Book List

XIV. Lady Sophia Lindsay, pp.312-327.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] HE first public victim of the Restoration in Scotland was the celebrated Marquis of Argyll, who after passing scaithlessly through all the wars of the Covenant, had lived at peace during the Commonwealth. The fierce enmities and blood-feuds which the part he acted in national affairs had excited against him lay … Continue reading XIV. Lady Sophia Lindsay, pp.312-327.

XIII. Isobel Alison of Perth; and Marion Harvie of Bo’ness, pp.293-311.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents]                                                   “Every hour  They stood prepar’d to die, a people doom’d  To death; - old men, and youths, and simple maids.”                                                                                                              - Grahame’s Sabbath.  MMEDIATELY after the slaughter of Archbishop Sharp on Magus Moor, on 3rd May, 1679, the band of horsemen who slew him dispersed, and four of them … Continue reading XIII. Isobel Alison of Perth; and Marion Harvie of Bo’ness, pp.293-311.

XII. Anne Keith, Lady Methven, pp.275-292.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents]    “I have obstinacy enough to pursue whatever I have once resolved; and a true female courage to oppose anything that resist my will.” - Congreve’s Double-Dealer.  HE Civil Wars in England and Scotland developed various phases of female heroism on both sides of the quarrel. We have told the story … Continue reading XII. Anne Keith, Lady Methven, pp.275-292.

XI. – Bessie Bell and Mary Gray, pp.247-274.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] O Bessie Bell an’ Mary Gray!  They were twa bonnie lasses -  They biggit a bower on you burn-brae,  An’ theekit it ower wi’ rashes.                                                                - Old Ballad.  ARLY in 1645, the Plague appeared on the Scottish Border, after an absence of eight years, and rapidly advanced into the heart … Continue reading XI. – Bessie Bell and Mary Gray, pp.247-274.

X. The Ladies Ogilvie of Airlie, pp.221-246.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] It fell on a day, and a bonnie summer day,  When the corn grew green and yellow,  That there fell out a great dispute  Between Argyle and Airlie.                                                             - Old Ballad.  ROBABLY few of our old Scottish ballads are better known throughout the land of their birth than “The Bonnie … Continue reading X. The Ladies Ogilvie of Airlie, pp.221-246.

IX. Fair Helen of Ardoch, pp.195-220.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] Oh! grief, beyond all other griefs, when fate  First leaves the young heart lone and desolate  In the wide world, without that only tie  For which it lov’d to live - or fear’d to die; -  Lorn as the hung-up late, that ne’er hath spoken  Since the sad day its master-chord … Continue reading IX. Fair Helen of Ardoch, pp.195-220.

VIII. Margaret Campbell, Lady of Towie, pp.167-194.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “Gie up your house, ye fair lady,  Gie up your house to me;  Or I will burn yoursel’ therein,  But and your babies three.”                                                                                  - Ballad of Edom o’ Gordon.  T was in 1571, during the internecine war waged between the partisans of Queen Mary and those of her son, … Continue reading VIII. Margaret Campbell, Lady of Towie, pp.167-194.

VII. Fair Helen of Kirkconnell, pp.148-166.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] I wish I were where Helen lies,  Night and day on me she cries;  O that I were where Helen lies,  On fair Kirkconnell Lee!                                                       - Old Ballad.  HE banks of the small river Kirtle which flows through the old Annandale parish of Kirkconnell, are associated in the lyrical poesy … Continue reading VII. Fair Helen of Kirkconnell, pp.148-166.

VI. Lilliard of Ancrum, pp.134-147.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “Ancrum Moor  Ran red with English blood;  Where the Douglas true, and the bold Buccleuch,  ‘Gainst keen Lord Evers stood.”                                                                                     - Scott’s Eve of St. John.  ET love, hasty vengeance,’ quoth an old Scots proverb, which wise saw was amply exemplified by the violent measures of Bluff King Hal of … Continue reading VI. Lilliard of Ancrum, pp.134-147.

V. Janet Douglas, Lady Glamis, pp.104-133.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “Oh! we have need of patient faith below,  To clear away the mysteries of such woe!”                                                                                                        - Mrs. Heman’s Records of Women.  THINK,” says Godscroft, in beginning the prefatorial remarks to his History of Douglas and Angus, “I think it will not be amiss to place here before the door, … Continue reading V. Janet Douglas, Lady Glamis, pp.104-133.

IV. Queen Margaret Logie; and Lady Margaret Drummond, pp.75-104.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “In Inchemortho the King Davy  Weddit Dame Mergret off Logy.”                                                                                - Wyntoun’s Cronykil.  “More glorious now to trace the ancient date,  When gallant Robert held the reins of State.  Then Drummond’s daughter as his consort shone,  And added lustre to the Scottish throne;  From whom, as from the fountain of … Continue reading IV. Queen Margaret Logie; and Lady Margaret Drummond, pp.75-104.

III. Margaret Keith, Lady Lindsay, pp.67-74.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “Robert the Keith, a michty man,  .     .     .     .     .  In Formaretine at Fivy,  Assieged his aunt, a gud lady.”                                                                                - Wyntoun’s Cronykil. HE Castle of Fyvie, in the district of Buchan, is described as being “alike remarkable for its commanding situation, its antiquity, its connection with interesting events … Continue reading III. Margaret Keith, Lady Lindsay, pp.67-74.

II. Black Agnes of Dunbar, pp.37-66.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “A lady, one that arm’d  Her own fair head, and sallying through the gate,  Had beat her foes with slaughter from her walls.  .     .     .     .     .  She trampled some beneath her horses’ heels,  And some were whelm’d with missiles off the wall,  And some were push’d with lances from … Continue reading II. Black Agnes of Dunbar, pp.37-66.

‘Heroines of Scotland’ (1889)

[Scanned Images Contents] This was obtained after I was asked to provide some information about the Scottish heroine, Black Agnes, of Dunbar. I had begun by resorting to the newspapers, where I found Andrew Cheviot's weekly series, 'Black Agnes; A Romance of the Siege of Dunbar,' within the Aberdeen Weekly News dated from 3rd May, … Continue reading ‘Heroines of Scotland’ (1889)

I. Isobel, Countess of Buchan, pp.6-36.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] “Mothers henceforth shall proudly tell  How caged and prison’d Isobel  Did serve her country’s weal,”                                                                       - Pratt’s Buchan.  T was in the spring of 1297 when Wallace came into the field as champion of Scottish rights. Nine eventful years elapsed; and in the spring of 1306 Robert Bruce was crowned … Continue reading I. Isobel, Countess of Buchan, pp.6-36.

Introductory, pp.1-5.

[Heroines of Scotland Contents] HE world has been loud in its praises of heroic women,” says an anonymous writer. “They have figured in battle, reigned as queens, been hailed as deliverers, and suffered as martyrs.” Their patriotic courage and devotedness, and their prowess in war, brighten many a dark page of the world’s history, down … Continue reading Introductory, pp.1-5.

December 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents] SERIOUS RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT STANLEY.  —————  PLOUGHMAN’S TERRIBLE PLIGHT.  —————     A serious accident occurred at Stanley early on Saturday morning. On Friday a young ploughman, named George Stewart, 19 years of age, and residing with Mrs Easson, 1 Precinct Street, Coupar Angus, had been at the Perth Feeing Market, … Continue reading December 1907

November 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents] RAILWAY FATALITY AT ABERDEEN.  —————  CARRIAGE-CLEANER KILLED.  —————     A shocking accident occurred on the railway between Union Bridge and Schoolhill Station about a quarter past one o’clock yesterday afternoon, James Cumming, a railway carriage-cleaner, in the employment of the Great North of Scotland Railway Company, being run down by … Continue reading November 1907

October 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents] HOLIDAY DISASTER.  —————  GLASGOW EXCURSION TRAIN WRECKED.  —————  TERRIFIC COLLISION.  —————  FIFTY PERSONS INJURED.  —————  BRAKES FAIL TO ACT.  —————     An accident of a serious nature took place near Sunnyside Station, Coatbridge, on the North British Railway, last night shortly after nine o’clock, resulting in injuries to about fifty … Continue reading October 1907

July 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents]    FATALITY AT GARTCOSH. - On Monday a sad accident occurred in Smith and McLean’s Gartcosh Iron and Steelworks. A man named Dallington, residing at Smith Terrace, Gartcosh, and who was well-known in Coatbridge, had been crossing a line of railway in the works when he was caught between the … Continue reading July 1907

May 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents]    SUDDEN DEATH AT GALASHIELS. - Yesterday morning Mr William Skillen, coal agent, died suddenly in the lyes at the railway station. He was found lying in an unconscious state at the side of his horse and lorry. Medical assistance was called, but death ensued shortly after, being due to … Continue reading May 1907

April 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents] MAIL ROBBERY ON CALEDONIAN RAILWAY.  —————  VALUABLE PROPERTY MISSING.  —————     RAILWAY and Post Office detectives, with the co-operation of the police of Glasgow and Belfast, are investigating a daring robbery from the Irish mail train which left Glasgow for Ardrossan on Saturday night. The train runs in connection with … Continue reading April 1907

March 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents]    ACCIDENT AT RAILWAY STATION. - An accident, which might very easily have had serious consequences, occurred at Neilston [Glasgow, Barrhead & Kilmarnock] Station on Wednesday evening. Whilst a number of passengers were waiting for a down train some of the younger folks seem to have indulged in some frolics, … Continue reading March 1907

January 1907

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1907) Contents] THE ARBROATH RAILWAY DISASTER.  —————  DEATH-ROLL 21.  —————  ARREST OF THE EXPRESS DRIVER.  —————     As will be seen from a telegram which came to hand early this morning, the number of victims of the terrible railway disaster at Elliot Junction has been increased to 21.  —————  MESSAGE FROM THE … Continue reading January 1907

Living in London and Edinburgh, Saturday, November 14, 1835, pp.332-333.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] LIVING IN LONDON AND EDINBURGH.    A GOOD deal has been said and written in recent times respecting the saving of expenditure which English families may accomplish by taking up their residence in particular parts of the Continent. That the price of living is considerably lower in France, Germany, as well … Continue reading Living in London and Edinburgh, Saturday, November 14, 1835, pp.332-333.

Charming Away Diseases, Saturday, November 21, 1835, pp.342-343.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] CHARMING AWAY DISEASES.    THE London newspapers lately amused their readers with the account of an Irishman, somewhere in the metropolis, who tried to charm away the hooping-cough from his child, by passing it to his wife below the belly of a donkey. Whether this be an established usage in the … Continue reading Charming Away Diseases, Saturday, November 21, 1835, pp.342-343.

Epilogue.

[Black Agnes Contents]    There is little more to tell. Salisbury, notwithstanding his signal defeat, did not at once raise the siege, but continued to blockade and bombard the Castle for many weeks until the intrepid Countess and faithful garrison were relieved by Sir Alexander Ramsay of Dalhousie, who entered the fortress by way of … Continue reading Epilogue.

Chapter XVII. – Only Saved by the Sparkle of a Diamond Star.

[Black Agnes Contents]    No sooner were the boats secured to the iron rings attached to the stone steps of the staircase than Salisbury ordered Hepburn to land and lead the way. The young man of course had no choice but to obey the imperious command. Might is a powerful influence in securing obedience, and … Continue reading Chapter XVII. – Only Saved by the Sparkle of a Diamond Star.

Chapter XVI. – The Secret Expedition on its Way to the Castle.

[Black Agnes Contents]    The distance by sea between the English camp at the east end of Dunbar and the Castle at its northern extremity was short, but the time occupied in the brief voyage was slightly increased from the necessity of proceeding cautiously, in order to avoid the dangerous rocks, which then, as now, … Continue reading Chapter XVI. – The Secret Expedition on its Way to the Castle.

Chapter XV. – Hogmanay in the English Camp.

[Black Agnes Contents]    The conversation which Salisbury had heard between Hepburn and the messenger who passed for Home in the Judas Cell set all his doubts at rest, and he was now confident that the enterprise would succeed, and accordingly busied himself in preparations for the all important expedition. During the four weeks or … Continue reading Chapter XV. – Hogmanay in the English Camp.

Chapter XIV. – Hogmanay Night at Dunbar Castle.

[Black Agnes Contents]    Great was the delight of Home, Maxwell, and the two girls when the Countess returned safely to the Castle, and related how successfully she had outwitted the wary and experienced Earl.     “All is well so far,” explained Black Agnes. “Hepburn and I played our parts to admiration in the Judas … Continue reading Chapter XIV. – Hogmanay Night at Dunbar Castle.

Chapter XIII. – The Judas Slit in Dunbar Jail.

[Black Agnes Contents]    It may appear to those who do not understand the ancient methods of dealing with prisoners that Lord Salisbury was somewhat rash in agreeing to accept a stranger’s assurance of what took place at a private interview between him and a prisoner as a guarantee of the latter’s fidelity. But, as … Continue reading Chapter XIII. – The Judas Slit in Dunbar Jail.

Chapter XII. – Black Agnes Before the Earl of Salisbury.

[Black Agnes Contents]    “Who are you?” asked Salisbury, “and why has Betsy Hepburn not returned here as she promised? She has been long in sending me a message. I was beginning to think that the lads in the Castle suited her so well that she had forgotten her man in my prison. Zounds, you … Continue reading Chapter XII. – Black Agnes Before the Earl of Salisbury.

Chapter XI. – The Castle Messenger Arrives at the English Camp.

[Black Agnes Contents]    Meanwhile Salisbury had been fuming and fretting at the delay, and making things exceedingly unpleasant for his unhappy prisoner. Again and again Hepburn was brought before the Earl, and closely questioned as to the warders, guards, fortifications, and other safeguards of the Castle, and dire was the vengeance threatened should Betsy … Continue reading Chapter XI. – The Castle Messenger Arrives at the English Camp.

Chapter X. – A Messenger from the Castle to Visit the Camp of the Enemy.

[Black Agnes Contents]    Black Agnes pondered long and anxiously how to derive the greatest advantage from the startling stories she had heard from Betsy Hepburn. Thanks to the faithfulness of Hepburn and his wife, the Castle would incur no risk of capture from Salisbury’s treacherous proposal, for the Countess was now on the alert … Continue reading Chapter X. – A Messenger from the Castle to Visit the Camp of the Enemy.

Chapter IX. – A Cannonade in the Olden Time.

[Black Agnes Contents]    Although Lord Salisbury believed that the negotiations he had set on foot by the agency of Betsy Hepburn would speedily lead to the capture of the Castle, yet the attacks on the outer walls and inner buildings, feeble and ineffective though they proved, were never suspended even for a single day. … Continue reading Chapter IX. – A Cannonade in the Olden Time.

Chapter VIII. – How Betsy Fulfilled Her Mission.

[Black Agnes Contents]    Notwithstanding her apparent anger with Adam Home for marrying Elsie Purves without permission, Lady Dunbar was really highly pleased with the spirited conduct of the young man in volunteering for the dangerous service of assisting in the defence of the sore beset stronghold, and no sooner had she dismissed him to … Continue reading Chapter VIII. – How Betsy Fulfilled Her Mission.

Chapter VII. – Hepburn and Betsy Agree to Betray the Castle to Lord Salisbury.

[Black Agnes Contents]    When the young couple again appeared before Lord Salisbury, they lost no time in apprising his Lordship that it was to be as he wished, provided means could be found for executing the treacherous project.     “I dinna like the job,” said Hepburn, “but what maun be maun be. It’s a … Continue reading Chapter VII. – Hepburn and Betsy Agree to Betray the Castle to Lord Salisbury.

Chapter VI. – How it Befel Hepburn and His Bride.

[Black Agnes Contents]    As Adam Home suggested to Ronald Maxwell, the warder, their friend Robert Hepburn and his newly-made bride had fallen into the hands of the Philistines as they were within an arrow flight almost of the sure refuge to which they were happening. When Hepburn’s horse fell - struck by the sentinel’s … Continue reading Chapter VI. – How it Befel Hepburn and His Bride.

Chapter I. – Hallowe’en at Wedderburn Castle.

[Black Agnes Contents]    It was a gay and merry company which gathered round the glowing peat fire in the old Castle of the Homes at Wedderburn on the Hallowe’en of 1338. Since the widely-lamented death of the heroic King Robert the Bruce, nine years before, the old turmoils at home and troubles with the … Continue reading Chapter I. – Hallowe’en at Wedderburn Castle.

Chapter V. – How Adam and Elsie were Received by Black Agnes.

[Black Agnes Contents]    “Who are you?” inquired the warder when Adam sprang from his horse, and assisted his wife to alight. “Who are you? I ask, and where is my comrade Hepburn? Speak, man, I say, else I will brain you where you stand with my halberd.”     “Ca canny, man, ca canny,” quietly … Continue reading Chapter V. – How Adam and Elsie were Received by Black Agnes.

Chapter IV. – The Castle of Dunbar and its Mistress.

[Black Agnes Contents]    The Castle of Dunbar is now a ruin, and from the few weather-beaten walls which the lapse of ages, the inroads of the waves, and the artillery of successive besiegers have suffered to remain, little idea can be formed of its former renown and ancient magnificence, though even yet broken and … Continue reading Chapter IV. – The Castle of Dunbar and its Mistress.

Chapter III. – A Night Ride to Dunbar.

[Black Agnes Contents]    At the period of our story, and for hundreds of years afterwards, the forms of locomotion in Scotland were alike primitive and few. Travellers to Dunbar at that time had not the “Flying Scotsman” of to-day to birl them along at the rate of sixty miles an hour, the fast mail … Continue reading Chapter III. – A Night Ride to Dunbar.

Chapter II. – A Double Marriage in Wedderburn Castle.

[Black Agnes Contents] Elsie Purves, who had been brought up in the service of the Countess of Dunbar, and now filled the responsible position of principal tirewoman to that great lady, was, at the Hallowe’en season our story opens, on a visit to her old friends, the parents of Adam Home, at their comfortable farmhouse … Continue reading Chapter II. – A Double Marriage in Wedderburn Castle.

Greyfriars’ Cemetery, Edinburgh, Saturday, May 2, 1835, pp.109-111.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] GREYFRIARS' CEMETERY, EDINBURGH.    THE principal burial-ground in the Scottish capital is one situated in the southern quarter of the city, and which forms the precinct of the Greyfriars’ churches. Previously to the Reformation, the greater part of this ground was a garden connected with a kind of school or college, … Continue reading Greyfriars’ Cemetery, Edinburgh, Saturday, May 2, 1835, pp.109-111.

Book the Fourth, pp.245-400.

[General History of Scotland Contents] From the Acceʃʃion of MALCOLM CANMORE, to the Death of ALEXANDER III. in the Year 1285.    IT is to the Engliʃh hiʃtorians that we are chiefly indebted for the hiʃtory of Scotland, at this remarkable period. Fordun is angry with William of Malmʃbury, for aʃcribing the glory of Malcolm’s … Continue reading Book the Fourth, pp.245-400.

Book the Third, pp.157-244.

[General History of Scotland Contents] From the Death of KENNETH MAC-ALPIN, to the Acceʃʃion of MALCOLM CAINMMORE, in 1054.     THE difference among the Scots writers concerning the hiʃtory and character of Donald, who ʃucceeded his brother Kenneth Mac-Alpin in the throne, ought to caution us againʃt placing any implicit faith in the hiʃtories of … Continue reading Book the Third, pp.157-244.

Book the Second, pp.95-156.

[General History of Scotland Contents] From the Eʃtabliʃhment of that Monarchy, under FERGUS, the Son of ERTH, to the Death of KENNETH MACALPIN, in 855.     NENNIUS the oldeʃt and moʃt unexceptionable hiʃtorian of Britiʃh affairs, as confined to this iʃland, gives ʃuʃʃicient evidence that the Iriʃh and the Britiʃh Scots were a diʃtinct people, … Continue reading Book the Second, pp.95-156.

Book the First, pp.25-94.

[General History of Scotland Contents]    FERGUS, commonly called the firʃt king of Scotland, ʃaid to have reigned three hundred and thirty years before the Incarnation, is reported to have been by birth an Iriʃhman; and we are told, that the inhabitants of Ireland were then called Scots. Be this as it may, the authors … Continue reading Book the First, pp.25-94.

Introduction, pp.1-23.

[General History of Scotland Contents]    I SHALL, without adopting any particular ʃyʃtem hitherto published, lay before my readers the earlieʃt accounts which have come to our hands of the inhabitants of SCOTLAND.     Several histories of Scotland have advanced circumstances, ʃome not only beyond all credibility, but impoʃʃible, in the nature of things, ʃuppoʃing … Continue reading Introduction, pp.1-23.

November 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR DUNBAR.  —————  SCOTTISH EXPRESS RUNS INTO TRUCKS.  —————  MARVELLOUS ESCAPE FROM DISASTER.     About 11 o’clock last night, the Scottish express, known as “The London Diner,” which left King’s Cross at 2.20 p.m., narrowly escaped disaster at East Fortune, owing to uncoupled waggons, which had been derailed, … Continue reading November 1906

‘General History of Scotland’ (1767)

[Scanned Images Contents] I was originally only able to obtain volume 2 of this set, though, recently, an extremely generous Patron. sent me volume 1. So, that's our next priority for upload. It's one I've been excited to get into and it's wonderful to have the chance already. This is William Guthrie’s ‘General History of … Continue reading ‘General History of Scotland’ (1767)

October 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] RAILWAY FATALITY NEAR DUMFRIES.     Dumfries, Saturday. - About half-past six o’clock this morning Sam. Taylor, driver of an engine returning from Castle-Douglas, found the dead body of a man lying on the up line opposite Lochside, about a mile west of Dumfries. The head rested on the rails, and … Continue reading October 1906

September 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents]    NIGHT WATCHMAN KILLED. - An accident, which has terminated fatally, occurred about two o’clock on Saturday to William Ballantyne, night-watchman at the North Saw Mills, who resided at Glenthorn, Glensburgh. The accident happened while some shunting operations were going on in the mill. From the deceased’s own story it … Continue reading September 1906

August 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents]    FATAL ACCIDENT AT NEWBATTLE. - James Tully, a banksman employed by the Lothian Coal Company (Limited), Newbattle, was fatally injured in the railway sidings at the Lady Victoria colliery yesterday, several waggons which were being shunted knocking him down as he was crossing the railway lines. Tully, who was … Continue reading August 1906

July 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] PERTH STATION SMASH.     A rather unfortunate railway mishap occurred on the main line at Perth General Station this morning, and, although no person was injured, the accident put the railway officials to a considerable amount of inconvenience. While the passenger train from the Alyth district, which arrives in Perth … Continue reading July 1906

June 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents]    ACCIDENT. - Alexander Birse, carter, Queen Street, was working in the Caledonian Railway goods yard on Monday night, when he was caught between the horse-chain and the buffer of the waggon which his horse was drawing. Dr Connon found that two ribs had been broken, and ordered the injured … Continue reading June 1906

May 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] RAILWAY FATALITY AT LEITH.     A surfaceman, named George Dryburgh Wilson (46), in the employment of the North British Railway Company, and residing at 25 Annfield, Newhaven, was instantaneously killed this morning in the tunnel between Junction Bridge and North Leith Stations, where he was knocked down and run over by … Continue reading May 1906

April 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] SERIOUS RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR KIRTLEBRIDGE.  —————  ONE PASSENGER KILLED AND SEVERAL INJURED.  —————     A serious railway accident occurred about nine o’clock last night on the Caledonian main line between Kirtle bridge and Ecclefechan. The train, which was the 2.10 express from London to Glasgow, was travelling at nearly seventy … Continue reading April 1906

March 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents] FATAL RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT LEITH.  AN UNFORTUNATE FAMILY.     Last night an accident whereby William McIntosh, 15 years of age, son of a widow, residing at 24 Burlington Street, Leith, lost his life, occurred on the railway near the Citadel Station. McIntosh was employed by the North British Railway Company … Continue reading March 1906

January 1906

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1906) Contents]    SEASONABLE GIFTS. - By the kindness of Lord Leith of Fyvie, handsome presents of pheasants, hares, and rabbits have been distributed to the drivers, firemen, guards, and brakesmen on the Macduff section of the Great North of Scotland Railway, and also to each of the staff and waymen at … Continue reading January 1906

December 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] NARROW ESCAPE AT EDZELL RAILWAY STATION.  —————     An accident which, but for the promptitude of Railway Guard J. Duncan, would have had very serious results, occurred at Edzell station on Saturday afternoon. The 2.55 train from Brechin had just arrived, and the carriages had been uncoupled from the engine … Continue reading December 1905

November 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    COLLISION ON THE DUMBARTONSHIRE AND BALLOCH JOINT RAILWAY. - Yesterday morning a collision occurred on the Dumbarton and Balloch Joint Railway Line, between Balloch and Balloch Pier. The 5.25 A.M. workmen’s train from Bridgeton Cross, Glasgow, was proceeding from Balloch to the pier, and when crossing over into the … Continue reading November 1905

October 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] ACCIDENT AT CULTER STATION.     An accident occurred at Culter Station on Saturday morning whereby a fireman named William McPherson, residing at Woodside, narrowly escaped with his life. While the train leaving Aberdeen at 7.10 a.m. was proceeding through the station he was on the top of the tender of … Continue reading October 1905

‘Circle of Human Life’ (1847)

[Scanned Images Contents] My attention was brought to this book by a YouTube video by Storied entitled 'The Macabre Origins of the Grim Reaper,' featuring our favourite mortician, Caitlin Doughty, from the Order of the Good Death. Those who know me won't be in any way surprised by that introductory sentence. This is a publication … Continue reading ‘Circle of Human Life’ (1847)

Chapter 43 – George Heriot’s Hospital and the Greyfriars Church., pp.363-384.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Notice of George Heriot - Dies Childless - His Will - The Hospital founded - Its Progress - The Master Masons - Opened - Number of Scholars - Dr. Balcanquall - Alterations - The Edifice - The Architecture of it - Heriot’s Day and Infant Schools in the City - … Continue reading Chapter 43 – George Heriot’s Hospital and the Greyfriars Church., pp.363-384.

Chapter 42 – Lauriston., pp.355-363.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The New University Buildings - The Estimates and Accommodation - George Watson’s Hospital - Founded - Opened and Sold - The New Royal Infirmary - Its Capabilities for Accommodation - Simpson Memorial Hospital - Sick Children’s Hospital - Merchant Maiden Hospital - Watson’s Schools - Lauriston United Presbyterian Church - … Continue reading Chapter 42 – Lauriston., pp.355-363.

Chapter 41 – Hope Park End., pp.349-355.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] “The Douglas Cause,” or Story of Lady Jane Douglas-Stewart - Hugh Lord Semple - “The Chevalier” - The Archers’ Hall - Royal Company of Archers formed - Their Jacobitism - Their Colours - Early Parades - Constitution and Admission - Their Hall built - Messrs. Nelsons’ Establishment - Thomas Nelson.  … Continue reading Chapter 41 – Hope Park End., pp.349-355.

‘Confessions of an Opium Eater’ (1890s)

[Non-Scottish Publications Contents] This is a book I had borrowed from a friend and read as a teenager, though that edition was far more contemporary than that before you in this post. That publication's title had the qualifier of the author's nationality, i.e., 'Confessions of an English Opium Eater.' It and its author, Thomas de … Continue reading ‘Confessions of an Opium Eater’ (1890s)

Chapter 40 – George Square and the Vicinity., pp.338-348.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Ross House - The last Lord Ross - Earlier Residents in the Square - House of Walter Scott, W.S. - Sir Walter’s Boyhood - Bickers - Green Breeks - The Edinburgh Light Horse - The Scots Brigade - Admiral Duncan - Lord Advocate Dundas - The Grants of Kilgraston - … Continue reading Chapter 40 – George Square and the Vicinity., pp.338-348.

Chapter 39 – Nicolson Street and Square., pp.334-338.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Lady Nicolson - Her Pillar - Royal Riding School - M. Angelo - New Surgeons’ Hall - The Earl of Leven - Dr. Borthwick Gilchrist - The Blind Asylum - John Maclaren - Sir David Wilkie - Roxburgh Parish - Lady Glenorchy's Chapel.  NICOLSON STREET, which runs southward to the … Continue reading Chapter 39 – Nicolson Street and Square., pp.334-338.

Chapter 38 – Bristo and the Potterrow., pp.323-334.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Bristo Street - The Darien House - The Earl of Rosebery - Old Charity Workhouse - A Strike in 1764 - Old George Inn - U. P. Church - Dr. Peddie - Sir Walter Scott’s First School - The General’s Entry and the Dalrymples of Stair - Burns and Clarinda … Continue reading Chapter 38 – Bristo and the Potterrow., pp.323-334.

Chapter 37 – Arthur’s Seat and its Vicinity., pp.303-322.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The Sanctuary - Geology of the Hill - Origin of its Name, and that of the Craigs - The Park Walls, 1554 - A Banquet al fresco - The Pestilence - A Duel - “The Guttit Haddie” - Mutiny of the Old 78th Regiment - Proposed House on the Summit … Continue reading Chapter 37 – Arthur’s Seat and its Vicinity., pp.303-322.

Chapter 36 – The Old Royal Infirmary – Surgeon Square., pp.297-303.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The Old Royal Infirmary - Projected in time of George I. - The First Hospital Opened - The Royal Charter - Second Hospital Built - Opened 1741 - Size and Constitution - Benefactors’ Patients - Struck by Lightning - Chaplain’s Duties - Cases in the Present Day - The Keith … Continue reading Chapter 36 – The Old Royal Infirmary – Surgeon Square., pp.297-303.

Chapter 35 – Infirmary Street and the Old High School., pp.284-296.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Blackfriars Monastery - Its Foundation - Destroyed by Fire - John Black the Dominican - The Friary Gardens - Lady Yester: her Church and Tomb - The Burying Ground - The Old High School - The Ancient Grammar School - David Vocat - School Founded - Hercules Rollock - Early … Continue reading Chapter 35 – Infirmary Street and the Old High School., pp.284-296.

Chapter 34 – Lord Provosts of Edinburgh., pp.277-284.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The First Magistrate of Edinburgh - Some noted Provosts - William de Dederyk, Alderman - John Wigmer and the Ransom of David II. - John of Quhitness, First Provost - William Bertraham - The Golden Charter - City Pipers - Archibald Bell-the-cat - Lord Home - Arran and Kilspindie - … Continue reading Chapter 34 – Lord Provosts of Edinburgh., pp.277-284.

Chapter 33 – The Society., pp.267-276.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The Candlemaker Row - The “Cunzie Nook” - Time of Charles I. - The Candlemakers’ Hall - The Affair of Dr. Symons - The Society, 1598 - Brown Square - Proposed Statue to George III., 1764 - Distinguished Inhabitants - Sir Islay Campbell - Lord Glenlee - Haig of Beimerside … Continue reading Chapter 33 – The Society., pp.267-276.

Show and Tell (Originally Patron-only)

[RSH Videos Contents] - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9g44PUv92kw https://youtu.be/KGoZXez9fj4 https://youtu.be/gdKh0d3KJ8g https://youtu.be/u9rOMmOYSzc https://youtu.be/mW5-I0EUFN0 https://youtu.be/8ZOKgIqy9Y0 https://youtu.be/rbmnqYIQ_oQ https://youtu.be/mPr89Z7RHfE https://youtu.be/NTtE6bds5mg https://youtu.be/xVZb5fZXgcM Bonus Show & Tell https://youtu.be/ZSAajVq6HZo https://youtu.be/TupcIgoxJxA https://youtu.be/rs_4g3QtPRo

How Scotland Lost Her Parliament Readings

[RSH Videos Contents] - https://youtu.be/JM4wJ1BXwZ0 https://youtu.be/m_vEj5NiJlg https://youtu.be/29jB7j1MI7w https://youtu.be/Ba8vauHm47o https://youtu.be/cMg4W0U4gAk https://youtu.be/o54ebZ_FFYo https://youtu.be/jiR6tRgdvug https://youtu.be/RpMlKooshNY https://youtu.be/YDyj3NnbnkE https://youtu.be/u2v4QwSv3Zw https://youtu.be/_OB0itvLvtE https://youtu.be/XAcGS7Ud6og https://youtu.be/ZdiJBwpsUWE https://youtu.be/qKw8agONWbA https://youtu.be/OftncTrELWk https://youtu.be/lxHqN5WKBbw https://youtu.be/eMN8HUzCxZg https://youtu.be/88oFQcm5QiA

Treaty of Union Articles Readings

[RSH Videos Contents] - https://youtu.be/aHbYwJX7IkY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rfndCDv0xM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3MY6c9IMn8 https://youtu.be/NYp95DF-ecg https://youtu.be/BlITAKcnEsY https://youtu.be/ng7BHdLF1go https://youtu.be/57gP3bhXWBw https://youtu.be/mE6Tp3q6Fsk https://youtu.be/bAlKK8EOzfk https://youtu.be/ubahrx6KYjE https://youtu.be/iLaYuzZenIY https://youtu.be/yQXmjpYV0b8 https://youtu.be/fBv76DnQn0c https://youtu.be/kpIwIWH0ZG4 https://youtu.be/2t8j_RrbJGo https://youtu.be/2cmj4eWhPSo https://youtu.be/STS6UH9Jta8 https://youtu.be/82Ww-DDV4qQ https://youtu.be/bb3qSPhxLd8 https://youtu.be/R6vctCUvI8I

Chapter 32 – The Cowgate (concluded)., pp.250-267.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The South Side of the Street - The High School Wynd - “Claudero” - Robertson’s Close - House of the Bishops of Dunkeld - Tomb of Gavin Douglas - Kirk-of-Field and College Wynd - House of the Earls of Queensberry - Robert Monteith - Oliver Goldsmith - Dr. Joseph Black … Continue reading Chapter 32 – The Cowgate (concluded)., pp.250-267.

Chapter 31 – The Cowgate., pp.238-249.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The Cowgate - Origin and General History of the Thoroughfare - First Houses built there - The Vernour’s Tenement - Alexander Alesse - Division of the City in 1512 - “Dichting the Calsay” in 1518 - The Cowgate Port - Beggars in 1616 - Gilbert Blakhal - Names of the … Continue reading Chapter 31 – The Cowgate., pp.238-249.

Chapter 30 – The Grassmarket., pp.230-238.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The Grassmarket - The Mart of 1477 - Margaret Tudor - Noted Executions - “Half Hangit Maggie Dickson” - Italian Mountebanks - Grey Friary Founded by James I. - Henry VI. of England a Fugitive - The Grey Friars Port - New Corn Exchange - The White Horse Inn - … Continue reading Chapter 30 – The Grassmarket., pp.230-238.

Chapter 29 – West Port., pp.221-230.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] The West Port - Its Boundaries - Malefactors’ Heads - The City Gates - Royal Entrances - Mary of Guise - Anne of Denmark - Charles I. - General Assembly Expelled - A Witch - Jesuit Church - The Lawsons of the Highriggs - Lady Lawson’s Wynd - The Tilting … Continue reading Chapter 29 – West Port., pp.221-230.

Chapter 28 – The Western Town – Haymarket – Dalry – Fountainbridge., pp.209-221.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Maitland Street and Shandwick Place - The Albert Institute - Last Residence of Sir Walter Scott in Edinburgh - Lieutenant-General Dundas - Melville Street - Patrick F. Tytler - Manor Place - St. Mary’s Cathedral - The Foundation Laid - Its Size and Aspect - Opened for Service - The … Continue reading Chapter 28 – The Western Town – Haymarket – Dalry – Fountainbridge., pp.209-221.

Chapter 27 – The Northern New Town (concluded)., pp.198-209.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Admiral Fairfax - Bishop Terrot - Brigadier Hope - Sir T. M. Brisbane - Lord Meadowbank-Ewbank the R.S.A. - Death of Professor Wilson - Moray Place and its District - Lord President Hope - The Last Abode of Jeffrey - Baron Hume and Lord Moncrieff - Forres Street - Thomas … Continue reading Chapter 27 – The Northern New Town (concluded)., pp.198-209.

Chapter 26 – The Northern New Town., pp.185-198.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Picardy Place - Lords Eldin and Craig - Sir David Milne - John Abercrombie - Lord Newton - Commissioner Osborne - St. Paul’s Church - St. George’s Chapel - William Douglas, Artist - Professor Playfair - General Scott of Bellevue - Drummond Place - C.K. Sharpe of Hoddam - Lord Robertson … Continue reading Chapter 26 – The Northern New Town., pp.185-198.

Chapter 25 – The Village and Barony of Broughton., pp.180-185.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Broughton - The Village and Barony - The Loan - Broughton first mentioned - Feudal Superiors - Witches Burned - Leslie’s Headquarters - Gordon of Ellon’s Children Murdered - Taken Red Hand - Tolbooth of the Burgh - The Minute Books - Free Burgesses - Modern Churches erected in the Bounds … Continue reading Chapter 25 – The Village and Barony of Broughton., pp.180-185.

Chapter 24 – Elder Street – Leith Street – Broughton Street., pp.176-179.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Elder Street - Leith Street - The old “Black Bull” - Margarot - The Theatre Royal - Its Predecessors on the same Site - The Circus - Corri’s Rooms - The Pantheon - Caledonian Theatre - Adelphi Theatre - Queen’s Theatre and Opera House - Burned and Rebuilt - St. … Continue reading Chapter 24 – Elder Street – Leith Street – Broughton Street., pp.176-179.

Chapter 23 – Charlotte Square., pp.172-173.

[Old & New Edinburgh Contents] Charlotte Square - Its Early Occupants - Sir John Sinclair, Bart. - Lamond of that Ilk - Sir William Fettes - Lord Chief Commissioner Adam - Alexander Dirom - St George’s Church - The Rev. Andrew Thomson - Prince Consort’s Memorial - The Parallelogram of the first New Town.     … Continue reading Chapter 23 – Charlotte Square., pp.172-173.