 12 of Januarij this zeire, 1627, Alexander, Earle of Linlithgow, during the minority and lesse age of James, Duck of Lennox, is commissionat to be Admirall of Scotland. This commissione wes accompanied with a letter from his Maiesty, of the 15 of this same mounthe, to his priuey … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1627-1630), pp.153-177.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Epitaphs, Saturday, September 17, 1836, pp.266-267.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] EPITAPHS. To distinguish the last resting-place of a great man, or of a friend, by a monument and an epitaph, is the result of a natural, and, upon the whole, amiable disposition in man. It is a practice of great antiquity in almost all nations, and one which may be expected … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Epitaphs, Saturday, September 17, 1836, pp.266-267.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1626-1627), pp.134-153.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In Appryle this zeire, 1626, the parliament presents the King with a remonstrance aganist the Duck of Buckinghame, and charges him in the housse of peeirs one, 13 artickells.  First quberof was tuochning his plurality of offices wich he had inhansed, to the dishonor of the King and detriment of … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1626-1627), pp.134-153.

The Order of the Royall Feaste, pp.124-126.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] The supper was keipt in the archbishopes grate; hall and the table rached from the one end therof to the other.  The King sate in the midest of the table, serued by my Lord the Grate Prior, quho represented the grate masters persone; befor him ther marched a number of … Continue reading The Order of the Royall Feaste, pp.124-126.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1625-1626), pp.115-134.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 27 Marche, As 1 Caroli, et Sal: 1625.  KING Charles begane his rainge one Sonday the 27 of Marche, 1625, with the comon applausse and hartie love of all his subjectes; and one the last of Marche, being Thursday, at 2 a clocke in the afternoone, was solemly proclamied King, … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1625-1626), pp.115-134.

September 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] SAD RAILWAY ACCIDENT.  —————  WISHAW MAN FATALLY INJURED.  —————     Yesterday morning, William McCarridale, about 60 years of age, a hutch repairer, who resided in Caledonian Road, was fatally injured on the main line of the Caledonian Railway. He was proceeding to his work at Shields Colliery shortly before six … Continue reading September 1905

James the Sixth, his Character, pp.108-115.

[Historical Works Contents – Companion] THIS King’s character is much easier to take than his picture, for he could ever be hardly made to sit for the taking of that, which is the reason of so few good pieces of him; but his character was obvious to every eye.  He was of a middle stature, … Continue reading James the Sixth, his Character, pp.108-115.

K. Ja: the Sixth, his Charecter, pp.108-115.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] THIS Kinges charecter is much easier to take then his picture, for he could euer be hardlie made to sitt for the taking of that, wich is the reasone of so few good peeces of him; bot his charecter was obvious to eurey eye.  He was of a midle stature, … Continue reading K. Ja: the Sixth, his Charecter, pp.108-115.

King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625) – Updated, pp.1-107.

[Historical Works Contents - Companion] 1604.  THE parliament that was indicted on the 23rd of January, this year, to begin [on] the 10th of April thereafter, in the year 1604, was prorogued until the 24th day of the same month first, and the until the 18th of June; and at last ordained, by proclamation, to … Continue reading King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625) – Updated, pp.1-107.

King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625), pp.1-107.

[Historical Works Contents - Original] 1604.  THE parliament that wer indicted one the 23 of Januarij, this zeire, to begin the 10 of Appryle therafter, in Ao 1604, was prorougeud till the 24 day of the said monuthe first, and then wntill the 18 of Junij; and at last ordanid, by proclamatione, to be holdin … Continue reading King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625), pp.1-107.

August 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] ENGINE DASHES INTO CART.  —————  ALARMING AFFAIR AT CARNOUSTIE.  —————  MARVELLOUS ESCAPE AT LEVEL CROSSING.  —————     An accident of an alarming nature occurred at the level crossing at the foot of Golf Street, Carnoustie, yesterday afternoon.     It appears that Robert Fyffe, a carter in the employment of James … Continue reading August 1905

Scottish Wedding Customs

[Celebratory Days Contents] FROM THE SCOTTISH PRESS.  - MATRIMONIAL CASES.     OUR Scottish jurisprudence, from its simplicity, comprehension, and efficiency in regulating the rights between man and man, has often induced reform in the law of England. English lawyers may not be ready to acknowledge the obligation; but it is not the less true that … Continue reading Scottish Wedding Customs

Chapter XIX, pp.421-447.

[History of the Highlands Contents] MONTROSE appeared among his Athole friends at a time the most unfavourable for obtaining their aid. Many of them were engaged in the occupation of the harvest, securing, for the support of themselves and their families, the scanty and precarious crops which were then upon the ground, and which, if … Continue reading Chapter XIX, pp.421-447.

July 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF CARRIAGE DOORS.     Mr Alexander Hildersley, sanitary engineer, Belfast, has patented a contrivance by which the driver of a locomotive controls the opening of the carriage doors. The inventor claims that if the train is at a standstill in the station, with any or all doors closed, … Continue reading July 1905

Chapter XVIII, pp.394-420.

[History of the Highlands Contents] The successive victories of Montrose, in Scotland, were more than counterbalanced by those of the parliamentary forces in England. Under different circumstances, the success at Alford might have been attended with consequences the most important to the royal cause; but the defeat of the king, on the fourteenth of June, … Continue reading Chapter XVIII, pp.394-420.

June 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] FATALITY ON THE HIGHLAND RAILWAY.     Early yesterday morning the body of a man was found on the Highland Railway at Balavil, about three miles north of Kingussie. Information was at once conveyed to the police authorities at Kingussie, and Sergeant Fraser, in the forenoon, had the remains conveyed to … Continue reading June 1905

Chapter XVII., pp.365-393.

[History of the Highlands Contents] When the disastrous news of the battle of Inverlochy reached Edinburgh, the estates were thrown into a state of great alarm. They had, no doubt, begun to fear, before that event, and, of course, to respect the prowess of Montrose, but they never could have been made to believe that, … Continue reading Chapter XVII., pp.365-393.

May 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR ANNAN. - Last night the passenger train due at Annan at 4.30 P.M. from Kirtlebridge, on the Caledonian Railway, ran off the metals at the points at Corsehill, two miles from Annan. The engine and the whole of the carriages left the rails. Fortunately the train … Continue reading May 1905

Chapter XVI., pp.342-364.

[History of the Highlands Contents] MONTROSE now entertained confident expectations that many of the Royalists of the surrounding country, who had hitherto kept aloof, would join him; but after remaining three days at Perth, to give them an opportunity of rallying about his standard, he had the mortification to find, that, with the exception of … Continue reading Chapter XVI., pp.342-364.

April 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    ACCIDENT AT RAILWAY STATION. - On Saturday night James Macdonald, stonebreaker, Muir of Ord, on attempting to board the 7.25 north-going train while in motion, missed his footing and fell between the platform and the train, receiving an injury to his left leg. He was conveyed to the Northern … Continue reading April 1905

Chapter XV., pp.314-341.

[History of the Highlands Contents] HITHERTO the history of the Highlands has been confined chiefly to the feuds and conflicts of the clans, the details of which, though interesting to their descendants, cannot be supposed to afford the same gratification to readers at large, who require more inciting events to engage their attention than the … Continue reading Chapter XV., pp.314-341.

March 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    Mr Robert Sinclair Scott, of Greenock and Largs, a member of the shipbuilding firm of Scott & Co., Greenock, fell dead last evening in Glasgow Central Station.     He was crossing from the Station Hotel to board a train for London when he swooned and expired on the platform.  … Continue reading March 1905

Chapter XIV., pp.287-313.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE troubles in Sutherland and Caithness had been scarcely allayed, when a formidable insurrection broke out on the part of the Clan-Chattan against the earl of Moray, which occasioned considerable uproar and confusion in the Highlands. The Clan-Chattan had for a very long period been the faithful friends and followers … Continue reading Chapter XIV., pp.287-313.