Book List

Hughie’s Anticipation of Hogmanay Night, pp.9-11.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Seu tu querlos sive geris jocos,  Seu rixom, et insanos amores,  Seu facilem, pia testa, somnum.” - CAR. III., 21.  HOO cam’ this bonnie greybeard here,  Sae trimly to the time o’ year,  When folk maun lay ‘t in, tho’ it’s dear?  But this, I’se wauger,  Cost but the buyin’ o’ … Continue reading Hughie’s Anticipation of Hogmanay Night, pp.9-11.

Hughie’s Indignation at the Conduct of the Absconding Elder, pp.6-8.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Mala soluta navis exit alite.” - CAR. V., 10.  HE’S aff the kintra at a spang!  He’s on the sea - they’ve tint him!  The warst o’ weather wi’ him gang!  Gude weather bide ahint him!  O for a rattlin’ bauld Scots blast  To follow an’ owretak’ him -  To screed … Continue reading Hughie’s Indignation at the Conduct of the Absconding Elder, pp.6-8.

Hughie’s Advice to Auld Tammy to tak’ the use o’ his Savings, pp.4-5.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Linquenda tellus et domus." - CAR. II., 14.  YE’RE agein’, Tammy, agein’ fast,  The season o’ your strength is past;  Ye’re white but whaur ye’re bauld;  The footmarks o’ the craw are seen  Aboot the corners o’ your een -  Ye’re auld, my frien’, ye’re auld!  There’s some that on life’s … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to Auld Tammy to tak’ the use o’ his Savings, pp.4-5.

Hughie’s Advice to his Brother John, pp.1-3.

[Horace in Homespun Contents] “Omnes eodem cogimur." - CAR. II., 3.  DEAR JOCK, ye’re higher up the brae  Than me, your aulder brither -  Keep mind the higher up ye gae  The mair ye’re in the weather.  I’m no’ misdootin’ that ye’re wice,  An’, for your ploo-share, speed it!  But I may better gi’e advice,  … Continue reading Hughie’s Advice to his Brother John, pp.1-3.

Obittes this Zeire (1639), pp.369-371.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] Obitts this zeire, of eminent personages, wer, first, in the mounthe of Januarij, 1639, Robert Douglas, Wiscount Belheauen, sometyme Master of the Horses to Henrey, Prince of Walles, quho departed this lyffe at his duelling housse, neire Glasgow, the 5 day of this mounthe; to quhosse memorey his heires hes … Continue reading Obittes this Zeire (1639), pp.369-371.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1639-1640), pp.320-371.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As Regni Regis Carolj 15, et Sal: 1639. The castell of Edinbrughe wes takin by the Lordes couenanters, betuix foure and fyue a clocke in the eiuening of the 21 day of Marche, 1639; Mr Archbald Haddan, vnckell to the Laird of Gleneggies, being constable of the same, wnder the … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1639-1640), pp.320-371.

Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve)

[Celebratory Days Contents] A front page depiction of a Scottish tradition. This December 30, 1882, edition reads,“THE FIRST FOOT: A SCOTTISH CUSTOM ON NEW-YEAR’S EVE.”As you can see from the clock in the picture, however, it’s done after midnight into the early hours of New Year’s day, rather than on the eve of New Year. … Continue reading Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve)

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday July 18, 1840, pp.206-207.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS.  WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND.     THE mania respecting witchcraft - for such it might be called - which sprang up into vigour throughout southern Europe in consequence of the edicts of Innocent and Leo, spread in time to Scotland, and acquired strong possession of the public mind during the … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday July 18, 1840, pp.206-207.

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday March 7, 1840, pp.55-56.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS.  MODERN FICTIONS OF NORTHERN EUROPE.     THE introduction of Christianity among the Goths of northern Europe had naturally the same influence in abolishing the dark and gloomy fictions of their primitive mythology, as it has been shown to have exercised in the case of the Anglo-Saxons, an offshoot … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday March 7, 1840, pp.55-56.

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, February 15, 1840, pp.30-31.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS. THE DRUIDS.    INTERESTING as are the ancient superstitions and theological fables of Scandinavia, a notice of which formed the subject of the last paper in this series, British readers cannot but feel a still greater interest in the history of Druidism, the superstition which flourished peculiarly among … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, February 15, 1840, pp.30-31.

Day Fatality, June 25, 1836, pp.169-170.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] DAY FATALITY.     WE shall read history very imperfectly, if we be not aware of the numerous superstitions which, almost down to our own time, influenced the conduct of even the most enlightened nations. Accustomed as we are to ascertain every thing by experiment and fact, and to look to really … Continue reading Day Fatality, June 25, 1836, pp.169-170.

RSH Videos

Although, uncomfy with the idea of doing videos, it was something I was told was necessary to help highlight the site, as well as introduce folk to who was creating the content. I prefer to hide behind my old books, but here goes... - - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdrcj-6WPRE - - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VwfTuKkS6s - - https://youtu.be/aHbYwJX7IkY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rfndCDv0xM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3MY6c9IMn8 https://youtu.be/NYp95DF-ecgContinue reading RSH Videos

Giants, Dwarfs, and Pigmies, Saturday, June 8, 1833, pp.149-150.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] GIANTS, DWARFS, AND PIGMIES.    NOTWITHSTANDING the difference of opinion and controversy concerning giants and pigmies, it is sufficiently proved by travellers, whose veracity cannot be doubted, that there is not any country on the earth inhabited either by men who may strictly be called giants, or by pigmies. It is … Continue reading Giants, Dwarfs, and Pigmies, Saturday, June 8, 1833, pp.149-150.

No. V. (Cont.) – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st August, 1816, pp.577-583.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [“Seek out your ancient mother.”]    Respectfully inscribed to Gen. ALEXANDER DIROM, of Mount Annan.    SUCH were the outlines of this Cambrian kingdom, during the period of its recent existence: but these boundaries were shortly after contracted by the irruption of the eastern Angles, who, after a series … Continue reading No. V. (Cont.) – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st August, 1816, pp.577-583.

Christmas Eve, Christmas & Boxing Day

[Celebratory Days Contents] CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS AND OBSERVANCES IN SCOTLAND.  “Nor failed old Scotland to produce,  At such high tide, her savoury goose.”     OLD Father Christmas, with his jolly face, his rubicund form, his frosty hair, his presents for the children, his cheer and good news for young and old, rich and poor, is once … Continue reading Christmas Eve, Christmas & Boxing Day

Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday , December 25, 1841, pp.387-388.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITION.  OCCULT SCIENCE OF THE ANCIENTS.     THE present article, we conceive, may fitly be introduced towards the close of the lengthened series of papers which have now been given up on the subject of Superstitions. Its purpose is to review a number of the most remarkable phenomena recorded … Continue reading Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday , December 25, 1841, pp.387-388.

Art. I. – WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND., Volume 18, Oct., 1891, pp.257-288.

[Scottish Review Contents] IT is with no feeling of pleasure that a writer of the present day can enter upon the task of sketching the sad history of Scottish witchcraft. Horrible as are the events attending the development of the witch mania on the Continent, an enquiry into them yet brings us into the presence … Continue reading Art. I. – WITCHCRAFT IN SCOTLAND., Volume 18, Oct., 1891, pp.257-288.

No. V – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st July, 1816, pp.519-522.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."]    Respectfully inscribed to Gen. ALEXANDER DIROM, of Mount Annan.     BY the concurring testimony of ancient writers, it is quite apparent that the Mæatæ, or Midland Britons, possessed for ages a principality, or kingdom of their own, called Regnum Cambrense, or the kingdom … Continue reading No. V – On the Celtic Kingdom of Strath-Cluyd, called the Regnum Cambrense, in SCOTLAND, 1st July, 1816, pp.519-522.

No. IV. – On the Antiquity of Sepulchral Monuments and Inscriptions, 1st June, 1816, pp.436-443.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."] (From the Introduction to the "SEPULCHRALIA SCOTIÆ.”)    Respectfully inscribed to the Noblemen and Gentlemen constituting the Royal Society of Scottish Antiquaries.  INTRODUCTION.    AT a period when almost every species of literature is so assiduously cultivated and appreciated - when the diversified and … Continue reading No. IV. – On the Antiquity of Sepulchral Monuments and Inscriptions, 1st June, 1816, pp.436-443.

No. III. – On the Popular Superstitions of Ghosts and Witches, incident to the Border, 1st May, 1816, pp.344-352.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [“Seek out your ancient mother.”]    Respectfully inscribed to Sir G. McKENZIE, President of the Royal Society of Scottish Antiquities.     THE belief in ghosts, boagles, brownies, witches, fairies, &c., formed the more prominent features of the superstitious creeds of our feudal forefathers: not an old ruin upon the … Continue reading No. III. – On the Popular Superstitions of Ghosts and Witches, incident to the Border, 1st May, 1816, pp.344-352.

No. II. – On the Fairy Superstitions of the West of Scotland, 1st April, 1816, p.265-271.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents] “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” [Seek out your ancient mother.]    To the Right Hon. the Earl of BUCHAN, the illustrious founder of our National Societies.     MY LORD,     THE study of popular superstitions, though intimately connected with the history of the human mind, has in a great measure been neglected in this, … Continue reading No. II. – On the Fairy Superstitions of the West of Scotland, 1st April, 1816, p.265-271.

No. I. – On the Sepulchral Monuments, CELTIC, DRUIDIC, ROMISH and SCANDIAC, connected with this Country, 1st March, 1816, pp.194-198.

[Scottish Antiquities Contents]    Respectfully inscribed to the venerable and illustrative founder of our National Society, The Right Honourable the Earl of BUCHAN.  “Antiquam exquirite matrem.” ["Seek out your ancient mother."]    THERE is (says one of the greatest moralists of ancient times) a sort of melancholy pleasure in retracing the situation of cities once … Continue reading No. I. – On the Sepulchral Monuments, CELTIC, DRUIDIC, ROMISH and SCANDIAC, connected with this Country, 1st March, 1816, pp.194-198.

Part III. – Wraiths, 1st December, 1818, pp.13-17.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    NO part of our national mythology appears to have made so indelible an impression on the minds of the peasantry of Clydesdale, as that which relates to Wraiths, or spectral appearances of persons yet alive. It has neither been effaced by the extending prevalence of education. or by the … Continue reading Part III. – Wraiths, 1st December, 1818, pp.13-17.

Part II. – Fairies, 1st October, 1818, pp.30-35.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    MR EDITOR,     THE following fragment was written down, within these three weeks, from the recitation of a very worthy man, with whom it had been a great favourite in his youth. It certainly possesses little pretension to poetical merit; yet it details some particulars, peculiar itself, concerning the … Continue reading Part II. – Fairies, 1st October, 1818, pp.30-35.

Introduction and Part I. – Fairies, 1st August, 1818, pp.49-54.

[Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale Contents]    [The following communication, which is from the pen of a very respectable and worthy correspondent, will, we apprehend, be interesting to such of our readers as are gratified by the preservation of the fast-fading remains of the popular superstitions and peculiar dialect of our old Scottish peasantry. The author … Continue reading Introduction and Part I. – Fairies, 1st August, 1818, pp.49-54.

Obittes this Zeire (1638), pp.319-320.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In the mounthe of Marche this zeire, 1638, deyed William, Lord Alexander, eldest sone to William, first Earle of Streuelinge, Principall Secretarey of Scotland, at London. His corpes being enbalmed, wer brought home, and priually, in the night, enterred in Boweis Ile, in Streueling churche. He maried Ladey --- Douglas, … Continue reading Obittes this Zeire (1638), pp.319-320.

Nationall Assembley and Synod of Glasgow, pp.300-316.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In respecte the tyme of this nationall assembley and synod of Glasgow, wich sate from the 21 of Nouember, wntill the 21 of December this zeire, 1638, so maney bussines wer handled of heighe concernment, I will heir, for the readers memorey, onlie sett doune a diarey of the most … Continue reading Nationall Assembley and Synod of Glasgow, pp.300-316.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1638-1639), pp.249-320.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As Regni Regis Carolj 14, et Salutis 1638. About the 27 of Marche, this zeire, Traquaire makes for courte, hauing wndertakin to negotiate effectually for the peace of the countrey, and with 8 demandes from thesse that had subscriued and adhered to the couenant, wich he was to deall for … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1638-1639), pp.249-320.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1637-1638), pp.226-249.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As 13, Regni Regis Carolj, et Sal: 1637. The 13 of Julij, this zeire, 1637, the Lordes of his Maiesties priuey counsaile, by ther acte directed letters of horninge aganist the ministers, for baying and prowiding for eache paroche tuo bookes of comon prayer, with 15 dayes after they be … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1637-1638), pp.226-249.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, March 13, 1841, pp.63-64.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] SKETCHES OF SUPERSTITIONS. POPULAR FANCIES OF THE IRISH. - FIRST ARTICLE.    IRELAND has long teemed with superstitions of the wildest and most imaginative cast. Indeed, up to the present day, civilisation has been more ineffective in rooting them out from that country than from any other that can pretend to … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Sketches of Superstitions, Saturday, March 13, 1841, pp.63-64.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1634-1637), pp.216-226.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] As 10 Regni Regis Carolj, et Sal: 1634. In the mounth of Junij, 1634, Johne Elphinstone, Lord Balmerinoche, then a prissoner in Edinbrughe castle, quher he had beine imprissoned by his Maiesties command, (by the ouer-reuling pouer of the bischopes, and ther wicked and corrupte courte adherents) indicted befor the … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1634-1637), pp.216-226.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Extraordinary History of Mr Thomas Jenkins, Saturday, December 15, 1832, pp.361-362.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] EXTRAORDINARY HISTORY OF MR THOMAS JENKINS.    THE facts we are about to relate respecting this person are of so extraordinary a nature, that, if they had happened at a place distant from our scene of publication, or at a time remote from the present, we would have despaired of procuring … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Extraordinary History of Mr Thomas Jenkins, Saturday, December 15, 1832, pp.361-362.

The Order of K. Charles the I. Triumphall Entrey into the Citey of Edinbrughe.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] Entring at Castle Porte, and marching throughe the  Citey to his Palace of Holyrudhousse.  For maney ages this kingdome had not seine a more glorious and staitly entrey, the streetts being all railled and sanded; the cheiffe places quher he passed wer sett outt with staitly triumphall arches, obeliskes, pictures, … Continue reading The Order of K. Charles the I. Triumphall Entrey into the Citey of Edinbrughe.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1631-1634), pp.189-216.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1631. Vpone the first of Januarij, 1631, ther was a mightie feast made to the ambassador in the Kinges palace, at wiche ther wer non bot grandees and men of the golden key, quho are gentlemen of the Kings bed chamber. The ambassador sate at the tabells end, and all … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1631-1634), pp.189-216.

The Hermit of Manor, Saturday, April 27, 1833, pp.99-100.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] THE HERMIT OF MANOR. SO lately as December 1811, there died, in the vale of Manor, in Peebleshire, an aged individual, who had exhibited, during his life, nearly all the features and habits of the extinct species called a hermit. The name of this person was David Ritchie. He was deformed, … Continue reading The Hermit of Manor, Saturday, April 27, 1833, pp.99-100.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1630-1631), pp.177-189.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1630. Vpone new zeires day, 1630 arriued at London, Don Carolo de Coloma, ambassador from Spaine, to conclude the trettey, and had audience vpone Vedinsday the 12 of Januarij.  Aboute the end of Februarij, this zeire, a fleett of 14 saile, furnished with men, women and children, and all necessarieyes, … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1630-1631), pp.177-189.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1627-1630), pp.153-177.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 1627. The 12 of Januarij this zeire, 1627, Alexander, Earle of Linlithgow, during the minority and lesse age of James, Duck of Lennox, is commissionat to be Admirall of Scotland. This commissione wes accompanied with a letter from his Maiesty, of the 15 of this same mounthe, to his priuey … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1627-1630), pp.153-177.

Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Epitaphs, Saturday, September 17, 1836, pp.266-267.

[Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal Contents] EPITAPHS. To distinguish the last resting-place of a great man, or of a friend, by a monument and an epitaph, is the result of a natural, and, upon the whole, amiable disposition in man. It is a practice of great antiquity in almost all nations, and one which may be expected … Continue reading Chambers’ Edinburgh Journal; Epitaphs, Saturday, September 17, 1836, pp.266-267.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1626-1627), pp.134-153.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] In Appryle this zeire, 1626, the parliament presents the King with a remonstrance aganist the Duck of Buckinghame, and charges him in the housse of peeirs one, 13 artickells.  First quberof was tuochning his plurality of offices wich he had inhansed, to the dishonor of the King and detriment of … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1626-1627), pp.134-153.

The Order of the Royall Feaste, pp.124-126.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] The supper was keipt in the archbishopes grate; hall and the table rached from the one end therof to the other.  The King sate in the midest of the table, serued by my Lord the Grate Prior, quho represented the grate masters persone; befor him ther marched a number of … Continue reading The Order of the Royall Feaste, pp.124-126.

King Charles, the First of that Name (1625-1626), pp.115-134.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] 27 Marche, As 1 Caroli, et Sal: 1625.  KING Charles begane his rainge one Sonday the 27 of Marche, 1625, with the comon applausse and hartie love of all his subjectes; and one the last of Marche, being Thursday, at 2 a clocke in the afternoone, was solemly proclamied King, … Continue reading King Charles, the First of that Name (1625-1626), pp.115-134.

September 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] SAD RAILWAY ACCIDENT.  —————  WISHAW MAN FATALLY INJURED.  —————     Yesterday morning, William McCarridale, about 60 years of age, a hutch repairer, who resided in Caledonian Road, was fatally injured on the main line of the Caledonian Railway. He was proceeding to his work at Shields Colliery shortly before six … Continue reading September 1905

James the Sixth, his Character, pp.108-115.

[Historical Works Contents – Companion] THIS King’s character is much easier to take than his picture, for he could ever be hardly made to sit for the taking of that, which is the reason of so few good pieces of him; but his character was obvious to every eye.  He was of a middle stature, … Continue reading James the Sixth, his Character, pp.108-115.

K. Ja: the Sixth, his Charecter, pp.108-115.

[Historical Works Contents – Original] THIS Kinges charecter is much easier to take then his picture, for he could euer be hardlie made to sitt for the taking of that, wich is the reasone of so few good peeces of him; bot his charecter was obvious to eurey eye.  He was of a midle stature, … Continue reading K. Ja: the Sixth, his Charecter, pp.108-115.

King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625) – Updated, pp.1-107.

[Historical Works Contents - Companion] 1604.  THE parliament that was indicted on the 23rd of January, this year, to begin [on] the 10th of April thereafter, in the year 1604, was prorogued until the 24th day of the same month first, and the until the 18th of June; and at last ordained, by proclamation, to … Continue reading King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625) – Updated, pp.1-107.

King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625), pp.1-107.

[Historical Works Contents - Original] 1604.  THE parliament that wer indicted one the 23 of Januarij, this zeire, to begin the 10 of Appryle therafter, in Ao 1604, was prorougeud till the 24 day of the said monuthe first, and then wntill the 18 of Junij; and at last ordanid, by proclamatione, to be holdin … Continue reading King James the Sixth (continued) (1604-1625), pp.1-107.

August 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] ENGINE DASHES INTO CART.  —————  ALARMING AFFAIR AT CARNOUSTIE.  —————  MARVELLOUS ESCAPE AT LEVEL CROSSING.  —————     An accident of an alarming nature occurred at the level crossing at the foot of Golf Street, Carnoustie, yesterday afternoon.     It appears that Robert Fyffe, a carter in the employment of James … Continue reading August 1905

Scottish Wedding Customs

[Celebratory Days Contents] FROM THE SCOTTISH PRESS.  - MATRIMONIAL CASES.     OUR Scottish jurisprudence, from its simplicity, comprehension, and efficiency in regulating the rights between man and man, has often induced reform in the law of England. English lawyers may not be ready to acknowledge the obligation; but it is not the less true that … Continue reading Scottish Wedding Customs

Chapter XIX, pp.421-447.

[History of the Highlands Contents] MONTROSE appeared among his Athole friends at a time the most unfavourable for obtaining their aid. Many of them were engaged in the occupation of the harvest, securing, for the support of themselves and their families, the scanty and precarious crops which were then upon the ground, and which, if … Continue reading Chapter XIX, pp.421-447.

July 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF CARRIAGE DOORS.     Mr Alexander Hildersley, sanitary engineer, Belfast, has patented a contrivance by which the driver of a locomotive controls the opening of the carriage doors. The inventor claims that if the train is at a standstill in the station, with any or all doors closed, … Continue reading July 1905

Chapter XVIII, pp.394-420.

[History of the Highlands Contents] The successive victories of Montrose, in Scotland, were more than counterbalanced by those of the parliamentary forces in England. Under different circumstances, the success at Alford might have been attended with consequences the most important to the royal cause; but the defeat of the king, on the fourteenth of June, … Continue reading Chapter XVIII, pp.394-420.

June 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] FATALITY ON THE HIGHLAND RAILWAY.     Early yesterday morning the body of a man was found on the Highland Railway at Balavil, about three miles north of Kingussie. Information was at once conveyed to the police authorities at Kingussie, and Sergeant Fraser, in the forenoon, had the remains conveyed to … Continue reading June 1905

Chapter XVII., pp.365-393.

[History of the Highlands Contents] When the disastrous news of the battle of Inverlochy reached Edinburgh, the estates were thrown into a state of great alarm. They had, no doubt, begun to fear, before that event, and, of course, to respect the prowess of Montrose, but they never could have been made to believe that, … Continue reading Chapter XVII., pp.365-393.

May 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR ANNAN. - Last night the passenger train due at Annan at 4.30 P.M. from Kirtlebridge, on the Caledonian Railway, ran off the metals at the points at Corsehill, two miles from Annan. The engine and the whole of the carriages left the rails. Fortunately the train … Continue reading May 1905

Chapter XVI., pp.342-364.

[History of the Highlands Contents] MONTROSE now entertained confident expectations that many of the Royalists of the surrounding country, who had hitherto kept aloof, would join him; but after remaining three days at Perth, to give them an opportunity of rallying about his standard, he had the mortification to find, that, with the exception of … Continue reading Chapter XVI., pp.342-364.

April 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    ACCIDENT AT RAILWAY STATION. - On Saturday night James Macdonald, stonebreaker, Muir of Ord, on attempting to board the 7.25 north-going train while in motion, missed his footing and fell between the platform and the train, receiving an injury to his left leg. He was conveyed to the Northern … Continue reading April 1905

Chapter XV., pp.314-341.

[History of the Highlands Contents] HITHERTO the history of the Highlands has been confined chiefly to the feuds and conflicts of the clans, the details of which, though interesting to their descendants, cannot be supposed to afford the same gratification to readers at large, who require more inciting events to engage their attention than the … Continue reading Chapter XV., pp.314-341.

March 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents]    Mr Robert Sinclair Scott, of Greenock and Largs, a member of the shipbuilding firm of Scott & Co., Greenock, fell dead last evening in Glasgow Central Station.     He was crossing from the Station Hotel to board a train for London when he swooned and expired on the platform.  … Continue reading March 1905

Chapter XIV., pp.287-313.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE troubles in Sutherland and Caithness had been scarcely allayed, when a formidable insurrection broke out on the part of the Clan-Chattan against the earl of Moray, which occasioned considerable uproar and confusion in the Highlands. The Clan-Chattan had for a very long period been the faithful friends and followers … Continue reading Chapter XIV., pp.287-313.

January 1905

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1905) Contents] BLACK HOGMANAY.  —————  A SAD CHAPTER OF TRAGEDIES.  —————  OLD MAN KILLED AT FORFAR STATION.  —————  MIRACULOUS ESCAPES.  —————  MAN FALLS FROM EXPRESS TRAIN AT STANLEY.  —————     The close of the year has been marked by a number of tragic occurrences. At Glasgow nine persons dropped dead while celebrating … Continue reading January 1905

Chapter XIII., pp.257-286.

[History of the Highlands Contents] DURING the years sixteen hundred and twelve and thirteen, the peace of Lochaber was disturbed by the Clan-Cameron, who put the whole of that country into an uproar. George, Lord Gordon, eldest son of the Marquis of Huntly, raised a force to put them down, and wrote to Sir Robert … Continue reading Chapter XIII., pp.257-286.

Chapter XII., pp.233-256.

[History of the Highlands Contents] IN the early part of the year sixteen hundred and two, the west of Scotland was thrown into a state of combustion, in consequence of the renewal of some old quarrels between Colquhoun of Luss, the chief of that surname, and Alexander Macgregor chief of the Clan-Gregor. Aggressions had formerly … Continue reading Chapter XII., pp.233-256.

Chapter XI., pp.213-232.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE truce between the two earls having now expired, the earl of Sutherland, emboldened by the submission of Mackay, demanded redress from the earl of Caithness for the slaughter of George Gordon, [and] required that the principal actors in that affair should be punished. The earl of Caithness having refused … Continue reading Chapter XI., pp.213-232.

Chapter X., pp.199-212.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE Murrays and the other friends of the Sutherland family, no longer able to protect themselves from the vengeance of the earl of Caithness, dispersed themselves into different countries, there to wait for more favourable times when they might return to their native soil without danger. The Murrays went to … Continue reading Chapter X., pp.199-212.

‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1900-1903,’ (2020)

[Available Books Contents] ‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1900-1903‘ [Illustrated] (Oct., 2020) Paperback Kindle For Those Looking to Avoid Dealing with Amazon Click Here to Pay by Paypal & receive £5 discount. [Please DON’T tick for goods or services – Paypal will take a cut & leave me to make up the remainder.] Please Ensure You also … Continue reading ‘Scottish Railway Incidents: 1900-1903,’ (2020)

Chapter IX., pp.178-198.

[History of the Highlands Contents] IN the year fifteen hundred and sixteen, Adam Earl of Sutherland, in anticipation of threatened dangers in the north, entered into bonds of friendship and alliance with the earl of Caithness for mutual protection and support. The better to secure the goodwill and assistance of the earl of Caithness, Earl … Continue reading Chapter IX., pp.178-198.

Real Life Hallowe’en Stories from History

[Celebratory Days Contents] A wee pick of happenings from history that seem suited to being told at Hallowe'en. The well-known superstitious observances connected with Halloween have been referred to Eastern solar worship. The Reverend James Robertson, minister of Callander, described them in 1791, and alluded to the stone circles of Scotland as to Druidical temples. … Continue reading Real Life Hallowe’en Stories from History

December 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents]    SEVERE ACCIDENTS DURING SHUNTING OPERATIONS. - In two cases this week serious accidents took place during the dangerous operation of shunting waggons. On Monday, Wm. Melville, a shunter in the employment of the N.B.R. Company. residing at South Street, Innerleven, while engaged in shunting operations at Methil Dock, met … Continue reading December 1904

Chapter VIII., pp.163-177.

[History of the Highlands Contents] ON the return of James I. from his captivity in England, he found Scotland, and particularly the Highlands, in a state of the most fearful insubordination. Rapine, robbery, and an utter contempt of the laws prevailed to an alarming extent, which required all the energy of a wise and prudent … Continue reading Chapter VIII., pp.163-177.

Chapter VII., pp.144-162.

[History of the Highlands Contents] WE now resume the thread of our historical narrative. During the short reign of Edgar, which lasted nine years, viz. from one thousand and ninety-seven to eleven hundred and six, Scotland appears to have enjoyed repose; but that of his brother and successor, Alexander I., was disturbed in the year … Continue reading Chapter VII., pp.144-162.

Chapter VI., pp.127-143.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE removal of the court by Malcolm Ceanmore to the Lowlands was an event which was followed by results very disastrous to the future prosperity of the Highlands. The inhabitants soon sunk into a state of poverty, and, as by the transference of the seat of government the administration of … Continue reading Chapter VI., pp.127-143.

September 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents]    ACCIDENT. - Yesterday morning a somewhat serious accident happened to William Robertson, an engine-cleaner, who is employed of the Caledonian Railway engine shops. Robertson fell from his engine and sustained a broken leg, while his right ankle was twisted. He was removed to the Infirmary.  - Perthshire Advertiser, Friday … Continue reading September 1904

August 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents] PRISONER’S DARING DASH FOR LIBERTY.  —————  LEAPS FROM A TRAIN NEAR PERTH.  —————  IS SERIOUSLY INJURED.     A sensational attempt on the part of a man in custody of the police to regain his liberty took place near Perth on Saturday. Little can be learned regarding the circumstances connected with … Continue reading August 1904

Chapter IV. – Scottish Period, Anno 843 to 1097, pp.79-95.

[History of the Highlands Contents] THE accession of Kenneth, son of Alpin, to the Pictish throne, led to a union of the two crowns, or of two separate nations into one monarchy; but this union gave the Scots an ascendancy, which enabled them, afterwards, to give their name to the whole of North Britain. The … Continue reading Chapter IV. – Scottish Period, Anno 843 to 1097, pp.79-95.

July 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents]    ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday night an accident of a somewhat peculiar nature occurred here. As the Edinburgh mail, leaving the Central at 6.55, was passing through Bellshill Caledonian Railway Station, William Brown, 87 Overdale Road, Langside, superintendent of the sorting department, overbalanced and fell from the train on to … Continue reading July 1904

Chapter III. – Pictish Period, Anno 446 to 843, pp.60-78.

[History of the Highlands Contents] WE now enter upon what is called the Pictish period of Caledonian history, which embraces a course of three hundred and ninety-seven years, viz., from the date of the Roman abdication of the government of North Britain, in the year four hundred and forty-six, to the subversion of the Pictish … Continue reading Chapter III. – Pictish Period, Anno 446 to 843, pp.60-78.

June 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents] KILLED ON THE RAILWAY.  —————  Old Man’s Tragic Death.     A distressing railway fatality occurred at Aberdeen Railway Station this morning, about half-past eight o’clock. A labourer named James Linton was crossing the main line under Guild Street Bridge as a train from the north was entering the station, and … Continue reading June 1904

Chapter II. – Poetry of the Celts – Antiquity and Authenticity of the Poems of Ossian, pp.36-59.

[History of the Highlands Contents] NO question of literary controversy has been discussed with greater acrimony and pertinacity, than that regarding the authenticity of the poems of Ossian, and never did Saxon and Gael exhibit more bitter enmity in mortal strife than has been shown by the knights of the pen in their different rencontres … Continue reading Chapter II. – Poetry of the Celts – Antiquity and Authenticity of the Poems of Ossian, pp.36-59.

May 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents] SHOCKING ACCIDENT IN PERTHSHIRE.     While walking between Callander Station and Callander Junction this morning, John Stewart, foreman platelayer, was struck by the engine of the 7.30 train to Glasgow. He sustained a severe bruise on one of his sholders, and his right leg was broken in two places. After … Continue reading May 1904

Chapter I. – History of the Highlands; Roman Period, pp.1-35.

[History of the Highlands Contents] WHEN Agricola invaded North Britain in the year eighty-one of the Christian era, it appears to have been possessed by twenty-one tribes of aboriginal Britons, having little or no political connexion with one another, although evidently the same people in origin, speaking the same language, and following the same customs. … Continue reading Chapter I. – History of the Highlands; Roman Period, pp.1-35.

April 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents]    RAILWAY ACCIDENT. - While a goods train was on its way from Forfar to Dundee, and when at a point between Eassie and Alyth Junction on Saturday the axle of the guard’s van snapped, causing the vehicle to leave the rails. Fortunately the down line was left clear, as … Continue reading April 1904

Preface, pp.vii-viii.

[History of the Highlands Contents] IN offering to the public the following History of the Highlands and Highland Clans, which has so long occupied my attention, I think it right to state, without reserve, that the Work makes no pretensions whatever to original discovery, or novel speculation. Nothing is more easy than to hazard conjectures, … Continue reading Preface, pp.vii-viii.

March 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents] EXTRAORDINARY ACCIDENT NEAR INVERURIE.  —————  TRACTION-ENGINE AND LOCOMOTIVE IN COLLISION.  —————  TWO MEN SERIOUSLY INJURED.  —————     An alarming accident occurred last night on the railway between Inverurie and Oldmeldrum. It appears that a traction-engine, with threshing mill and waggon attached, was proceeding to the farm of Portsdown by the … Continue reading March 1904

February 1904

[Scottish Railway Incidents (1904) Contents] AN ANGRY RAILWAY PASSENGER.     At Linlithgow to-day, James Duffy, labourer, pleaded guilty to causing a disturbance at the Caledonian Railway Station, Fauldhouse. A number of previous convictions were recorded. The Fiscal stated that accused was very violent. He had entered the wrong train, and arrived at Fauldhouse by mistake. … Continue reading February 1904

Path-head, p.490.

[Gazetteer of Scotland Contents]    PATH-HEAD, a quoad sacra parish, and a considerable town, in the south-western extremity of the parish of Dysart, Fifeshire, half-a-mile east of Kirkcaldy, and three quarters of a mile west of Dysart. The town is seated on a plain, gently sloping to the precipitous rocks on the shore. It consists … Continue reading Path-head, p.490.

Gilmerton, pp.615-616.

[Gazetteer of Scotland Contents]    GILMERTON, a village partly in the parish of Fowlis-Wester, and partly in that of Monzie, in Perthshire. It stands on the mail-road between Glasgow and Perth, amidst a beautiful landscape, and is neat, well-built, and of modern erection. Extending from the village on the east, is a congeries or ridge … Continue reading Gilmerton, pp.615-616.

Newmills, p.442.

[Gazetteer of Scotland Contents]    NEWMILLS, a village in the parish of Torry-burn, Fifeshire, on the verge of the county, - the burn dividing it from Perthshire; half-a-mile west of Torryburn, and one and a half east of Culross. Here are the remains of a pier, once of considerable extent.