Book List

Chapter XX. – A Doctor’s Mistake, pp.81-83.

COOKE, in his “Seven Narcotics,” tells a curious story of a young Spanish doctor who went from Madrid to the Philippine Islands some years since, with the design of settling in the colony and pushing his fortune by means of his profession.  On the morning after he landed, the doctor sallied forth for a walk … Continue reading Chapter XX. – A Doctor’s Mistake, pp.81-83.

Chapter XIX. – The Yankee Cruiser’s Mistake, pp.79-81.

DURING the struggle of the American colonies for their independence, a strange mistake was made by the captain of a Yankee cruiser. The mistake, and the scene that ensued, was described by an American in the following clever verses:-   “All lovers of Old England’s fame, know how the Yankee Chesapeake   Was pummelled by our … Continue reading Chapter XIX. – The Yankee Cruiser’s Mistake, pp.79-81.

Chapter XVIII. – Mistaken Identity, pp.75-79.

IN the year 1864, I had to do, indirectly, with a curious case of mistaken identity. A Scotch arm bailiff had been robbed of £60 in London by some scoundrel with whom he had been drinking in the Balmoral Arms and the Prince of Orange Tavern. The bailiff gave information of the robbery; and some … Continue reading Chapter XVIII. – Mistaken Identity, pp.75-79.

Chapter XVII. – Mistakes as to Person, pp.68-75.

THE mistaking of one person for another has often led people into very absurd positions. The proprietor of the National Hotel in Washington (Mr Guy) used to bear a striking resemblance to General Cass. During the sittings of Congress, when Cass was there, a gentleman from Baltimore, who had been put into an inferior room … Continue reading Chapter XVII. – Mistakes as to Person, pp.68-75.

Chapter XVI. – How a Mistake got an Arab a Quiet Wife, pp.66-68.

MR ORMSBY, of the Middle Temple, in an interesting volume, entitled “Autumn Rambles in North Africa,” tells the following:-  Abder-Rahman-ben-Djellah, who reigned at Tuggurt, in the region of the West Rhis, heard that in Constantina (then recently occupied by the French) there was a damsel whose beauty surpassed the most extravagant conceptions of the most … Continue reading Chapter XVI. – How a Mistake got an Arab a Quiet Wife, pp.66-68.

Chapter XV. – A Traveller’s Mistake, pp.63-66.

PAUL LOUIS COURIER relates the following story:- I was once travelling in Calabria [south-west Italy] - a land of wicked people who, I believe, hate every one, and particularly the French; the reason why would take long to tell you; suffice it to say, that they mortally hate us, and that one gets on very … Continue reading Chapter XV. – A Traveller’s Mistake, pp.63-66.

Chapter XIV. – Misapprehensions, pp.59-63.

In another class of cases the mistake results from misapprehension. When the Bishop of Oxford sent round to the churchwardens in his diocese a circular of inquiries, including the question -     “Does your officiating clergyman preach the gospel, and is his conversation and carriage consistent therewith?”  - the churchwarden of Wallingford replied -     … Continue reading Chapter XIV. – Misapprehensions, pp.59-63.

Chapter XIII. – Inadvertence and Forgetfulness, pp.57-59.

SOME odd mistakes are made through inadvertence or forgetfulness.  The old Parish Registry Act provides that any person or persons wilfully making or causing to be made false returns in the books of baptisms, burials, or marriages, being thereof lawfully convicted, shall be deemed and adjudged to be guilty of felony, and shall be transported … Continue reading Chapter XIII. – Inadvertence and Forgetfulness, pp.57-59.

Chapter XII. – Absence of Mind, pp.53-57.

MANY of these blunders in act spring from absent-mindedness.  Samuel Rogers used to tell a comical incident about Topham Beauclerk, Johnson’s friend. One day he had some friends coming to dinner, and, just before their arrival, he went up stairs to change his dress. Forgetting what he was about, he pulled off all his clothes … Continue reading Chapter XII. – Absence of Mind, pp.53-57.

Chapter XI. – Bulls, pp.49-53.

ANOTHER blunder, akin to the mixed metaphors of which we were speaking, is that known as the bull - where a proposition or an idea contradicts itself in an absurd way, and where piquancy is given to the joke by the speaker not perceiving the contradiction himself - as when the unhappy Irish baronet exclaimed … Continue reading Chapter XI. – Bulls, pp.49-53.

Chapter X. – Jumbled Metaphors and Anachronisms, pp.46-48.

ANOTHER and exceedingly common kind of slip is the jumbling together of different figures or similes, as when Lord Castlereagh said,     “I will now enter upon the fundamental feature on which this question hinges;"  or when Mr Robert Montgomery says, in the poem to which Macaulay’s criticism gave a gibbet-immortality -  “One great Enchanter … Continue reading Chapter X. – Jumbled Metaphors and Anachronisms, pp.46-48.

Chapter IX. – Blunders in Composition, pp.43-45.

ODD blunders have sometimes been made in composition by the misarrangement of clauses, as when boys’ dragons or kites were described as     “light frames covered with paper, and sent into the air by boys with tails on them.”  The tombstone at La Point, which bears the brief inscription -     "John Philips, accidentally shot … Continue reading Chapter IX. – Blunders in Composition, pp.43-45.

Chapter VIII. – Blunders from Ignorance, pp.35-42.

BLUNDERS are always more absurd when accompanied by an affectation of superior knowledge, or when made in matters with which every one is expected to be familiar.  A Canadian paper stated not long since that the Mayor of Brantfort, while reading to the Council a motion written out by one of his colleagues, broke out … Continue reading Chapter VIII. – Blunders from Ignorance, pp.35-42.

Chapter VII. – Blundering Use of Latin, Etc., pp.32-34.

OF all the blunders which people fall into from this fondness for m=words that convey an impression of scholarship, there are none that call for less compassion than blunders in the use of Latin, French, or other unassimilated words in the place of good plain English. I remember a divinity student, at a written examination, … Continue reading Chapter VII. – Blundering Use of Latin, Etc., pp.32-34.

Chapter VI. – Blundering Use of Words, pp.29-32.

ANOTHER class of mistakes arises from the misuse of words. Mrs Malaprop and Mrs Partington have furnished many illustrations, but none of them more comical than are constantly to be met with in real life.  I remember a small boy coming to ask, for a friend, is I had a book called     “The Pluerisy … Continue reading Chapter VI. – Blundering Use of Words, pp.29-32.

Chapter V. – Reading Blunders and Slips of the Tongue, pp.27-29.

ANOTHER class of blunders, of which many curious specimens could be given, are those made by illiterate persons, and by children who are only learning to read. I remember at family worship in our own house a little girl reading, when 1st Peter iv. 9 came to her turn -     “Use hospitality without girning”  … Continue reading Chapter V. – Reading Blunders and Slips of the Tongue, pp.27-29.

Chapter IV. – Mistakes in the ”Up-Tak’,” pp.24-27.

THE failure to pick up the exact words pronounced by another, or to understand what they mean, is often the result of dialectic peculiarities. There is an old story of an Aberdeen man in Edinburgh, who, when awakened during the night by the policeman’s rattle, threw up the window to ascertain where the fire was. … Continue reading Chapter IV. – Mistakes in the ”Up-Tak’,” pp.24-27.

Chapter III. – Typographical Errors, pp.20-23.

TYPOGRAPHICAL errors, caused by the carelessness of either the compositor or the proof-reader, are of constant occurrence, and many of them are very amusing.  In columns of news an absurd effect is often produced unintentionally by the running together of items that ought to have begun on different lines. In one of the leading papers … Continue reading Chapter III. – Typographical Errors, pp.20-23.

Chapter II. – Blunders in Punctuation, pp.16-19.

IT is a moral lesson on the power of “littles,” to notice how completely the alteration of the smallest punctuating mark may change the sense of a whole passage.  Recently, in an auctioneer’s list, the misplacing of a little hyphen, introduced, amongst the articles for sale,     “2000 camels’ hair-brushes”  - an item that ought … Continue reading Chapter II. – Blunders in Punctuation, pp.16-19.

Chapter I. – Telegraphic Blunders, pp.13-15.

THE telegraph does such magical work for us day by day, that its errors are apt to be forgotten in our admiration of its celerity and general accuracy.  Yet, when the wires are affected by storms, or its clerks by carelessness, the telegraph makes dreadful blunders. In one case, the mere misplacing of a point … Continue reading Chapter I. – Telegraphic Blunders, pp.13-15.

Map of Glasgow (1773)

This is another big map from a book obtained through the generous donation of our supporter, Adam Baird. It's from 'Extracts from the Records of the Burgh of Glasgow 1573-1642' (1876). This one only needed two scans to get the whole picture, then those scans were combined together again on photoshop, and that was using … Continue reading Map of Glasgow (1773)

‘Book of Blunders’ (1883)

After the surprise acquisition of Charles Waddie's 'How Scotland Lost Her Parliament' (1891) - which we've since republished - I went in search of publications by another of the authors featured, due to their correspondence to the newspapers of the time, in our publication 'Treaty of Union Articles' (2019), the Rev. David Macrae. He was … Continue reading ‘Book of Blunders’ (1883)

‘Sketch Book of the North’ (1896)

This is a nice collection of miscellany from George Eyre-Todd made up of short wee stories and anecdotes. This publication was mentioned by the author in an article for 'Scots Lore' referring to Bonnie Prince Charles' mistress Jeanie Cameron. There appeared to have been some debate as to whether she had returned to Scotland, after … Continue reading ‘Sketch Book of the North’ (1896)

‘A History of the Scottish People’ (1894)

The Maps of early Scottish territories got quite the look-in when posted to the site about a week ago. At that point I only had volume 1 of this set, from which the maps came, but went to try and find an affordable set. Here they are. I love the choice of binding. The books … Continue reading ‘A History of the Scottish People’ (1894)

‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament’ (1891)

'How Scotland Lost Her Parliament' (1891)     Orkney News Review iScot PocketMag Kindle Paperback For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – this means Paypal take a cut & I've to make up the remainder.] Please Ensure You also Contact … Continue reading ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament’ (1891)

Note F, pp.143-144.

Protest of the Scottish Home Rule Association against the present policy of Official Liberals towards Scotland.    I. The proposal to grant a Legislature and Executive Government to Ireland, and withhold them from Scotland is unjust to a loyal, industrious, patient, and intelligent people, and appears to set a premium upon disorder.    II. If … Continue reading Note F, pp.143-144.

Note E, pp.133-143.

The following extracts from an article by Sir Archibald Alison the well-known historian will show what kind of Parliament Scotland lost, and whether we have good cause to lament the want of power to manage our own affairs.     ‘A proper settlement of the Tithe question, and a distribution of the property of the church, … Continue reading Note E, pp.133-143.

Note C, pp.131-132.

It is rather a large assumption that Scotland would never have possessed colonies but for her connection with England. Had she remained a separate nation, there can be little doubt that the well-known enterprise of her people would have secured for her an honourable place in the colonial world. The most successful competitors with England … Continue reading Note C, pp.131-132.

Note A, pp.103-126.

ACT RATIFYING AND APPROVING THE TREATY OF THE TWO KINGDOMS OF SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND. January 16, 1707.    The Estates of Parliament considering that articles of Union of the Kingdoms of Scotland and England were Agreed on the 22nd of July 1706 years, by the commissioners nominated on behalf of this kingdom, under Her Majesty's … Continue reading Note A, pp.103-126.

Chapter X., pp.90-102.

The Causes of the Formation of the Map of Europe - Patriotism - Constitutional rights of a Nation - The Principle of National and Federal Government - Administrative and Executive Powers - Private Bills - Examples of Public and Private Bills - Powers of the Federal Government - Raising of the Scottish Standard and the … Continue reading Chapter X., pp.90-102.

Chapter VIII., pp.74-80.

Contention in Scotch Parliament for light taxation - Inequalities of taxation - Examples of overtaxation during the last thirty years - Loss on Government expenditure - The Union a financial loss to Scotland.   THE financial aspect of the Union of 1707 is certainly not the least important chapter in the series of events recorded … Continue reading Chapter VIII., pp.74-80.

Chapter VII., pp.58-73.

The state of the Highlands after 1745 - The lands of the people confiscated - Sheep farms bring about first clearances - Example of tyranny - Sutherland clearances - Evil effect of the new Poor Law - Deer forests and grouse moors depopulate the country.   THE lesson which the Highlanders gave the English Government … Continue reading Chapter VII., pp.58-73.

Chapter IV., pp.31-42.

Gloom and Despondency of the Scots after the Union - Trouble with Customs and Excise - Poverty and Bankruptcy of Edinburgh Merchants - Contemptuous Treatment of Scotland’s Representatives - Trouble in the Church - Jacobite Rebellion - Prince Charles takes Edinburgh.   A DEEP-SETTLED gloom fell upon Scotland after the passing of the Act of … Continue reading Chapter IV., pp.31-42.

Chapter III., pp.18-30.

The Protests of the National Party against the Treaty - Extracts from Lord Belhaven’s famous speech - Duke of Hamilton’s protest - Lockhart of Carnwath and Duke of Athole’s protests - Black-List of the bribed - Examples of true Scots.   LORD BELHAVEN made a strong protest in the Scottish Parliament against the Treaty. In … Continue reading Chapter III., pp.18-30.

‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it’ (1891)

This is a publication, one of many, that I've been dying to get my hands on. Our anonymous Patron has stepped in and made it happen! We're very excited here at RSH to find out what he has in store for us. It came to my attention during the 'Treaty of Union Articles' (2019) research. … Continue reading ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it’ (1891)

Scotland’s Elusive Unicorns

A few conversations on Twitter going on about Scotland's unicorns and why they're chained. I had previously asked my late friend Harry, see 09/04/2018 @ 23:17, about Scotland's having taken on the unicorn as the national animal. He was a heraldry professor & fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, but couldn't tell me … Continue reading Scotland’s Elusive Unicorns

Maps of Scotland in 850 & 1066 C.E., Showing Tribal Populations/Kingdoms

These go with the recently uploaded article, from the 'Scottish Review,' The Peoples of Ancient Scotland. They're taken from a book that I'll no doubt upload soon for those home-schooling during the pandemic, 'A History of the Scottish People' (1893), by the Rev. Thomas Thomson.   High- Resolution Version Rev. T. Thomson (1893), 'A History … Continue reading Maps of Scotland in 850 & 1066 C.E., Showing Tribal Populations/Kingdoms

Art. VIII. – BEGINNINGS OF THE SCOTTISH NEWSPAPER PRESS.,Vol. 21, Apr., 1893, pp.399-419.

HAVING shown how Scotland came to possess a newspaper press, which dared scarce venture beyond a slavish reproduction of English originals,1 I have now to describe with what slow and hesitating steps a native journalism emerged. It is a day of small things - of feeble aspirations and endeavours meeting with almost instant overthrow - … Continue reading Art. VIII. – BEGINNINGS OF THE SCOTTISH NEWSPAPER PRESS.,Vol. 21, Apr., 1893, pp.399-419.

Art III. – EARLY SCOTTISH BURGHS., Vol. 2, May, 1883, pp.45-70.

Ancient Laws and Customs of the Burghs of Scotland, A.D., 1124-1424. Edinburgh, 1868. Charters and Other Documents Relating to the City of Edinburgh, A.D, 1143-1540. Edinburgh, 1871. Charters and Documents Relating to the Burgh of Peebles, A.D. 1165-1621. Edinburgh, 1872. Charters and Documents relating to the City of Glasgow, A.D. 1175-1648. Edinburgh, 1883. THESE and … Continue reading Art III. – EARLY SCOTTISH BURGHS., Vol. 2, May, 1883, pp.45-70.

Art. III. – THE PEOPLES OF ANCIENT SCOTLAND., Vol. 17, Jan., 1891, pp.60-82.

Being the Fourth Rhind Lecture. IN this lecture it is proposed to make an attempt to understand the position of the chief peoples beyond the Forth at the dawn of the history of this country, and to follow that down sketchily to the organization of the kingdom of Alban. This last part of the task … Continue reading Art. III. – THE PEOPLES OF ANCIENT SCOTLAND., Vol. 17, Jan., 1891, pp.60-82.

Art. V. – SCOTTISH ORIGIN OF THE MERLIN MYTH., Vol. 20, Oct., 1892, pp.321-337.

THERE is already so much poetry and romance associated with the very name of the old Scottish Borderland that it seems superfluous in these days to seek to revive a claim which the Borderland, with its thousand and one mediaeval memories, has allowed to drop, namely, that of being the real cradle of Arthurian romance. … Continue reading Art. V. – SCOTTISH ORIGIN OF THE MERLIN MYTH., Vol. 20, Oct., 1892, pp.321-337.

Art. VII. – THE PHILOSOPHY OF STUPIDITY, Vol 6, Oct., 1885. pp.323-333.

AMONG ordinary human failings we doubt if there be one which so sorely taxes the patience and forbearance of all who are forced into constant association with it as stupidity. Most of those defects of character or disposition whereby human beings contrive to render themselves moral blisters to their fellow creatures are intermittent, stupidity is … Continue reading Art. VII. – THE PHILOSOPHY OF STUPIDITY, Vol 6, Oct., 1885. pp.323-333.

Art. II. – THE SCOTTISH LANGUAGE., Vol. 4, Jul., 1884, pp.30-61.

An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language. By JOHN JAMIESON, D.D. New Edition. Edited by    J. LONGMUIR, M.A., LL.D., and DAVID DONALDSON, F.E.I.S. Four vols. Paisley, 1879—1882. The Kingis Quair. By KING JAMES I. of Scotland. Edited by the Rev. W. W. SKEAT, M.A. Edinburgh and London, 1884. Scottish History and Literature to the period … Continue reading Art. II. – THE SCOTTISH LANGUAGE., Vol. 4, Jul., 1884, pp.30-61.

Art. IV. – THE CALDWELL PAPERS., vol. 7, Apr., 1886, pp.286-303.

Selections from the Family Papers preserved at Caldwell. Three volumes. Privately printed. Paisley: 1883-85. THE re-issue of this valuable series of Family Papers deserves more than a passing mention. Since their original publication by the Maitland Club, now upwards of thirty years ago, copies of them have become exceedingly scarce, and it is only at … Continue reading Art. IV. – THE CALDWELL PAPERS., vol. 7, Apr., 1886, pp.286-303.

Art. I. – HOME RULE FOR SCOTLAND., Vol. 8, Jul., 1886, pp.1-20.

HOME Rule is in the air. We live in an age when decentralization in government is preferred to centralisation. The tendency of the age is thoroughly healthy. It does not arise so much from a reaction against the somewhat refined notions of central government that have prevailed now for some time, as from the impotency … Continue reading Art. I. – HOME RULE FOR SCOTLAND., Vol. 8, Jul., 1886, pp.1-20.

Art. I. – ON THE JURISDICTION OF THE ENGLISH COURTS OVER SCOTSMEN., Vol. 9, Jan., 1887, pp.1-31.

BOTH in past and present times many varying views have been taken of the Treaty of Union; some agree with that conceited and sententious individual Andrew Fairservice, who attributed to the ‘sad and sorrowful Union’ every symptom of depravity or degeneracy which he remarked among his countrymen, ‘more especially the  inflammation of reckonings and the … Continue reading Art. I. – ON THE JURISDICTION OF THE ENGLISH COURTS OVER SCOTSMEN., Vol. 9, Jan., 1887, pp.1-31.

Art. I. – THE UNION OF 1707 VIEWED FINANCIALLY, Vol. 10, Oct., 1887, pp.213-234.

SUCH a difficulty as exists, or till partially removed by the prevalence of widespread agricultural depression, did exist in getting disciples of the school of the late Richard Cobden, and the late Radical but now quasi-conservative John Bright, to listen to any facts, figures, or fancies, which in the most distant manner attacked the principles … Continue reading Art. I. – THE UNION OF 1707 VIEWED FINANCIALLY, Vol. 10, Oct., 1887, pp.213-234.

‘Scottish Review’ (1886-1898)

I'll start this one with a wee bit about the Random Scottish History collection. I'll choose a book to type up and upload in order to be searchable with scans of whatever related illustrations accompany the text, in order to make these old, sometimes out of print books, easily accessible to those seeking the information. … Continue reading ‘Scottish Review’ (1886-1898)

Art. VIII. – PARLIAMENT IN SCOTLAND, Oct., 1889, Vol. 14, pp.399-416.

SOME time ago, Mr. Mitchell, the Treasurer of the Scottish Home Rule Association, wrote to me with regard to the publication of certain pamphlets. These pamphlets all related more or less to the general subject of Home Rule, and they certainly embodied the personal opinions of divers members of the Association, although it could not … Continue reading Art. VIII. – PARLIAMENT IN SCOTLAND, Oct., 1889, Vol. 14, pp.399-416.

Statutes of Icolmkill / Iona

“The Government had several modes of dealing with the feuds and unruly habits of the Highlanders,.. Sometimes, as in the Lowlands, authority was given by the Government to one party to make private was on another..; in other instances, the Crown entered into an arrangement with Argyle in the south-west, and with Huntly in the … Continue reading Statutes of Icolmkill / Iona

Chapter XIV; Mary Queen of Scots (Continued), 1560-1567, 7 Years, pp.125-143.

Mary returns to Scotland,                             1561  The queen marries Lord Darnley,                 1565  Murder of Rizzio,                                          1566  … Continue reading Chapter XIV; Mary Queen of Scots (Continued), 1560-1567, 7 Years, pp.125-143.

Chapter XIII; Mary Queen of Scots, 1542-1560, 18 Years, pp.109-124.

Accession of Mary Queen of Scots,                        1542  Hertford burns Edinburgh,                                      1544  Hertford’s second expedition,                         … Continue reading Chapter XIII; Mary Queen of Scots, 1542-1560, 18 Years, pp.109-124.

Chapter XII; James V., 1513-1542, 29 Years, pp.96-109.

Accession of James V.,                                 1513  The king’s mother marries Angus,             1514  Albany made Regent,                                   1515  Albany retires to France,                             1517  Skirmish of “Cleanse the Causeway,”        1520  Albany comes back from France,               1520  Albany brings troops from France,           1523  Albany finally leaves … Continue reading Chapter XII; James V., 1513-1542, 29 Years, pp.96-109.

Chapter IX; James II., 1437-1460, 23 Years, pp.68-77.

Accession of James II.,                                                        1437  Douglas and his brother put to death,                             1440  The king marries Mary, daughter of the Duke  of Gueldres,                                                              1449  The king kills Douglas in Stirling Castle,                          1452  Death of James II.,    … Continue reading Chapter IX; James II., 1437-1460, 23 Years, pp.68-77.

Chapter VIII; Condition of the Country During the Fourteenth and Beginning of the Fifteenth Century, pp.62-68.

    1.  The appearance of the country and the social condition of its inhabitants greatly changed during the eventful period, of about 150 years, that elapsed between the death of Alexander III. and the murder of James I. During the war of independence waged by Wallace and Bruce, the exile and captivity of David II., … Continue reading Chapter VIII; Condition of the Country During the Fourteenth and Beginning of the Fifteenth Century, pp.62-68.

Chapter VII; James I, 1406-1437, 31 years, pp.53-62.

John Reseby burned at Perth,                                  1408  Battle of Harlaw,                                                         1411  St. Andrews University founded,                             1413  Death of the Regent Albany,                                      1419  The Scots in France win the Battle of Baugè,  … Continue reading Chapter VII; James I, 1406-1437, 31 years, pp.53-62.

Chapter IV; David II., 1329-1370, 41 years, pp.32-39.

David II. crowned at Scone,                                                   1331  Randolph, the Regent, dies,                                                    1332  Battle of Dupplin - David and his queen sent to France,    1332  Battle of Halidon Hill, and recovery of Berwick by  … Continue reading Chapter IV; David II., 1329-1370, 41 years, pp.32-39.

‘A History of Scotland’ (1881)

This is a very beaten-up copy of Blackie's 'A History of Scotland' but it has good, condensed, information. It fits a lot into a wee publication. I started backwards with this one, having taken its maps for the Maps from Books section and the RSH Maps Gallery. I figured it would be useful to upload … Continue reading ‘A History of Scotland’ (1881)

Chapter I; Introduction, pp.8-13.

   1. The History of Scotland, previous to the reign of Robert Bruce, is involved in much obscurity. We know, however, that the Romans first appeared in Scotland about the year 80 B.C., that they were opposed by the Caledonians, whom, in the year 85, they defeated in the battle of Mons Grampius, and against … Continue reading Chapter I; Introduction, pp.8-13.

Armin’s ‘Nest of Ninnies’ – Jemmy Camber

   The World, wanton sick, as one surfetting on sinne (in morning pleasures, noone banquets, after riots, night moriscoes, midnights modicoms, and abundance of trash trickt up to all turbulent reuellings) is now leaning on her elbow, deuising what doctour may deliver her, what phisicke may free her, and what antidotes may antissipate so dangerous … Continue reading Armin’s ‘Nest of Ninnies’ – Jemmy Camber

Maps showing the Battles of Bannockburn (1314), Flodden (1513), and Pinkie Cleugh (1547).

This is actually an excellent wee book that's too easily overlooked in the collection, mostly for its size. It's a Student's History of Scotland and seems fairly comprehensive considering how small it is,. So I may put this one aside to upload to the site soon. These maps are fantastic wee illustrations of these three … Continue reading Maps showing the Battles of Bannockburn (1314), Flodden (1513), and Pinkie Cleugh (1547).

Vellum Affidavit of Heirship (1853)

So I obtained an interesting thing. It's a deed confirming John Baxter as the heir of James Baxter. It was pretty difficult to decipher and any remaining "[?]"s were left after the old eyes started hurting from staring at the words too long. It's handwritten in ink on vellum, which is so transparent I had … Continue reading Vellum Affidavit of Heirship (1853)

‘Poetical Works of the Ettrick Shepherd’ (1838)

I love this wee set of books. The illustrations are great but the author has a style about him that makes me want to read more. They're a bit battered, not to falling apart, but the spines have faded away and the pages, as you can see, are super foxed and have dark stains all … Continue reading ‘Poetical Works of the Ettrick Shepherd’ (1838)

December 1903

   RAILWAY ACCIDENT. - About half-past eight last night, a somewhat serious accident occurred on the Caledonian Railway near Whifflet Station. It seems that a Pole, residing in Langloan, whose name were unable to ascertain prior to going to press, had been knocked down by a passing train and rendered unconscious. The man was removed … Continue reading December 1903

November 1903

   Mishap to Railway Guard. - Yesterday morning a rather unfortunate accident befel Andrew Wilson, a guard in the employment of the North British Railway Company, residing in Edinburgh. Wilson was guard on the train that arrives at Dundee Tay Bridge Station about half-past ten. At Cupar-Fife a horsebox was attached to the train, and … Continue reading November 1903

‘Scottish Chiefs’ (1840)

This is a rather battered copy of 'Scottish Chiefs,' but the illustrations within are great and will be uploaded along with their respective chapters, when I get round to it. I think these books will make for a really interesting read and I was surprised to see it was authored by a English female historian, … Continue reading ‘Scottish Chiefs’ (1840)

‘Gazetteer of Scotland’ (1847)

I'm surprised this publication hasn't made it into any site posts yet. It's helped me out a lot in the past. These volumes gives an alphabetically listed city-by-city, town-by-town, account of Scotland. I've almost done a couple of projects based around the information in these books but other, more pressing, projects were taken on instead. … Continue reading ‘Gazetteer of Scotland’ (1847)

September 1903

HORRIBLE AFFAIR IN DUNDEE. ————— DETERMINED SUICIDE ON THE RAILWAY. ————— MAN CUT TO PIECES.    Another railway tragedy took place on the Caledonian Railway line at the west end of Dundee this morning.     The decapitated remains of a middle-aged man were found lying between the lines in the early hours of the morning.  … Continue reading September 1903

April 1903

FALL FROM A DEESIDE TRAIN. —————    On Monday Alex. Masson (40), farm servant, Peterculter, who was a passenger by the 10.45 Deeside suburban train, met with a serious accident at Pitfodels Station. Masson had booked for Cults, and when the train started from Pitfodels he imagined that he had missed his destination. He accordingly … Continue reading April 1903

March 1903

COWLAIRS TUNNEL. ————— IMPORTANT EXPERIMENTS.    A Glasgow correspondent writes:- Travellers to Glasgow by the North British Railway are well aware that the getting in and out of Queen Street Station by way of Cowlairs Tunnel is a most tedious affair, and the information that changes are in progress which will improve matters has on … Continue reading March 1903

February 1903

HIGHLAND RAILWAY SMASH. ————— TRAIN COMPLETELY WRECKED. ————— Marvellous Escape of Passengers. ————— POINTSMAN’S COOLNESS AVERTS DISASTER.    Early yesterday morning an accident occurred on the Highland Railway at Rogart Station, and which but for the coolheadedness and foresight of the pointsman might have proved to be of an appalling nature. About 5.30 a.m. a … Continue reading February 1903

November 1902

SERIOUS RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT PERTH. ————— MAN’S NARROW ESCAPE.    Shortly before three o’clock this morning a rather serious railway accident occurred at Perth General Station, when a man named Patrick Caveny, a reservist in the Highland Light Infantry, residing at 89 High Street, sustained serious injuries. About the time mentioned Caveny had been at … Continue reading November 1902