Chap. XIII. – Made Dishes, pp.360-372.

[Made Dishes Contents] Beef à-la-Mode, Is made of a buttock of beef of any size; prepare a rich force meat thus: Pick the flesh from a fowl and the same quantity of nice bacon, with mixed spices and the yolks of eggs, wine and bread crumbs; take out the bone of the meat, and pierce … Continue reading Chap. XIII. – Made Dishes, pp.360-372.

Chap. XII. – Fricasseeing and Ragooing, pp.357-360.

[Fricasseeing & Ragooing Contents] White Fricassee of Chickens or Rabbits.    AFTER blanching well in water cut in quarters or joints and parboil them; then make a sauce with part of their liquor, thus: Take a bit of veal, cut it small, an onion stuffed with white pepper, a little mace, a few button mushrooms, … Continue reading Chap. XII. – Fricasseeing and Ragooing, pp.357-360.

Chap. XI. – Stewing, pp.350-357.

[Stewing Contents] Rump of Beef.    This is a very strong dish, and should be dressed as simply as fashion will at all admit of. Roast it till nearly half done, then put it into a very deep stewpan with three quarts (choppins) water, some spiceries, vegetables, sweet herbs, and a few onions; cover very … Continue reading Chap. XI. – Stewing, pp.350-357.

Chap. IX. – Broiling, pp.338-344.

[Broiling Contents] General Rules.    STUDY to have a strong clear fire, the tongs and gridiron perfectly clean; after the gridiron is hot, rub it over with suet. In dressing steaks turn them very often and quick, to preserve the juice; the dishes should be kept warm, as every thing broiled, if not served quite … Continue reading Chap. IX. – Broiling, pp.338-344.

Chap. VIII. – Baking, pp.335-337.

[Baking Contents]    THE only necessary observation here is, that whatever vessel or pan meat is baked in ought to be kept sweet and clean. Most of the articles in the former chapter may be done in the oven, observing to pour in at least a pint (mutchkin) of water with a piece of butter.  … Continue reading Chap. VIII. – Baking, pp.335-337.

Chap. VI. – Boiling Meats, pp.316-324.

[Boiling Meats Contents] General Rules.    All kinds of meat should be well washed and boiled very slow in plenty of water, which makes it swell and look plump; keep it clear from scum, and the pot close covered. If it boils too hasty the outside will be hardened before the inside is warmed, and … Continue reading Chap. VI. – Boiling Meats, pp.316-324.

Chap. V. – Gravies and Sauces, pp.305-316.

[Gravies & Sauces Contents] Browning for all Kinds of Sauces and Gravies.    POUND four ounces refined sugar, which put into a frying pan with one ounce butter; when it begins to get frothy and the sugar melted hold it higher above the fire; when it is of a deep brown, pour in by degrees … Continue reading Chap. V. – Gravies and Sauces, pp.305-316.

Chap. IV. – Soups and Broths, pp.288-305.

[Soups & Broths Contents] Rules to be attended to in the management of Soups, Gravies, and Broths.    NEVER let them remain in the vessel in which they are cooked; as it is not only pernicious to the health, but the vessels impart a bad taste to whatever is kept a night in them.     … Continue reading Chap. IV. – Soups and Broths, pp.288-305.

Chap. III. – Carving, pp.266-287.

[Carving Contents] General Observations.    THE seat for the carver, whether lady or gentleman, should be sufficiently high, to prevent the necessity of rising, and to command a proper view of the table. The carving knife should not be too large, and of a fine edge; a steel should be placed beside the carver. Strength … Continue reading Chap. III. – Carving, pp.266-287.

Chap. II. – Trussing of Poultry, &c., pp.260-266.

[Trussing Contents] General Rules.    All the stubs should be carefully taken out, and when drawing poultry be careful of the gall, for should that break the bitterness would totally destroy whatever part it touches; neither can any means be used to remove it. Be careful also of the gut joining the gizzard, for should … Continue reading Chap. II. – Trussing of Poultry, &c., pp.260-266.

Chap. I. – Directions for Marketing, pp.245-260.

[Marketing Contents] To Chuse Meats. Beef.    Young Ox Beef, is of a red carnation colour, the grain smooth and open, the fat white, with a yellow and pink shade, and of a crumbling, oily softness. The meat of yellow fat is seldom good.     Cow Beef has a closer grain, the colour less bright, … Continue reading Chap. I. – Directions for Marketing, pp.245-260.

Introductory Observations, pp.243-245.

[Old Scottish Recipes Contents]    THE number of pans and other utensils used in cooking, and the bad consequences resulting from the want of attention to cleanliness in this department, must be the only apology for again insisting upon a strict attention and care in keeping every utensil bright and clean. The tables, dressers, and … Continue reading Introductory Observations, pp.243-245.

Chap. VIII. – Pickling, pp.224-242.

[Pickling Contents]    PREPARING pickles is now practised in almost every family, and those who make their own pickles have the satisfaction of eating them without the fear of their being hurtful, as must be the case where cleanliness is wanting, or where brass pans are made use of for the purpose of rendering them … Continue reading Chap. VIII. – Pickling, pp.224-242.

Chap. VII. – Vinegars, Sauces, &c., pp.216-224.

[Vinegars, Sauces, &c., Contents]    UNDER this head, it will be necessary to point out the method of making vinegar, also the different kinds of vinegar used in sauces. Vinegar, by being exposed to the air in a flat vessel, in time of frost, is rendered much stronger, in proportion to the degree of freezing, … Continue reading Chap. VII. – Vinegars, Sauces, &c., pp.216-224.

Chap. VI. – Fruit Pies, pp.212-216.

[Fruit Pies Contents]    Observations. - Pies of every kind require particular care that the heat of the oven be proportioned to the articles baked, both as to size and quality. A light, or puff paste, requires a moderate heat. Pies, when large, must have time to soak thoroughly; they should be well covered with … Continue reading Chap. VI. – Fruit Pies, pp.212-216.

Chap. V. – Baking Bread, &c., pp.201-212.

[Baking Bread, &c., Contents]    THE expence of private brewing, from the necessity and pressure of the times, has obliged most families to relinquish the making of ales, and it is now chiefly confined to large breweries, whereby much inconvenience has been felt by bakers, &c. from want of proper yeast. This inconvenience has been … Continue reading Chap. V. – Baking Bread, &c., pp.201-212.

Chap. IV. – Custards, pp.197-200.

[Custards Contents]    Observation. - Custards should be made in a pan that is well tinned and rinsed, with a spoonful of water, to prevent the ingredients sticking to the bottom. Two or three marbles, by rolling about, may have the same effect. Custards should not boil, but ought to be taken off the fire … Continue reading Chap. IV. – Custards, pp.197-200.

Chap. III. – Cheesecakes, pp.194-197.

[Cheesecakes Contents]    Observation. - Cheesecakes should be quickly put through hand, especially those composed of almonds, which are apt to oil and have a bad taste, which spoils their lightness. The oven should be moderate, not to scorch them but to give time for rising.  Lemon Cheesecakes.    Take the peel of two lemons, … Continue reading Chap. III. – Cheesecakes, pp.194-197.

Witches in Scottish History

[IndyLive Research Contents] Scottish Review, Art. I. – Francis Legge’s WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND., Oct., 1891.  ... In the history of Scottish witchcraft there is nothing to excite the wonder which in some measure deadens the disgust with which we contemplate the deeds of a Philip the Fair or a Gilles de Retz. Here the victims … Continue reading Witches in Scottish History

Chap. II. – Tarts, pp.188-194.

[Tarts Contents] Apples and Pears.    Pare and core the apples, or pears, stew then with a little water till very tender, and like beaten marmalade; sweeten it to your taste, add for seasoning pounded cinnamon, orange or lemon peel, a little lemon juice, or grate. Line the tart-pans with puff paste, fill them with … Continue reading Chap. II. – Tarts, pp.188-194.

Chap. I. – Pastry, pp.176-188.

[Pastry Contents]    IN this branch much depends upon the proper degree of heat required to bake the various articles; and unless this is attended to it is vain to expect satisfaction from your work, however well made. Puff paste requires rather a brisk oven, but not to scorch the paste; if it is too … Continue reading Chap. I. – Pastry, pp.176-188.

Robert Archibald Smith’s Music

[Old Scottish Music Contents] Paul Burns has provided some music, as composed by Robert Archibald Smith, for us. - Firstly we have On wi' the Tartan, as composed by R. A. Smith, from 1843. Words as per Hugh Ainslie. Can ye lo'e, my dear lassie,⁠The hills wild and free,Whar the sang o' the shepherd⁠Gars a' ring … Continue reading Robert Archibald Smith’s Music

A List of Articles used in Confectionary, &c., pp.174-175.

[Old Scottish Recipes Contents] A confection pan. The hooks and eyes of the casting pan should be oiled from time to time, as it makes the motion easier. A stove, and a crane for it. An iron standard, which is placed before the stove to hold the sieves with the comfits to harden, while in the course of … Continue reading A List of Articles used in Confectionary, &c., pp.174-175.

Chap. XVI. – Deserts, pp.171-173.

[Deserts Contents]    THE laying out of deserts depending so much on taste and fancy, very little is necessary to be said. The plates subjoined will serve to show the manner they are placed on the table. In large deserts, it is necessary that the desert be laid down upon the floor of an adjoining … Continue reading Chap. XVI. – Deserts, pp.171-173.

Chap. XV. – Gingerbreads, &c., pp.167-170.

[Gingerbreads, &c. Contents] Fine Gingerbread.  lib. oz. Treacle 8 0 Flour 12 0 Orange Peel 2, 3, or 4 0 Fresh Butter 1 8 Ground Ginger 0 4 Ground Jamaica Pepper 0 5 Caraway Seeds 0 8 Pot, or Pearl Ashes 0 6 Alum 0 2     Rub the butter very fine into the flour and then mix in the fruits and spiceries, afterwards the treacle; wash out the dish with water, in which dissolve the ashes; then melt the alum in a … Continue reading Chap. XV. – Gingerbreads, &c., pp.167-170.

Chap. XIV. – Cakes and Biscuits, pp.129-167.

[Cakes and Biscuits Contents]    General Observations. - Before you begin making the cake study to have every thing you are to use in readiness; the sugar pounded and sifted, the fruits cleaned and weighed, the orange peel, &c. cut, the almonds blanched and cut longways, flour weighed and sifted, and if damp spread before … Continue reading Chap. XIV. – Cakes and Biscuits, pp.129-167.

Chap. XIII. – Lemonade, Orangeade, &c., pp.126-129.

[Lemonade, Orangeade, &c. Contents] Lemonade.    Take half a pint (mutchkin) spring water, half a pound loaf sugar, the peel of a lemon cut down in the water, half a pint (two gills) lemon juice, mix all together and run it through a flannel bag; if too sour add more water and sugar.     This … Continue reading Chap. XIII. – Lemonade, Orangeade, &c., pp.126-129.

Chap. XII. – Ice Creams, pp.119-126.

[Ice Creams Contents]    THE ice pot is made of pewter, with a close lid, somewhat in shape of a confectioner’s show glass for holding comfits; they may be had ready made at any pewterer’s, and of any size. The spoon is in shape of a small spade, made of copper, tinned, and a wooden … Continue reading Chap. XII. – Ice Creams, pp.119-126.

Chap. X. – Syllabubs, Flummeries, &c., pp.106-110.

[Syllabubs, Flummeries, &c. Contents] Common Syllabubs.    Take a pint of cyder and a bottle of strong beer, put them in a bason, with nutmeg grated, and sugar, to your taste, to which add a sufficient quantity of rich milk; the whole is then whisked up light and the glasses filled; or poured into a … Continue reading Chap. X. – Syllabubs, Flummeries, &c., pp.106-110.

Chap. I. – Comfits, pp.1-18.

[Old Scottish Recipes Contents] Comfits To Clarify Sugar Smooth Blown Feathered Crackled Carmil Decription of the Casting Pan The Stove Caraway Comfits Musk Balls, or Plumbs Corianders Description of the Dropper Cardamoms Cassia Buds Barberries Almonds Diavollini Steel and Tin Comfits Nonpareils Bandstrings Confected Peppermint Drops Dragee, Bergamot Shells, and Shapes Common Comfits

Chap. IX. – Ornamental Jellies, pp.95-105.

[Ornamental Jellies Contents] Fruits in Jelly.    JELLIES that are transparent may be made to have a beautiful appearance, by colouring them with various colours and laying the one above the other; observing that one kind is cold before the other, which ought to be only milk warm, is put over it, otherwise they would … Continue reading Chap. IX. – Ornamental Jellies, pp.95-105.

Chap. VIII. – Marmalades and Jellies, pp.84-95.

[Marmalades and Jellies Contents] Orange Marmalade Chipped.    Take ten dozen bitter oranges, pick them high coloured, clean skinned, and heavy; cut the skins in quarters from top to bottom and strip them off; put the skins into a pan, cover them close up with a cloth, put it on the fire, and fill it … Continue reading Chap. VIII. – Marmalades and Jellies, pp.84-95.

Chap. VII. – Candying and Drying, pp.79-84.

[Candying and Drying Contents] Orange and Lemon Peel.    The orange and lemon peel being properly prepared (vide page 48.) they are taken out of the casks; after being well drained from the syrup, washed in water, and placed with their mouths downwards into sieves; and after dripping for a day, set in a stove … Continue reading Chap. VII. – Candying and Drying, pp.79-84.

Chap. VI. – Pastes, Conserves, and Brandy Fruits, pp.75-79.

[Pastes, Conserves, and Brandy Fruits Contents] Red and White Currant Paste.    Pick the berries from the stalks, scald and rub them through a sieve, pass it through a jelly bag; for every pint (mutchkin) of juice, have ready twenty four ounces refined sugar, pounded and sifted; boil the juice about fifteen minutes, then stir … Continue reading Chap. VI. – Pastes, Conserves, and Brandy Fruits, pp.75-79.

Chap. V. – Preserving, pp.48-74.

[Preserving Contents] Orange Peel.    Take Seville oranges, cut the skin in quarters and strip it off; put them in a strong pickle of salt and water and let them remain ten days; or they may be kept in the pickle till you use them. Those who make large quantities procure the skins from the … Continue reading Chap. V. – Preserving, pp.48-74.

Chap. IV. – Lozenges and Syrups, pp.41-48.

[Lozenges and Syrups Contents] Lozenges, WHICH are now much used, are well calculated for keeping the throat moist, and are held in repute according to the ingredients with which they are composed. Peppermint is an herb of a most powerful nature, and used in all complaints of the stomach arising from wind or griping; it … Continue reading Chap. IV. – Lozenges and Syrups, pp.41-48.

Chap. III. – Ornamental Confectionary, pp.31-40.

[Ornamental Confectionary Contents] Sugar Loaves, or Clove Biscuits.    TAKE the whites of four eggs, which beat up with treble refined sugar, finely pounded, and put through a lawn sieve, in the same way as directed in making icing for cakes; when it is very white add some oil of cloves to flavour it, and … Continue reading Chap. III. – Ornamental Confectionary, pp.31-40.

Chap. II. – Tablets, Drops, Barley Sugars, &c., pp.18-31.

[Tablets, Drops, Barley Sugars, &c. Contents] TABLETS must be made of fine sugar. The best way, when they are to be made in quantities, is this; clarify the sugar and boil it till it blows strong, have ready a small brass pan, into which put the quantity you want. Begin with those kinds which are … Continue reading Chap. II. – Tablets, Drops, Barley Sugars, &c., pp.18-31.

Complete Confectioner and Family Cook (1809)

[Scanned Images Contents] This has come down from the bookshelf by request. Someone who I'm a dedicated follower of, political commentator Maximilien Robespierre, had asked if I had any old Scottish recipes from the 18th century. As this book was published in 1809, we can safely assume not much had changed with regards these recipes … Continue reading Complete Confectioner and Family Cook (1809)

Chap. I. – Comfits, pp.1-18.

[Comfits Contents]    CLEANLINESS in this department cannot be too strongly recommended, the pans being usually made of brass, or copper; and sugar, according to chemists, containing a very great portion of oxalic acid, it must extract, when allowed to remain any length of time in a pan, part of the poisonous quality of the … Continue reading Chap. I. – Comfits, pp.1-18.

Preface, pp.iii-vi.

[Old Scottish Recipes Contents]    SO many works having been recently laid before the public on the subjects of CONFECTIONARY and COOKERY, it may be necessary shortly to explain to the reader the reasons which have led to the publication of the following treatise.     THE author has long had it in contemplation to exhibit … Continue reading Preface, pp.iii-vi.

Chapter IX. – A.D. 1602-1613, pp.113-128.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] King of Scotland:- King of Great Britain:- James VI., 1567-1603. James I., 1603-1625.  Feud between the Colquhouns and Macgregors - Macgregors outlawed - Execution of their Chief - Quarrel between the clan Kenzie and Glengarry - Alister Mac-Uilleam-Mhoir beheaded - Lawless proceedings in Sutherland - Deadly quarrel in Dornoch - Meeting between … Continue reading Chapter IX. – A.D. 1602-1613, pp.113-128.

RSH Versions of IndyLive Offerings

[RSH Videos Contents] Random Scottish History provide hour-long offerings at random on the last Friday of every month. There can be longer versions that go out in advance to the RSH Patrons. For the IndyLive platform they can be no longer than an hour, but they can sometimes be longer than that, and those are … Continue reading RSH Versions of IndyLive Offerings

Chapter VIII. – A.D. 1588-1601, pp.102-113.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] King of Scotland:- King of Great Britain:- James VI., 1567-1603. James I., 1603-1625.  Feud between the Colquhouns and Macgregors - Macgregors outlawed - Execution of their Chief - Quarrel between the clan Kenzie and Glengarry - Alister Mac-Uilleam-Mhoir beheaded - Lawless proceedings in Sutherland - Deadly quarrel in Dornoch - Meeting between … Continue reading Chapter VIII. – A.D. 1588-1601, pp.102-113.

Kirkcudbrightshire (Miscellaneous)

[Extra Articles Contents] This information is specific to a number of queries I received from an interested party via the site's contact form. As usual, the information is solely from the Press. Should others have extra information they'd like to add, please feel free to do so in the comments. - 1. The clan that … Continue reading Kirkcudbrightshire (Miscellaneous)

Chapter VII. – A.D. 1516-1588, pp.80-102.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Kings of Scotland:-  James V., 1513-1542. James VI., 1567-1603. Mary, 1542-1567.   Doings in Sutherland - Battle of Torran-Dubh - Feud between the Keiths and the clan Gun - John Mackay and Murray of Aberscors - Alexander Sutherland, the bastard, claims the Earldom - Contests between John Mackay and the Master of … Continue reading Chapter VII. – A.D. 1516-1588, pp.80-102.

Chapter VI. – A.D 1424-1512, pp.71-80.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Kings of Scotland:-  James I., 1406-1436. James III., 1460-1488. James II., 1436-1460. James IV., 1488-1513.  James I. - State of Country - Policy of the King to the Highland Chiefs - Lord of the Isles - Disturbances in Sutherland - Barbarity of a Robber - James’s Highland Expedition - Disturbances in Caithness … Continue reading Chapter VI. – A.D 1424-1512, pp.71-80.

Chapter V. – A.D. 1107-1411, pp.59-71.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Kings of Scotland during the Period:- Alexander I., 1107-1124. John Baliol, 1292-1306. David I., 1124-1153. Robert Bruce, 1306-1329. Malcolm IV., 1153-1165. David II., 1329-1332. William the Lion, 1165-1214. Edward Baliol, 1332-1341. Alexander II., 1214-1249. David II., restored, 1341-1370. Alexander III., 1249-1285. Robert II. (Stewart), 1370-1390. Regency, 1286-1290. Robert III., 1390-1406. Interregnum, 1290-1292. James I., 1406-1436.  Alexander I. - David I. - Insurrections in Highlands … Continue reading Chapter V. – A.D. 1107-1411, pp.59-71.

Chapter IV. – A.D. 843-1107, pp.48-58.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] The Norse Invasions - Kenneth - Constantine - Aodh - Grig and Eocha - Donald IV. - Constantine III. - Danes - Battle of Brunanburg - Malcolm I. - Indulph - Duff - Culen - Kenneth Ill. - Battle of Luncarty - Malcolm II. - Danes - Duncan - … Continue reading Chapter IV. – A.D. 843-1107, pp.48-58.

Chapter III. – A.D. 446-843, pp.32-48.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Early History - Scottish Settlement - Origin of Scots - Dalriada - Conversion of Picts - Druidism - St. Columba - Iona - Spread of Christianity - Brude and his Successors - Dun-Nechtan - Pictish Wars - Ungus - Contests - Norsemen - Union of Picts and Scots - … Continue reading Chapter III. – A.D. 446-843, pp.32-48.

Chapter II., pp.16-32.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Early Inhabitants - Roman Writers - Aristotle - Tacitus - Dion Cassius - Caledonians and Mæatæ - Eumenius - Picts - Dicaledones and Vecturiones - Claudian - Inferences - Ecclesiastical Chroniclers - Their value - Gildas - Adamnan - Northern and Southern Picts - Columba’s “Interpreter” - Bede’s Account … Continue reading Chapter II., pp.16-32.

‘A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments’ (1875)

[Scanned Images Contents] A friend found two excellent old sets that I was happy to have him obtain for me. This is possibly my favourite of the two. It's so wonderfully illustrated throughout and the chapters aren't as extensive as they might seem from the size of the publications. The chapters are also laid out … Continue reading ‘A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments’ (1875)

Chapter I. – B.C. 55-A.D. 446, pp.1-16.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents] Highlands defined - Ancient Scotland - Roman transactions - Agricola - Caledonians - Contest at Loch Ore - Galgacus - Mons Grampius - Battle - Agricola superseded - Lollius Urbicus - Antonine’s Wall - Ulpius Marcellus - Severus - Constantius Chlorus - Picts - Scots - Attacots - Attack … Continue reading Chapter I. – B.C. 55-A.D. 446, pp.1-16.

Remarks on the Scenery of the Highlands, by Professor Wilson, pp.xiii-xxxvi.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents]    IN no other country does Nature exhibit herself in more various forms of beauty and sublimity than in the north of England and the Highlands of Scotland. This is acknowledged all who, having studied their character, and become familiar with the feelings it inspires, have compared the effects … Continue reading Remarks on the Scenery of the Highlands, by Professor Wilson, pp.xiii-xxxvi.

Preface, pp.vii-viii.

[History of the Scottish Highlands Contents]    NO apology is deemed necessary for bringing this History of the Scottish Highlands before the public. A work under a similar title was brought out by the present publishers upwards of thirty years ago, under the care of Dr James Browne, and met with a sale so extensive … Continue reading Preface, pp.vii-viii.

Proceedings Against the Episcopalians, pp.278-319.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    It will readily be inferred from the tone of the declarations and testimonies of the persecuted Presbyterians, that when they got the upper hand, Episcopacy would receive scant toleration from them. From the adoption of the Covenant down through the period of the civil wars, the great leaders abjured … Continue reading Proceedings Against the Episcopalians, pp.278-319.

Proceedings Against the Covenanters, pp.173-277.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    THE historian of “the sufferings of the Church of Scotland, from the Restoration to the Revolution,” filled two dense folio volumes with the materials which he had collected on the subject, and they overflowed into some ancillary works of biography and general gossip. There is no intention on the … Continue reading Proceedings Against the Covenanters, pp.173-277.

Gender-Fluidity in Scottish History

[IndyLive Research Contents] The history of those seeking to physically change their gender doesn’t extend further back than the 1930s really, when surgery became available, in a limited & pretty basic fashion, for that purpose. Prior to the 20th century the most that could be achieved was in how you dressed, styled, and carried yourself. … Continue reading Gender-Fluidity in Scottish History

Proceedings Against the Roman Catholics, pp.117-172.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    FOR reasons which it is unnecessary to examine on this occasion, the establishment of the Reformation in Scotland was an extremely rapid operation. On the morning of the 23rd of August, 1560, the Romish hierarchy was nominally in full existence; ere eve, it had become penal to perform its … Continue reading Proceedings Against the Roman Catholics, pp.117-172.

Spectral and Dream Testimony, pp.78-116.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    IT is often remarked how very rarely narratives of supernatural events find their way into the proceedings of courts of justice, when it is remembered how large an amount of belief they still receive even among the educated classes. There is something uncongenial with the supernatural in such an … Continue reading Spectral and Dream Testimony, pp.78-116.

Trials for Poisoning, pp.1-78.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    M. DUMAS makes his Count of Monte Christo comment sarcastically on the vulgar criminal poisoner, who, with the marks of excitement visible on his countenance, goes to the nearest chemist to buy arsenic for destroying imaginary rats, mixes in the victim’s food enough of the poison to slay a … Continue reading Trials for Poisoning, pp.1-78.

‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1904-1907,’ (2022)

[Available Books Contents] ‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1904-1907,‘ [Illustrated] (Aug., 2022) https://youtu.be/hJ131wwXj2U Hardback Paperback Kindle For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal & receive £5 discount - Paperbacks Click Here to Pay by Paypal & receive £5 discount - Hardbacks [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – Paypal will take a … Continue reading ‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1904-1907,’ (2022)

Trials for Witchcraft, pp.236-310.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    THE study of the witchcraft trials in Scotland leaves behind it a frightful intelligence of what human nature may become. The impression made by these tough and sometimes drearily formal records is more dark and dreadful than anything imparted by fictitious writing. The difference is as great as all … Continue reading Trials for Witchcraft, pp.236-310.

The Burning of Frendraught, pp.202-235.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    A LONG conflict between two great houses in the North reached its climax in a tragedy so strange and horrible, that it became marked and renowned among the thousands of feudal outrages which fill the history of the period. Though common fame stamped it as an act of feudal … Continue reading The Burning of Frendraught, pp.202-235.

The Darien Expedition, and the trial of Captain Green for Piracy and Murder, pp.101-201.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    ON the 11th of April, 1705, the commander of the English trading ship, the Worcester, with two of his crew, were hanged in chains on the sands of Leith, having been convicted by the Scottish Court of Admiralty of piracy and murder. It was a general impression at the … Continue reading The Darien Expedition, and the trial of Captain Green for Piracy and Murder, pp.101-201.

Trial of James Stewart for the Murder of Campbell of Glenure, pp.73-100.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    THE solitary crime of which we are now to give a brief account, forms no inapt supplement to the wild history of the Macgregors. It was the expiring flame of that clan animosity which had been fostered by the previous monarchs of Scotland, as the divide et impera by … Continue reading Trial of James Stewart for the Murder of Campbell of Glenure, pp.73-100.

Proceedings Against the Clan Gregor, pp.1-72.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    IF one were desired to point out upon the map, on no surer ground than the mere physical character of the country, that spot which must have been the main battle-field between the Celtic races living among the mountains, and the people of Saxon origin who tilled the plain, … Continue reading Proceedings Against the Clan Gregor, pp.1-72.

Introductory Notice, pp.iii-iv.

[Narratives from Criminal Trials Contents]    WHOEVER professes to disclose from criminal records anything that has both importance and novelty to recommend it, will generally need no further excuse for offering it to the public. There can be no source of information more fruitful in incidents which have the attraction of picturesqueness along with the … Continue reading Introductory Notice, pp.iii-iv.

‘Narratives from Criminal Trials in Scotland’ (1852)

[Scanned Images Contents] This wee set was obtained with the help of a super supportive patron of RSH. I felt they might be of use to glean wee stories from for folk that may be interested in readings of them. After flicking through them, I fell like the author may be one of the same … Continue reading ‘Narratives from Criminal Trials in Scotland’ (1852)

Chap. 6., pp.135-195.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] Consequences of the restoration of episcopacy - Ejection of nonconforming ministers.  - Battle of Pentland. - Highland host at Glasgow. - Battles of Drumclog, Glasgow, and Bothwelbridge. - Persecutions. - Death of Charles II. - State of affairs under James II.  - Revolution. - Re-establishment of presbytery.     WHEN the … Continue reading Chap. 6., pp.135-195.

Chap. 5., pp.100-134.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] The subject continued. - The commonwealth. - The restoration.  - Episcopacy re-established in 1660.     THE whole authority in Scotland, was at this period, in the hands of Argyle, and the covenanters, a party, which was most inimical to the interests of royalty. In their political conduct, however, they embraced … Continue reading Chap. 5., pp.100-134.

Chap. 3., pp.48-76.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] History of the Bishoprick continued - Presbytery abolished in 1610  - Re-established in 1638.     After closing the tragedy of the celebrated Mr. John Ogilvy, we return to the spiritual part of the history of the bishoprick, and find in the year 1610, our sagacious sovereign James VI. of Scotland … Continue reading Chap. 3., pp.48-76.

Chap. 1., pp.1-20.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] The history of the bishoprick from the earliest accounts to the Reformation.  IN the nether-ward of Clydesdale and shire of Lanark, on the banks of the Clyde, stands the city of Glasgow, situated in 55°. 51’. 32”. N. Latitude, and 4. 15’. Longitude W. of Greenwich. GLASGOW, we are told by … Continue reading Chap. 1., pp.1-20.

Sect. IV., pp.23-28.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] Of the Protestant Church.  THE gross corruption of doctrine, the extreme indolence, the dissolute manners, and the barbarous cruelty of the Romish clergy in this kingdom, concurred to bring about the reformation of religion, which was established by parliament, anno 1560. From that time, the Romish regular clergy were suppressed, … Continue reading Sect. IV., pp.23-28.

Sect. III., pp.14-23.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] Of the Romish church.  THE church of Rome introduced, by slow degrees, her innovations and corruptions into Scotland. A few of her superstitious customs were adopted in the eighth century.  It has been said, that, before the eleventh century, we had no diocesian bishops; and that, although we had one … Continue reading Sect. III., pp.14-23.

Sect. II., pp.13-14.

[History of Glasgow, &c. Contents] Of the Primitive Christian Church.  AT what particular time Christianity was first made known in Scotland, cannot be easily determined. It is not improbable, however, that it had sure footing in North Britain, in the third, and fourth centuries. But, as pagan druidism could not have been at once extirpated, … Continue reading Sect. II., pp.13-14.

Scotish Minstrel Miscellany

[Old Scottish Music Contents] The music here is from a series of books I lent Paul Burns out the RSH archive, 'Scotish Minstrel' (undated 19thC publications). He has very wonderfully provided these for us from them. - Jenny has kindly loaned to me some rare books in her ‘Scotish Minstrel’ collection of Vocal melodies. This tune … Continue reading Scotish Minstrel Miscellany

 🌈Pride in Scottish History 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

[IndyLive Research Contents] As it’s Pride season, with MardiGla just having taken place in Glasgow there, I thought we’d get into how those found to be attracted to the same sex have been treated throughout our history. I did turn up in my rainbow unicorn onesie to see off the rainbow clad marchers, though I … Continue reading  🌈Pride in Scottish History 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

Note E. – John Layng, Rector of Kilpatrick-Juxta and Parson of Luss, pp.93-99.

[Notes on the Black Book Contents]    Master John Layng, whose name is written on the Abridgment of the Black Book of Paisley, was rector of Kilpatrick-Juxta, in the deanery of Annandale, in 1539. On Thursday, 16th October, of that year, he was present at a meeting of the Dean and Chapter of Glasgow, when … Continue reading Note E. – John Layng, Rector of Kilpatrick-Juxta and Parson of Luss, pp.93-99.

Note D. – Canon Gibson and John Gibson Junior, pp.92-93.

[Notes on the Black Book Contents]    Of both Canon Gibson and John Gibson Junior, there are several notices in the Registers of Glasgow. In 1496 the former appears as Chamberlain of Glasgow, and Canon, (Reg. Episcop., Glasg., II. p. 2), and next year he is again mentioned. (Ib. II., p. 496.) On 10th May, … Continue reading Note D. – Canon Gibson and John Gibson Junior, pp.92-93.

Note C. – Decreet Respecting the Black Book of Paisley, pp.91-92.

[Notes on the Black Book Contents]    Vicesimo Nono Martij, anno 1574. Anent our souerane lordis letrez purchest at ye instance of Claud Hammiltoun, commendator of Paisley and convent thairof, aganis Robert Lord Symple, makand mentioun that quhair in ye lait trublis bi past ye said Robert Symple obtenit and gat in his handis ye … Continue reading Note C. – Decreet Respecting the Black Book of Paisley, pp.91-92.

Note B – John De Burdeus, or De Burgundia; The Pestilence, pp.79-91.

[Notes on the Black Book Contents]    John de Burdeus, de Burgundia, or cum Barba1 was a citizen of Leodium (Liege), and professor of medicine there about the middle of the fourteenth century. He was an astrologer as well as a physician, and, like Chaucer’s Doctor of Physic,2 ...   "He was grounded in Astronomye,  He … Continue reading Note B – John De Burdeus, or De Burgundia; The Pestilence, pp.79-91.

Note A. – Black Book, pp.77-79.

[Notes on the Black Book Contents]    Sir George Mackenzie does not give any authority for his statement as to the use of the term, “Black Book.” It was one in common use, but not appropriated, I think, to a monastic chronicle. The volumes in which episcopal and monastic bodies and municipal corporations copied the … Continue reading Note A. – Black Book, pp.77-79.

O Raging Fortune’s Withering Blast

[Scenery & Songs Contents] O Raging Fortune’s Withering Blast.  Words by Burns.  Air by Tam Linn.  Arranged by Finlay Dun.  -  O raging fortune’s withering blast,  Has laid my leaf full low!  O raging fortune’s withering blast,  Has laid my leaf full low.  -  My stem was fair, my bud was green,  My blossom sweet … Continue reading O Raging Fortune’s Withering Blast

Here’s a Health to ane I Lo’e Dear

[Scenery & Songs Contents] Here’s a Health to ane I Lo’e Dear.  Words by Burns.  Arranged by Finlay Dun.  -  Here’s a health to ane I lo’e dear,  Here’s a health to ane I lo’e dear;  Thou art sweet as the smile when fond lovers meet,  And soft as their parting tear, Jessie!  Although thou maun … Continue reading Here’s a Health to ane I Lo’e Dear