‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it’ (1891)

This is a publication, one of many, that I’ve been dying to get my hands on. Our anonymous Patron has stepped in and made it happen! We’re very excited here at RSH to find out what he has in store for us. It came to my attention during the ‘Treaty of Union Articles’ (2019) research. I had already become a fan of its author, having published many of his quotes and letters to the site and social media. In footnote 3 of our book’s chapter, ‘Financial Cost to Scotland of the Union,’ it says;

“In the interesting book just published by Mr. Waddie, Hon. Secretary of the Scottish Home Rule Association, ‘How Scotland lost her Parliament and what came of it,’ he give figures to show that, in the period of thirty years, from 1861 to 1891, Scotland has lost from over taxation alone no less than £92,684,319.”

Which really made me want to read what else it contained. However, no amount of internet searching took me to a readable version of this publication. There were also none to purchase. This was strange, but I was resigned to the fact. Then our mysterious benefactor contacted me asking if I’d found a copy yet, I responded that I’d given up the hunt, and lo and behold, one arrives from the United States. I am, again, very excited to get into this one.

There’s an advert for a book of poetry at the end of the book that made me laugh, so I’ve included it in the scans below. It states, after giving a description of what was available to purchase, that;

   “When published the little work was received with a storm of ridicule and abuse, the author expected no less, had it been received with complacency he would have missed his aim.”

[Text]

 

Charles Waddie

Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Front Cover.

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Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Spine.

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Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Inside the Front Cover.

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Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Title Page.

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Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Publisher’s Page;
   ” ‘It may chance to light on some ingredients of national feeling and set folks beards ablaze; and so much the better if it does. I mean better for Scotland, not a whit better for me.’ – Sir Walter Scott’s Journal, 21st February 1826.”

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Charles Waddie (1891), ‘How Scotland Lost Her Parliament and what came of it,’ Edinburgh: Waddie & Co., Ltd, Advertisement at the very end of the publication;
Crown 8vo, 48 pp. – One Shilling
SCOTIA’S DARLING SEAT:
A Home Rule Sermon, and other Poems
(This short poem was inspired by the Third Satire of Juvenal)
˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜˜
ARGUMENT
   Gordon meeting a friend on the streets of Edinburgh, in evident perturbation of mind, asks him what is amiss. The friend then relates that he is about to leave the city, disgusted with the want of public spirit and national pride of the citizens. Gordon gently chides his friend for his passion, who then proceeds to justify his retirement from the city by giving examples of meanness of conduct in welcoming Statesmen who have done everything in their power to degrade the city. He inveighs against the arrogance and conceit of the ruling classes, and gives examples of eminent citizens who have been driven from the city, he laments the decadence of art and ascribes it to the pedantry of the schools. After he has relieved himself of his spleen Gordon takes up the theme and, while admitting much that his friend has said, reminds him of the many blessings they enjoy and combats his resolution to desert the city, and calls it cowardice. Having in their walk reached the Calton Hill, while the sun is setting a burst of admiration of the scene escapes from the poet, and an invocation to Scotland’s best sons to come and rescue the capital from its degradation.
———
   When published the little work was received with a storm of ridicule and abuse, the author expected no less, had it been received with complacency he would have missed his aim.
———————
WADDIE & CO., LIMITED, EDINBURGH
And all Booksellers

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