XIII. The Girl and the Dead Man, pp.220-222.

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From Ann Darroch, Islay.

THERE was before now a poor woman, and she had a leash of daughters. Said the eldest one of them to her mother,

“I had better go myself and seek for fortune.”

(‘S fheàrra dhomh fhéin dol a dh’ iarraidh an fhortain.)

“I had better,” said her mother, “bake a bannock for thee.”

(‘S fheàrra dhòmhs bonnach a dheasachadh dhuit.)

When the bannock was ready, her mother said to her,

“Whether wouldst thou like best, the bit  and my blessing, or the big bit and my curse?”

(Cò’ca ‘s fheàrr leat a’ bhlaidh bheag ‘s mo bheannachd na ‘bhlaidh mhor ‘s do mhollachd?)

“I would rather,” said she, “the big bit and thy curse.”

(‘S fheàrr leam a’ bhlaidh mhòr ‘s do mhollachd.)

She  went away, and when the night was wreathing round her, she sat at the foot of a wall to eat the bannock. There gathered the sreath chuileanach and her twelve puppies, and the little birds of the air about her, for a part of the bannock.

“Wilt thou give us a part of the bannock,” said they.

(An d’ thoir thu dhuinne pàirt de ‘n bhonnach?)

“I won’t give it, you ugly brutes; I have not much for myself.”

(Cha d’ thobhair a bheathaichean grànnda; cha mhòr a th’ agam dhomh féin.)

“My curse will be thine, and the curse of my twelve birds; and thy mother’s curse is the worst of all.”

(Biodh mo mhollachds’ agadsa, ‘s mollachd mo dha eun deug, ‘s e mollachd do mhàthar is measa dhuit air fad.)

She rose and she went away, and she had not half enough with the bit of the bannock. She saw a little house a long way from her; and if a long way from her, she was not long reaching it. She struck in the door.

“Who’s there?”

(Cò tha siod?)

“A good maid seeking a master.”

(Searbhantha math aig iarraidh maighstir.)

“We want that,” said they,

(Tha sin a dhìth oirnne.)

and she got in. She had now a peck of gold and a peck of silver to get; and she was to be awake every night to watch a dead man, brother of the housewife, who was under spells. She had besides, of nuts as she broke, of needles as she lost, of thimbles as she pierced, of thread as she used, of candles as she burned, a bed of green silk over her, a bed of green silk under her, sleeping by day and watching by night. The first night wen she was watching she fell asleep; the mistress came in, she struck the magic club on her, she fell down dead, and she threw her out at the back of the midden.

Said the middle one to her mother,

“I had better go seek fortune and follow my sister.”

(‘S fheàrra domh dol a dh’ iarraidh an fhortain, ‘s mo phuithar a leantainn.)

Her mother baked her a bannock; and she chose the big half and her mother’s curse, as her elder sister did, and it happened to her as it happened to her sister. 

Said the youngest one to her mother,

“I had better myself go to seek fortune too, and follow my sisters.”

(‘S fheàrra dhomh féin dol a dh’ iarraidh an fhortain cuideachd, ‘s mo pheathraichean a leantainn.)

“I had better bake a bannock,” said her mother. “Whether wouldst thou rather the little bit and my blessing, or the big bit and my curse?”

(‘S fheàrr dhòmhsa bonnach a dheasachadh. Cò’ca ‘s fheàrr leat a’ bhlaidh bheag ‘s mo bheannachd, na ‘bhlaidh mhòr ‘s mo mhollachd?)

“I would rather the little bit and your blessing.”

(‘S fheàrr leam a bhlaidh bheag ‘s bhur beannachd.)

She went, and the night was wreathing round her, and she sat at the foot of a wall to eat the bannock. There gathered the sreath chuileanach and the twelve puppies, and the little birds of the air about her.

“Wilt thou give us some of that?”

(An d’ thobhair thu dhuinne rud dheth sin?)

“I will give, you pretty creatures, if you will keep me company.”

(Bheithir a bheathaichean bòidheach, ma ni sibh comaith rium féin.)

She gave them some of the bannock; they ate and they had plenty, and she had enough. They clapped their wings about her till she was snug with the warmth. She went, she saw a little house a long way from her; and if it was a long way from her, she was not long reaching it. She struck the door.

“Who’s there?”

(Co siod?)

“A good maid seeking a master.”

(Searbhanta math aig iarraidh maighstir.)

“We have need of that.”

(Tha sin a dhìth òirnne.)

The wages she had were a peck of gold and a peck of silver; of nuts as she broke, of needles as she lost, of thimbles as she pierced, of thread as she used, of candles as she burned, a bed of the green silk over her, and a bed of the green silk under her. She sat to watch the dead man, and she was sewing; on the middle of night he rose up, and screwed up a grin.

“If thou dost not lie down properly I will give thee the one leathering with a stick.”

(Mar an laidh thu sìos mar a th’ agad bheir mise aon straoileadh dhuit de bhata.)

He lay down. At the end of a while, he rose on one elbow, and screwed up a grin; and the third time he rose and screwed up a grin. When he rose the third time, she struck him a lounder of the stick; the stick stuck to the dead man, and the hand stuck to the stick; and out they were. They went forward till they were going through a wood; when it was low for her it was high for him; and when it was high for him it was low for her. the nuts were knocking their eyes out, and the sloes taking their ears off, till they got through the wood. After going through the wood they returned home. She got a peck of gold and a peck of silver, and the vessel of cordial. She rubbed the vessel of cordial to her two sisters, and brought them alive. they returned hom; they left me sitting here, and if they were well, ’tis well; and if they were not, let them be.

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