Book List

Chapter V. – Part 1 – On Scottish Stories of Wit and Humour, pp.177-215.

[Reminiscences Contents]    We find in the conversation of old people frequent mention of parochial functionaries, now either become commonplace, like the rest of the world, or removed altogether, and shut up in poor-houses or mad-houses - I mean parish idiots - eccentric, or somewhat crazy, useless, idle creatures, who used to wander from house … Continue reading Chapter V. – Part 1 – On Scottish Stories of Wit and Humour, pp.177-215.

Chapter V. – Part 1 – On Scottish Stories of Wit and Humour, pp.139-177.

[Reminiscences Contents] HE portion of our subject, which we proposed under the head of “Reminiscences of Scottish Stories of Wit or Humour,” yet remains to be considered. This is closely connected with the question of Scottish dialect and expressions; indeed, on some points hardly separable, as the wit, to a great extent, proceeds from the … Continue reading Chapter V. – Part 1 – On Scottish Stories of Wit and Humour, pp.139-177.

Chapter IV. – On Humour Proceeding from Scottish Language, Including Scottish Proverbs, pp.60-138.

[Reminiscences Contents] E come next to reminiscences chiefly connected with peculiarities which turned upon our Scottish LANGUAGE, whether contained in words or in expressions. Now this is a very important change, and affects in a greater degree than many persons would imagine, the general modes and aspects of society. I suppose at one time the … Continue reading Chapter IV. – On Humour Proceeding from Scottish Language, Including Scottish Proverbs, pp.60-138.

‘Prospects and Observances; on a Tour in England and Scotland’ (1791)

[Non-Scottish Publications Contents] I treated myself to this publication as I'm a sucker for engaved illustrations. The author, as it would appear from his dedication alone, is a devout monarchist and Englishman, with the usual prejudices and misconceptions about Scotland that come from an 18th century person of his ilk. I'm sure it'll make for … Continue reading ‘Prospects and Observances; on a Tour in England and Scotland’ (1791)

Chapter III. – On the Old Scottish Domestic Servant, pp.45-59.

[Reminiscences Contents] E come now to a subject on which a great change has taken place in this country during my own experience. I allude to the third division which we proposed of these desultory remarks, viz., those peculiarities of intercourse which some years back marked the connection between masters and servants. In many Scottish … Continue reading Chapter III. – On the Old Scottish Domestic Servant, pp.45-59.

Chapter II. – On Old Scottish Conviviality, pp.21-44.

[Reminiscences Contents] HE next change in manners which has been effected in the memory of many now living, regards the habits of conviviality, or, to speak more plainly, regards the banishment of drunkenness from polite society. It is indeed a most important and a blessed change. But it is a change the full extent of … Continue reading Chapter II. – On Old Scottish Conviviality, pp.21-44.

Chapter I. – On Religious Feelings and Religious Observances, pp.1-20.

[Reminiscences Contents] N this subject we would speak with deference. We have no intention of entering, in this volume, upon those great questions which are connected with recent church movements amongst us, or with national peculiarities of faith and discipline. It is impossible, however, to overlook entirely the fact of a gradual relaxation having gone … Continue reading Chapter I. – On Religious Feelings and Religious Observances, pp.1-20.

Introduction, pp.xv-xxiv.

[Reminiscences Contents] ANY things connected with the Scottish manners of former times are fast becoming obsolete, and we seem at present to be placed in a juncture when some Scottish traditions may be lost entirely, if not now preserved. Being impressed with this truth, I made my own “Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character” the … Continue reading Introduction, pp.xv-xxiv.

Preface to the Seventh Edition, pp.ix-xiv.

[Reminiscences Contents] N the Sixth Edition of the “REMINISCENCES OF SCOTTISH LIFE AND CHARACTER” a considerable number of fresh anecdotes were introduced from various sources, whilst some of those already adopted were corrected. In further illustration of the drinking system, now fortunately obsolete in Scottish society, some details were given regarding the toasts and sentiments … Continue reading Preface to the Seventh Edition, pp.ix-xiv.

Dedication, pp.vii-viii.

[Reminiscences Contents] TO THE MOST HONOURABLE  JAMES ANDREW MARQUIS OF DALHOUSIE,  K.T., P.C., &c. &c.    MY DEAR LORD DALHOUSIE,     I beg permission to dedicate to you in its more enlarged form, a collection of national peculiarities which has grown up to many times the size of the original lecture with which it commenced. … Continue reading Dedication, pp.vii-viii.

‘Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character’ (1861)

[Scanned Images Contents] I thought this might prove an interesting publication to type up for the interested. I figured it might give us a glimpse into the ways and means of life of those who've come before. Edmonston and Douglas were fairly prolific publishers having appeared on a number of differing publications in the RSH … Continue reading ‘Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character’ (1861)

Glaistigs, &c.

[Newspaper Research Contents] MAC IAN CHIER.     ARCHIBALD MACDONALD, commonly known by the above patronymic, was perhaps the most perfect master of his hazardous profession [cattle-lifter] of any who ever practised it Archibald was by birth a gentleman, and proprietor of a small estate in Argyleshire, which he, however, lost early in life...      … Continue reading Glaistigs, &c.

Brownies, Fairies, &c.

[Newspaper Research Contents] CALEDONIA.  —————  WILD, romantick, happy isle,  Still thou woos me with a smile,  Still, the sward with daisies spread  Seems to blossom ‘neath my tread;  And thy hills before me rise,  And thy vallies meet mine eyes,  And thy streams salute mine ear,  And thy songs I stop to hear,  And the … Continue reading Brownies, Fairies, &c.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XXI. – Untitled.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    ON looking over my MS. volumes I find a number of scraps in the shape of verses, some of which have long existed as household words, but which, like many of the things of the olden time, are fast gliding into the shades of oblivion. Many of these are the … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XXI. – Untitled.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XX. – Miscellaneous.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents] 1. EDNAM.     THE Chronicles of Coldingham say that in the reign of Edgar, Edenhim and Swinton were in a waste and desert state.     Malcolm Canmore, in 1159, granted out of the milne of Ednam twelve chalders of oats yearly to the monks of Kelso. David I. granted it at … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XX. – Miscellaneous.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. XIX. – The Deil.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    THE foul fiend, as he was not inappropriately designated by our covenanting ancestors, played so distinguished a part in the drama of superstition, that it would be unpardonable were I to pass him by without deigning at least a cursory notice. Itis right, at the outset, to remind the reader, … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. XIX. – The Deil.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVIII. – Miscellaneous.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    1. Powries or Dunters were spirits that inhabited old castles, peels, towers, dungeons, &c. They make a noise as if they were beating flax or knocking barley in the hollow of a stone, and this noise, whenever it was more than usually loud and longer continued, was a monitor to … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVIII. – Miscellaneous.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVII. – Mummers or Guizards.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    THE word mummer and guizard [guiser] have nearly the same signification. They are both from the Saxon, and mean a masker, or one disguised under a visard. It seems certain that the mummers of England and the guizards of the Borders of Scotland present in some degree a shadow of … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVII. – Mummers or Guizards.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVI. – Miscellaneous.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents] 1. ORDEALS.     The Egg Ordeal was employed for the purpose of trying those suspected of theft. A large basin full of water, and a vessel containing some eggs, were placed before the suspected person, who selected an egg and dropped it into the water. If it sank he was acquitted; … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XVI. – Miscellaneous.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XV. – Miscellaneous.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents] 1. TRADITION OF ROXBURGH CASTLE.     WHEN the strong castle of Roxburgh remained in the hands of the English, a party of the Scots belonging to the Douglas dressed themselves in the skins of oxen, and, under this disguise, they succeeded in getting into a field of Springwood Park, in the … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XV. – Miscellaneous.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XIV. – Divinations.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    PERHAPS some of my readers may be disposed to enquire - What is the difference between omens and divinations? They have the same object in view. They both aim at lifting the veil from futurity, though not in the way. An omen is accidental; it may be derived the croaking … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XIV. – Divinations.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XIII. – Miscellaneous.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    1. The Still-Born Baby. When a child is still-born - i.e., one who never saw the sun - he is buried the same evening afterward, as near to the north wall of the church as it is possible to dig a grave, in order to prevent people from stepping over … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XIII. – Miscellaneous.

‘Timeline of Events Between Scotland & England’ (2021)

‘Timeline of Events Between Scotland & England‘ (Dec., 2021) Paperback Kindle For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal for a Paperback No Further Payment for Postage Required. [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – this means Paypal take a cut & I’ve to make up the remainder.] … Continue reading ‘Timeline of Events Between Scotland & England’ (2021)

‘Scotland in the Union’ (2021)

‘Scotland in the Union‘ (Dec., 2021) Paperback Kindle For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal for a Paperback No Further Payment for Postage Required. [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – this means Paypal take a cut & I’ve to make up the remainder.] Please Ensure You … Continue reading ‘Scotland in the Union’ (2021)

Glasgow’s Square Mile Murders (2021)

‘Glasgow's Square Mile Murders‘ [Illustrated] (Dec., 2021) Paperback Kindle For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal for a Paperback No Further Payment for Postage Required. [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – this means Paypal take a cut & I’ve to make up the remainder.] Please Ensure … Continue reading Glasgow’s Square Mile Murders (2021)

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XII. – Death-Bed and Funeral Ceremonies, &c.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    IN ancient times it was the custom to ring bells when any one was on the point of death. This was called the soul bell or passing bell, which was rung (says Grose) for two purposes - one, to bespeak the prayers of all good Christians for a soul just … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XII. – Death-Bed and Funeral Ceremonies, &c.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XI. – Omens, or Freits (concluded.)

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    10. Dr Jamieson says “that it is considered as an almost infallible presage of bad weather if the moon lies sair on her back, or when her horns are pointed to the zenith. It is a similar prognostic when the new moon appears wi’ the auld ane in her arms; … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – XI. – Omens, or Freits (concluded.)

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – X. – Fairies.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    THERE is perhaps none of the creations of superstition more attractive than that of fairies. Their diminutive size and handsome form, their habits of green and prancing palfreys, their midnight revels and their many elvish pranks, their king and queen with their glittering “compagnie” of courtiers have each and all … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – X. – Fairies.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. IX. – Omens, or Freits (continued.)

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    Funerals (continued). - If a person imagines that he sees a funeral it is a sign of the death of a near relative. If it is repeated thrice, it is a certain death-omen.     An instance of this is recorded by Peter Galbraith in his diary, when I will here … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. IX. – Omens, or Freits (continued.)

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – VIII. Omens, or Freits (continued.)

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    8. Crows, Rooks, and Ravens are pre-eminently birds of evil omen. If a crow cry it portends some evil. (Bourne.) By ravens both public and private calamities and death have been portended. (Ross.) If he hear but a raven croak from the next roof he makes his will. (Hall.) If … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – VIII. Omens, or Freits (continued.)

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – VII. – Omens, or Freits.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    OMENS, or signs of impending good or evil, but more frequently of the latter, were, in the days of superstition, so numerous that it is almost impossible to give a complete list of them. They were derived from every conceivable source - from things animate and inanimate, from things in … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – VII. – Omens, or Freits.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders, – No. VI. – Brownies:- Wag-at-the-Wa’; Red-cap; Kilmoulis.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    Wag-at-the-Wa’ was a species of Scotch brownie, who, it is understood, presided over the affairs of the kitchen, and was in some respects the family monitor as well as the servants’ constant tormentor. His usual seat was by the kitchen fire, or on the crook, which it was his great … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders, – No. VI. – Brownies:- Wag-at-the-Wa’; Red-cap; Kilmoulis.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. V. – Brownies.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    IN the superstitious mythology of many of the nations of Europe we find supernatural beings having at least some of the features which peculiarly belong to the Scottish brownie. Whether we owe the creation of this personage to our Celtic or our Saxon ancestry it is now in vain to … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. V. – Brownies.

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No.IV. – Witchcraft (continued).

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    HAVING devoted a few lines to the various trees which were entwined in one way or another in the superstitious beliefs of the country with the incantations of witchcraft, these Notes would be incomplete were no reference made to those animals - especially the cat and hare - whose forms … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No.IV. – Witchcraft (continued).

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. III. – Witchcraft (continued).

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents]    IT is a remarkable fact in connection with the history of witchcraft that the more it was persecuted the more it multiplied and grew - showing that popular beliefs, whether religious or superstitious, whether true or false, instead of being eradicated, are fostered and strengthened by oppression. No sooner was … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. III. – Witchcraft (continued).

Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. II. – Witchcraft.

[Kelso Chronicle Articles Contents] RANDOM NOTES  ANENT THE  ANTIQUITIES, TRADITIONS, SUPERSTITIONS,  AND OLD MANNERS AND CUSTOMS  OF THE BORDERS.  SECOND SERIES.  NO. II. - WITCHCRAFT.     THE story of witchcraft has been often told. It is a story replete with delusions and cruelties which to an enlightened mind are almost incredible. That certain old women … Continue reading Random Notes Anent the Antiquities, Traditions, Superstitions, and Old Manners and Customs of the Borders. – No. II. – Witchcraft.

Scotland in Union; Thoughts of Home Rule

[Scotland in Union Contents] In 1801 Ireland joined in its own union with Great Britain. This gave Scots something with which to compare their own union with England.  Barely forty years had passed before Irish calls for Home Rule and to repeal their own union came thick and fast. In 1838 we have a “remarkable … Continue reading Scotland in Union; Thoughts of Home Rule

Scotland in Union; First Century of the Union

[Scotland in Union Contents] It took the new British parliament one year to begin nullifying the supposedly protected, by article XIX, Scottish institutions. The first to be abolished was Scotland’s Privy Council, abolished by an act, “for rendering the union of the two kingdoms more complete,” in 1708, by creating one Privy Council for Great … Continue reading Scotland in Union; First Century of the Union

Scotland in the Union; How Scotland Came to be United with England

[Scotland in Union Contents] In 1290 after Edward I., after adding Wales to his dominions, decided he was also overlord of Scotland. This led to the Wars of Scottish Independence.     “We know that Edward I. set up such a monstrous claim, but that usurpation of authority got its fitting answer on the field of … Continue reading Scotland in the Union; How Scotland Came to be United with England

Burns and Fergusson, pp.121-122.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THAT Burns erected a monument over the grave of Fergusson, the poet, is well known - not so, hitherto, a little circumstance of interest connected with this honourable tribute to a brother-poet. It now appears that two years elapsed before Burns was able to pay for the monument - as witness … Continue reading Burns and Fergusson, pp.121-122.

He did not Know Burns, pp.120-121.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] HAVING lost my copy of Burns some time ago, I went into the book-shop of this town - Vryheid, Transvaal - to buy another. The proprietor (Von Schalweedenberg) was also the librarian of a circulating library.  “Could you oblige me with a copy of Burns?”  “I beg your pardon?”  “I wish … Continue reading He did not Know Burns, pp.120-121.

Pate McPhun at the Festival, pp.119-120.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BEING enamoured of Burns and everything that has a tendency to keep his memory green, as a natural consequence Saturday last found me in the Kay Park, Kilmarnock, waiting patiently for the proceedings to commence. The place was literally swarming with spectators, all dressed in their gayest attire, amongst whom I … Continue reading Pate McPhun at the Festival, pp.119-120.

A Snuff-box, pp.118-119.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] MR. BACON, who kept a celebrated posting-house north of Dumfries, was the almost inseparable associate of Robert Burns. Many a merry night did they spend together over their toddy. The bard and the inn-keeper became so attached to each other, that Burns gave his friend, as a token of regard, the … Continue reading A Snuff-box, pp.118-119.

“An’ then he Made the Lasses, O!,” p.118.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] A VERY apt and appropriate quotation of Burns’ well known lines was once made by the late Rev. Dr. Gillan of Inchinnan, who was gifted with a fund of dry and ready humour. The doctor had a numerous progeny; and on one occasion, when he had gone to a country parish … Continue reading “An’ then he Made the Lasses, O!,” p.118.

Who’s “Wah Hay?,” pp.117-118.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE following is culled from the “Singapore Free Press.”  “A certain enterprising gentleman that many of is know pretty well in Singapore, who has been asserted to have occupied himself lately in coating Hong Kong with vermilion, was present at a recent convivial entertainment there, at which assisted a strong force … Continue reading Who’s “Wah Hay?,” pp.117-118.

A Clergyman’s Story, pp.116-117.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] PROFESSOR WALKER was intimate with a clergyman who knew Burns, and had repeatedly met him in company, “Where,” said he, “the acuteness and originally displayed by him, the depth of his discernment, the force of his expressions, and the authoritative energy of his understanding, had created a sense of his power, … Continue reading A Clergyman’s Story, pp.116-117.

Wee Bobby Burns, p.115.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE Rev. G. Gilfillan many years ago visited the “auld clay biggin,” at that time a hostelrie for dispensing Burns’ beloved beverage, and other good things of this life. “We remember,” he says, “one rather odd circumstance: When looking at the concealed bed in which the poet was born, our companion … Continue reading Wee Bobby Burns, p.115.

Lines to a Mountain Daisy, pp.114-115.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE following anecdote regarding Hew Ainslie and Burns’ Poems is recorded by Ainslie’s biographer, Latto. He says - “A copy of Burns’ Poems was on the table open at the page containing “Lines to a Mountain Daisy.”  “Look there, noo,” remarked Hew, “Mountain Daisy! - Mountain Daisy! Hech, wow! but the … Continue reading Lines to a Mountain Daisy, pp.114-115.

Rev. John Russell – “Black Jock,” p.113.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] PROFESSOR WILSON says of him: “We remember walking one day - unknown to us a fast-day - in the neighbourhood of an ancient fortress (Stirling), and hearing a noise to be likened to nothing imaginable in this earth but the bellowing of a buffalo fallen into a trap upon a tiger, … Continue reading Rev. John Russell – “Black Jock,” p.113.

Miss Annie Stewart Cunningham, pp.112-113.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE above-mentioned lady - the heroine of “Anna, thy Charms,” “She’s Fair and Fause,” and “Had I a Cave” - was the daughter of John Stewart, Esq. of East Craigs. Burns’s friend Cunningham was for many years madly and hopelessly in love regarding her. Such was the strength of Cunningham’s craze … Continue reading Miss Annie Stewart Cunningham, pp.112-113.

Burns’s Blue-eyed Lassie, p.111.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] JEANIE was just 17; of sweet, winning manners, with waving, golden tresses and rosy cheeks; but above all a pair of laughing blue eyes. Burns was charmed with her artless manners, and particularly with her “twa sweet een;” his susceptible heart was fired with admiration for the daughter of his host.  … Continue reading Burns’s Blue-eyed Lassie, p.111.

“Lassie wi’ the Lint White Locks,” pp.110-111.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE young lady who was the subject of the “Lassie wi’ the Lint White Locks,” and to whom he says, in a letter to Mr. Thompson, we are indebted for some of his best songs, was a Miss J—— L——. She was then young and beautiful, and possessed of all the … Continue reading “Lassie wi’ the Lint White Locks,” pp.110-111.

Grave of Burns’s Father in Alloway Kirkyard, pp.109.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] NEAR the gate of the churchyard surrounding the ruin, and in which  “The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep,”  is the grave of Burns’s father. It is marked by a plain monumental stone, erected at the cost of the poet, and inscribed with a tender and touching epitaph, the effusion of … Continue reading Grave of Burns’s Father in Alloway Kirkyard, pp.109.

Hew Ainslie and “Bonnie Jean,” pp.106-107.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] LATTO in his Memoir of Hew Ainslie, gives the following account of Hew's visit to Burn's widow. When Hew landed at the cottage, Mrs. Burns "was overrun with visitors, but the stranger introducing himself, she received him in her kindly, motherly way. His manner was very winning when not oppressed by … Continue reading Hew Ainslie and “Bonnie Jean,” pp.106-107.

The Grave of Burns, p.103.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] IN the spring after Burns died, Thomas Nimmo, a native of Carnwath, having received his discharge from the army in England, was travelling home with a comrade. Passing through Dumfries, they inquired the way to St. Michael’s Churchyard to visit the poet’s grave. Following a footpath through the wilderness of ornaments, … Continue reading The Grave of Burns, p.103.

The Deil in his Pouch, p.102.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE following anecdote respecting Burns during his last days is given on the authority of Mr. Drummond of the “Perthshire Advertiser,” and is sufficiently interesting to be related:  “During his sojourn at Brow, the poet’s health was so much reduced that he lived almost entirely on port wine. Being off duty, … Continue reading The Deil in his Pouch, p.102.

Coat and Waistcoat, p.101.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE following paragraph about Burns is copied from an old London newspaper, “The Albion and Evening Advertiser,” dated May 23, 1801.  “Bon mot OF THE LATE ROBERT BURNS. - This singular character, it is well known, was addicted to the bottle. A physician who attended him in his last illness, remonstrating … Continue reading Coat and Waistcoat, p.101.

Burns and Punning, p.101.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BURNS disliked puns, and was seldom civil to those who uttered them.  “After all, a pun is an innocent thing,” said one of his companions.  “Innocent,” said Burns, “No, sir; it is committing ‘a deed without a name’ with the language.” 

“Watty and Meg,” pp.100-101.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BURNS admired Wilson’s “Watty and Meg” greatly. On one occasion, Andrew Bishop, a well known ballad-crier, was going along crying, “ ‘Watty and Meg,’ &c., by Burns.” The bard was writing at his desk, and exclaimed -  “O, Andrew, that’s a d——d lie; but I would have been very proud to … Continue reading “Watty and Meg,” pp.100-101.

“A Slice of his Constitution,” p.100.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] ROBERT BLOOMFIELD, in writing to the Earl of Buchan regarding Burns and himself, says - in reference to the fate of that extraordinary man [Burns]. “Remember Burns” has been the watchword of my friends. I do remember Burns; but I am not Burns; neither have I his fire to fan or … Continue reading “A Slice of his Constitution,” p.100.

Burns and the Paraphrases, pp.99-100.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] SIR JOHN RICHARDSON, the celebrated Arctic explorer, was born in Dumfries, and among the reminiscences of the future hero’s early years in that town we find one specially interesting anecdote.  Robert Burns was then residing in Dumfries, and every Sunday evening he spent some hours at the elder Richardson’s house, where, … Continue reading Burns and the Paraphrases, pp.99-100.

The Poet’s Pride, p.99.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] IN a characteristic letter addressed to Clarinda, bearing date 25th June, 1794, the bard refers to his old friend Ainslie as having become distant in his manner, and then refers to his own pride in the following words:-  “Though fame does not blow her trumpet at my approach now, as she … Continue reading The Poet’s Pride, p.99.

The Shady Side of the Street, pp.98-99.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] LOCKHART records an anecdote furnished to him by David MacCulloch, son of the Laird of Ardwall:-  “He was seldom more grieved than when riding into Dumfries one fine summer’s evening to attend a county ball, he saw Burns walking alone on the shady side of the principal street of the town, … Continue reading The Shady Side of the Street, pp.98-99.

A Nine Hours’ Sitting, pp.97-98.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] A WELL known Glasgow merchant, and an octogenarian, Mr. John Patterson, writing to Colin Rae-Brown in 1858, says:-  “During the holidays of 1795, my father was good enough to ask me to mount my pony and accompany him on a visit to his brother in Dumfries-shire. As we reached the George … Continue reading A Nine Hours’ Sitting, pp.97-98.

Burns at Ryedale; Death in the Cup, p.96.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] ONE day after dinner at Ryedale, Burns wrote the following lines on a goblet with his diamond. Lyme, whom Burns thus complimented, would seem to have been less affected with the compliment than with defacing his crystal service, for he threw the goblet behind the fire. We are not told what … Continue reading Burns at Ryedale; Death in the Cup, p.96.

A Contrite Heart; or Burns a Praying Man, p.95.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BURNS was deeply conscious of his own faults, and was ever ready to deplore them and condemn himself. A touching incident bearing on this is recorded in the edition of his works, edited by Hogg and Motherwell. It was related by a boon companion of Burns’s, and occurred after a night … Continue reading A Contrite Heart; or Burns a Praying Man, p.95.

The Poet Pentitent, pp.94-95.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] MRS. HAUGH, who knew the bard well to the last, said that Burns drank from circumstances rather than inclination. Her husband now and then, as he went out by day-light in the morning to his work, met Burns coming home. The poet never passed him without a word or two, expressing … Continue reading The Poet Pentitent, pp.94-95.

Burns’s Dislike of Soldiers, p.94.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] MRS. MONTAGUE, a friend of Allan Cunningham’s, related the following to him:-  “When I was at Arbigland, in 1793, I was introduced to Burns. His conversation pleased me much, and I saw him often. I was at a ball given by the Caledonian Hunt in Dumfries, and had stood up as … Continue reading Burns’s Dislike of Soldiers, p.94.

Kindly Consideration, p.93.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] ALLAN CUNNINGHAM tells us that one day the poet and a brother officer entered the shop of a widow woman in Dunscore, and made a seizure of smuggled tobacco.  “Jenny,” said the bard, “I expected that this would be the upshot.”  “Here, Lewars, take note of the number of rolls as … Continue reading Kindly Consideration, p.93.

“Kate are you Mad?”, pp.92-93.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE late Professor Gillespie, of St. Andrews, remembered seeing Burns on a fair day in August, 1790, at the village of Thornhill, where a poor woman, named Kate Watson, had taken up the publican’s trade for that occasion without a licence.  “I saw the poet,” he says, “enter her door, and … Continue reading “Kate are you Mad?”, pp.92-93.

The Muckle Black Kist, p.92.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] JEAN DUNN, a suspected trader in the parish of Kirkpatrick-Durham, observing Burns and one of his brother Excisemen, named Robertson, drawing near her house on the morning of a fair, slipped out by the back door, as if to evade their scrutiny, leaving in the cabin her attendant for the day. and … Continue reading The Muckle Black Kist, p.92.

The Solemn League and Covenant, p.90.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] ON hearing a gentleman sneering at the Solemn League and Covenant, and calling it ridiculous and fanatical, the poet eyed him across the table, and exclaimed:-  “The Solemn League and Covenant  Cost Scotland blood - cost Scotland tears -  But it sealed Freedom’s sacred cause:  If thou’rt a slave, indulge thy … Continue reading The Solemn League and Covenant, p.90.

A Black Character, pp.89-90.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THAN Burns, perhaps, no man more severely inflicted the castigation of reproof. The following anecdote will illustrate this fact. The conversation one night at the King’s Arms Inn, Dumfries, turning on the death of a townsman, whose funeral was to take place on the following day:-  “By the by,” said one … Continue reading A Black Character, pp.89-90.

Burns and the Astrologer, pp.88-89.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] MRS. MARION HUNTER, who well remembered Burns, narrated the following anecdote to Waddell, who gives it in his edition of Burns’s Works:-  She remembered distinctly “that when he (Burns) came to Muirkirk on one of his professional visits as an Exciseman, ‘a great, strong, deaf-and-dumb man, that spaed fortunes and could … Continue reading Burns and the Astrologer, pp.88-89.

The Threading of the Needle, pp.87-88.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] MRS. MONTAGU, who dined with Burns at Arbigland, says of him that he was witty; drank as others drank; and was long in coming to the tea-table. It was then the fashion for young ladies to be busy about something; I was working a flower. The poet sat down beside me, … Continue reading The Threading of the Needle, pp.87-88.

Humanity of Burns, p.87.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BURNS did not confine his love for man to words, but many were the deeds of kindness he did. An eye-witness had said, “That returning home to his house in the Wee Vennel, Dumfries, one stormy wet night after dark, he discovered a poor, half-witted, street-strolling beggar woman, well known about the … Continue reading Humanity of Burns, p.87.

Burns and the Soldier, pp.86-87.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] WILLIAM JOLLY, H.M. Inspector of Schools, in his “Burns at Mossgiel,” tells the following anecdote illustrative of the kindly geniality of the poet:-  George Patrick, a brother of old Willie Patrick, once a herd at Mossgiel, had become a soldier, and after the birth of his first-born, a girl, met his … Continue reading Burns and the Soldier, pp.86-87.

Burns and the Dumfries Library, p.86.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] A PUBLIC LIBRARY was opened in Dumfries about 1792, and Burns, who aided in establishing it, was admitted a free member on 5th March, 1793. In September of the same year, he presented four books to the Library - “Humphrey Clinker,” “Julia de Roubigne,” “Knox’s History of the Reformation,” and “De … Continue reading Burns and the Dumfries Library, p.86.

Burns and the Education of his Children, p.85.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE following interesting letter to the Provost, Bailies and Town Council of Dumfries, shows the sound appreciation Burns had of a good education for his children:-  “Gentlemen, - The literary taste and liberal sprit of your schools, as to make it a very great object for a parent to have his … Continue reading Burns and the Education of his Children, p.85.

Burns Amongst his Family, p.84.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] BURNS delighted to be beside his family. Mr. Gray, one of the teachers in the Academy, Dumfries, says:- “He spent many a delightful hour in directing the studies of his eldest son, a boy of uncommon talents. I have frequently found him explaining to this youth, then not more than nine … Continue reading Burns Amongst his Family, p.84.

Burns’s House in Dumfries, p.84.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] THE bard’s house was situated in Mill Street, and was of a good order. His eldest son’s testimony given to Chambers was as follows:- “They always had a maid-servant, and sat in their parlour. That apartment, together with two bedrooms, was well furnished and carpeted; and when good company assembled, which … Continue reading Burns’s House in Dumfries, p.84.

Strength and Activity of Burns, pp.82-83.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] HIS personal strength was united to great activity; he could move a twenty stone sack of meal without much apparent effort, and load a cart with bags of corn in the time, one of his neighbours said, that other men were talking about it. A mason was hewing him a stone … Continue reading Strength and Activity of Burns, pp.82-83.

The Waiter and his Sweetheart, pp.81-82.

[Anecdotes of Burns Contents] REV. MR. PAUL tells us that one day having sat down to dinner at an inn while on his way from Ellisland to Mauchline, with a pleasant party, Burns was resolved to consecrate the evening to conviviality, The dinner was near a close, and the wit of the bard was beginning … Continue reading The Waiter and his Sweetheart, pp.81-82.