Of Agriculture, Trade, Diseases, Poor, State of Religion, Sepulchral Monuments, &c., Part II., pp.191-199.

THE diseases to which black cattle, in this parish, are exposed, are not numerous, and seldom fatal. For most of them Garlic is used as a sovereign remedy; and its healing virtue rarely fails. This is verified particularly in the Tail-slip, a disease which cold sometimes brings upon cows. This trouble first appears in the … Continue reading Of Agriculture, Trade, Diseases, Poor, State of Religion, Sepulchral Monuments, &c., Part II., pp.191-199.

Of Agriculture, Trade, Diseases, Poor, State of Religion, Sepulchral Monuments, &c., Part I., pp.180-190.

INSURMOUNTABLE obstacles, both from the soil and climate, will always obstruct agricultural improvements in this parish. Nearly three-fourths of the arable land is composed of a stiff clayey soil, generally incumbent on till, a substance greatly unfavourable for vegetation: it is likewise, in most place, very much exposed to under-water, and is commonly known by … Continue reading Of Agriculture, Trade, Diseases, Poor, State of Religion, Sepulchral Monuments, &c., Part I., pp.180-190.

Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part IV., pp.168-179.

THAT the sirnames of Torrance and Calderwood originated in this parish, is not improbable. Concerning the latter, the following story is handed down, by tradition, among the family of Calderwoods in the shire of Ayr. They say, “that, at a remote period, there lived at Calderwood, in Kilbride, a family of the name of Calderwood, … Continue reading Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part IV., pp.168-179.

Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part III., pp.161-168.

THE house of Torrance, which is about 5 miles south from Castelmilk, was originally a square tower of considerable height; but has, of late, by several improvements and additions, been made both commodious and elegant. The situation is high, and commands an extensive and beautifully diversified prospect to the north-west. The adjoining banks contain a … Continue reading Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part III., pp.161-168.

Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part II., pp.151-161.

THE old, and, probably, the first edifice of the Mains, stood about 70 yards north of the tower, and is now lying in ruins. The fossa within which it was inclosed is more perfect, and much larger than the one round the castle. AN aged Yew, which stands a few yards to the south-east of … Continue reading Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part II., pp.151-161.

Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part I., pp.141-150.

THE county of Lanark is commonly divided into the upper, middle, and lower wards. In the second of these divisions is situated the parish of Kilbride. It is bounded on the north by the parish of Carmunnock: on the west by Eaglesham: on the south by Loudon, Avendale, and Glassford: and on the east by … Continue reading Of the Extent of Kilbride, its Population, Places of Note, &c., Part I., pp.141-150.

Of the Parish of Rutherglen, Its Extent, Agriculture, Antiquities, Trade, &c., Part III., pp.131-138.

A small mound of earth, at Hamilton Farm, was, about 25 years ago, levelled with the ground. In the bottom of the mound was a stone coffin containing human bones.  DRUMCLAW, a small hill which stands in the middle of a plain called Drumclaw-holm, near the South-west boundary of the parish, was thought to have … Continue reading Of the Parish of Rutherglen, Its Extent, Agriculture, Antiquities, Trade, &c., Part III., pp.131-138.