Perth, pp.243-246.

[Scottish National Memorials Contents]

   THE MORRIS OR MOORISH DANCER’S DRESS, with cap and 21 dozen brass bells, pair of white leather shoes, white leather gloves, and rapier. This dress is referred to in Sir Walter Scott’s novel, The Fair Maid of Perth. It is one of thirteen worn by members of the Incorporation of Glovers at a performance got up by them on the 10th of July 1633, for the entertainment of Charles I., on the occasion of his visit to Perth. The circumstances of the royal visit and the glover’s pageant are thus described in the Minutes of the Incorporation: ‘Memorandum of His Majestie’s Coronation and comming to Scotland. His entrie to Edinburgh and Perth, The 25th of June, 1633. Which day our most dread Soveraigne Charles, King of England, France, and Ireland, came to Edinburgh, who was honourablie with Great pomp and Solemnitie received by the Provost, baillies, and Eldermen, and ane Guard of the Citizens of the said City, and Attended upon from the West port where he entered. Being accompanied with the Nobilitie of Scotland ryding before, And the Nobilitie of England ryding behind him. To his most Glorious palace of Holyrood house. Who upon the Eightein day of the Said Moneth received his Ancient Crown of this, his Ancient Kingdome of Scotland, in the Abbay Kirk of Holyrood house, with all Solemnities and dignities requisit thereto. The like never So Glorious in time formerly. Thereafter He took his progress to visit his palaces in this his Kingdome unknowen to him formerly, Viz., To Witt, Lithgow, Sterling, Dumfermling and Falkland, from whence he desired out of his Gracious favour and love, with his Nobilitie of both Kingdomes, to visit his own City of the burgh of Perth upon the eight day of July. Whereat the entrie of our South Inch port, He was honourablie received be the Provost, baillies, and Eldermen, And be the deliverie of ane Speich mounting to his praise. With Thanksgiving for his Majestie’s Arrival To visit this our Citie, Who still remained one horse back, And heard the same patientlie, And conveyed therefrom be our young men on Guard with partizans cled in reid and white to his Lodging at the end of the Southgate, belonging now heritablie to George, Earl of Kinnowl, head Chancelour of Scotland. The morrow thereafter came to our Church, and in his Royal Seat heard Ane Reverend Sermon, And Immediatlie thereafter came to his Lodging, And went down to the Garden thereof His Majestie’s Chair being Sett upon the Wall, next to the Water of Tay, Whereupon was ane flett Stage of Timber, clead about with birks. Upon the which for His Majestie’s welcome and entry, Thirtein of our brethren of this, our Calling of Glovers, With Green Capes, Silver Strings, Reid Ribbonds, White Shooes, And bells about their leigs, Shewing rapers in their hands, And all other abulziment, Danced, over Sword dance with many dificult Knotts And Allapallajesse five being under and five above upon their shoulders, Thrie of them dancing through their feet, Drinking Wine and breaking of Glasses about them (Which God be praised) wee Acted and did without Hurt or Skaith to Any. Which drew us to Great Charges and Expencess Amounting to the sum of Thrie Hundreth and fifty merks (yet not to be remembered) Because we was Graciouslie Accepted be our Soveraigne and both Estates to our Honour and Great Commendation.’ (See Fig. 171.) 

(997) Lent by the GLOVER INCORPORATION OF PERTH, 

per DEACON JOHN MURDOCH. 

   GABERLUNZIE OR BEGGAR’S BADGE, Comrie, 1775. Gaberlunzies’ Badges date as far back as the early part of the fifteenth century. In the second Parliament of James I. (1424) it was enacted that begging was not allowed to persons between fourteene and three score ten zeires; ‘and,’ says the Act, ‘they that sal be thoiled to beg, sall have a certaine takin on them to Landwart of the Schireffe; and in the Burrowes they sall have takin of the Aldermen or of the Baillies.’ In the reign of James V. it was enacted ‘for refraining of the multitude of maisterful and strange beggars,’ ‘that na beggars be thoiled to beg in ane Parochin that ar borne in ane uther, and that the headesmen of ilk Parochin mak takinnes and give to the beggers thereof.’ In 1579 the fifth Parliament of James VI. renewed this legislation, and made a further approach to the modern parochial method of poor-relief by adding that the ‘Beggares of ilk Parochin bee susteined within the boundes thereof: and that nane uther be served with almes within that Parochin, but they that beares that takinne allanerlie.’ (See Additional Note on page 255.) 

(1436) Lent by ANDREW DAVIE. 

   GLOVERS’ FLAG. The avocations of this incorporation were not always of a peaceful nature. They still show a banner under which their forefathers fought in the troubles of the seventeenth century. It bears this inscription: ‘The perfect honor of a Craft or beauty of a trade is not in Wealth but in Moral Worth whereby Virtue gains Renown,’ and surmounted by the words ‘Grace and Peace,’ and date 1604. Notes to Scott’s Fair Maid of Perth

(998) Lent by the GLOVER INCORPORATION OF PERTH. 

   ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S TAWSE. – ‘The only other relic in the archives of this body which calls for notice in this place is a leathern lash called the whip of St. Bartholomew, which the craft are often admonished in the records to apply to the backs of refractory apprentices.’ – Notes to Scott’s Fair Maid of Perth. (See Fig. 172.) 

(999) Lent by the GLOVER INCORPORATION OF PERTH. 

   BLUE BLANKET, the ancient Banner of the Convener of the Incorporated Trades of Perth, borne at the Annual Wappenschaws, when craftsmen turned out in armour to show that they were ready for service. James VI. complained of their independent spirit, and wrote in the Basilicon Doron, ‘The craftsmen think we should be content with their work how bad soever it be, and if in anything they be controlled, up goes the Blue Blanket.’ It is said the Blanket was presented to the Court by Queen Mary. 

(1000) Lent by the TRADES INCORPORATION OF PERTH, 

per JOHN STEWART, Convener

   ‘SANCT ELOYIS BOX,’ in which was kept ‘Sanct Eloyis Gear,’ as the funds of the Hammermen of Perth were called. The Boxmaster of the Incorporation kept his money and valuables in this box, and carried it at Michaelmas to the meetings of the craft on the South Inch, to render account of his intromissions for the year, and show his balance safe in the box. ‘St. Eloy’ is the local name for St. Eligius, Bishop of Noyon, in the seventh century, and Patron Saint of Hammermen. St. Eligius was a popular character in mediæval times. Chaucer, in his Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, says of the gentle nun:- ‘Hire gretteste ooth ne was but by Saynt Loy.’ This box has been in possession of the Incorporation for more than 350 years. 

(1001) Lent by the TRADES INCORPORATION OF PERTH. 

   ‘SANCT ELOYIS OFFERAND STOK,’ used in St. John’s Church. Perth, at the Altar of the Hammermen Incorporation, for receiving the offerings of members and the benevolent. It is figured and described in the Pro. Soc. Ant. Scot., vol. viii., N. S., p. 51, and possesses much interest as a relic of the Church furniture of pre-Reformation times. The Stok is mentioned in the minutes of the Hammermen Incorporation as early as the year 1518. It is now the property of A. Davie, Esq., St. Fillan’s Hotel, in whose possession it had been for many years. (See Fig. 173.) 

(1002) Lent by the TRADES INCORPORATION OF PERTH. 

   ANCIENT HUNTING HORN, which belonged to the Earls of Perth, presented by Lady Rachel Drummond, 1784. 

(1003) Lent by the LITERARY AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY OF PERTH. 

   OAK ARM-CHAIR, with oblong panelled back, on which is a carved shield, initials ‘M.G.R.,’ and date 1588. The legs are turned, and the seat, which has been renewed, is of soft wood. It is said to have come from Gowrie House, but when presented by Mr. G. W. Gloag it was merely described as a chair made in 1588. 

(1004) Lent by the LITERARY AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY OF PERTH. 

   TWO HIGHLAND PISTOLS, silver-mounted, one having a heart shaped butt, ‘AM’ on lock plate, and barrel inlaid with silver plates. Second, ram’s horn butt, stock and barrel inlaid with plates and discs of silver. 

(1005) Lent by the LITERARY AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY OF PERTH. 

   COOKING VESSEL, OF BRASS. Inscribed on handle:- ‘PITY THE PORE 1684.’ This vessel is in the form of a saucepan, but from the inscription which runs along the handle, it has come to be regarded as a ladle for collecting church-offerings for the poor, a purpose for which its relatively great weight in proportion to its capacity, would ill suit it. Similar vessels are in the British Museum. 

(1008) Lent by the LITERARY AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY OF PERTH. 

   A PULPIT HOUR-GLASS, from Perth. 

(1006) Lent by W. MURRAY THREIPLAND. 

   AN IRON PADLOCK, from Gowrie House, Perth. This interesting historical building, the palace of the Earls of Gowrie, erected early in the sixteenth century. was removed in 1805 to make room for Perth Jail and County Buildings. 

(1007) Lent by W. MURRAY THREIPLAND. 

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