Gallery No. 1.

Portraits., pp.1-40.

 

Lent by the University of Glasgow.
1. FRANCES HUTCHESON, LL.D.
Born, 1694; died, 1747.
Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. The son of a Presbyterian clergyman in the North of Ireland, whose family had been one of some antiquity in the county of Ayr. Dr. Hutcheson studied in the University of Glasgow, and was educated for the ministry. Instead of entering the Church, however, he accepted the position of head of an educational establishment in Dublin, where his liberal political opinions, and his Presbyterian connection, subjected him to considerable hostility and persecution. The earliest, and, at the same time, the freshest and ablest of his writings, “An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue,” appeared in 1725. This was followed by the “Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions” in 1728. The high reputation which these writings gained him, taken in connection with his brilliant career as a student, led to his appointment to the chair of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow in 1729, as successor to the learned Gershom Carmichael. He discharged the duties of this position until his death in 1747, at the early age of fifty-three. Dr. Hutcheson was a man of very varied attainments; his writings and teachings embraced æsthetical, moral, and political subjects; and in all of these departments he has left the impress of a powerful and cultivated mind. He may, in truth, be fairly regarded as the originator of those branches of reflective inquiry in Scotland in connection with which the names of Adam Smith, Thomas Reid, and Dugald Stewart are conspicuous. As a lecturer on morals, he was high-toned, able, and eloquent. Besides the works already mentioned, there is the posthumous one, “A System of Moral Philosophy,” with his Life, by Principal Leechman, published in 1755. He has also left Logical and Ethical Compends. (See Nos. 982, 2093, 2139, 2351.)
PAINTER – John Foulis.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
2. DOROTHY HUNTER or BAILLIE.
Born, 1721; died, 1806.
Wife of Dr. James Baillie (No. 8). Sister of the celebrated William and John Hunter (Nos. 4 and 341).
PAINTER – Robert Edge Pine.
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Lent by Hugh F. Weir of Kirkhall.
3. —— CLARK.
Born, 17—; died,      .
Daughter of Thomas Clark, merchant in Glasgow, and younger sister of Mrs. McBride of Baidland (No. 6).
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
4. WILLIAM HUNTER, M.D., of Long Calderwood, Lanarkshire.
Born at Long Calderwood, 23rd May, 1718; died in London, 30th March, 1783.
Physician and Surgeon. One of the most eminent teachers of anatomy of the last century; author of several celebrated works. Studied in Glasgow University, from 1731 to 1736; settled in London in 1741 as assistant to Dr. James Douglas, whom he shortly afterwards succeeded; and became physician to Queen Charlotte. Was the instructor, in anatomy, of his brother, John Hunter. By his will, of date 23rd July, 1781, he left the ultimate possession of his extensive and valuable museum and library, with a considerable sum of money, to the University of Glasgow. The collection was conveyed to Glasgow in 1807, and now, with many additions, constitutes the Hunterian Museum. (see Nos. 520, 521, 525, 829, 1279, 1703, 1704, 1773, 1806.)
PAINTER – Robert Edge Pine.
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Lent by Sir David Carrick-Buchanan, K.C.B., of Drumpellier.
5. GEORGE BUCHANAN of Mount Vernon.
Born, 1728; died, 1762.
Virginia merchant. Second son of Provost Andrew Buchanan of Drumpellier (No. 46). Married Lilias, daughter of James Dunlop of Garnkirk (No. 54), and niece of Provost Colin Dunlop of Carmyle (No. 82). The more famous Mount Vernon, the home of the Washingtons, adjoined George Buchanan’s Virginia estates; it was originally “Hunting Creek,” and was changed to “Mount Vernon” by Laurence Washington in compliment to the brave old British Admiral Vernon, under whom Laurence had served in the unlucky Carthagena expedition. George Buchanan’s Mount Vernon was originally “Windy Edge,” and was changed to “Mount Vernon” by him in compliment to his Virginian friends and neighbours, the Washingtons of Mount Vernon. George Buchanan built as his town residence the famous “Virginia mansion.” This stood at the top of Virginia Street (which he formed through his own ground) – a spacious edifice, with wings and offices beyond them, with a range of hot-houses, and ornamental garden reaching south to the line of Wilson Street, where stood a handsome gateway. The Virginia mansion was sold by George Buchanan’s trustees to Alexander Speirs of Elderslie (No. 70). It became eventually the property of the Union Bank of Scotland, which pulled it down in 1842 to build its new premises fronting Ingram Street. The Virginia mansion fronted Virginia Street.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by Hugh F. Weir of Kirkhall.
6. ELIZABETH CLARK or McBRIDE.
Born, 17—; died,      .
Daughter of Thomas Clark, merchant in Glasgow, and wife of Hugh McBride of Baidland, grandson of James McBride, Town clerk of Glasgow, 1695. (See No. 3.)
PAINTER – Said to be Hugh McBride.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
7. The Rev. THOMAS REID, D.D.
Born in the Manse of Strachan, 1710; died, 1796.
Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. On his father’s side he was descended from a long line of clergymen. His mother belonged to the family of the Gregorys, so illustrious in the medical and scientific history of Scotland. In 1737 he was licensed to the ministry, and ordained to the charge of New Machar, where he continued till 1752. In the quiet of this country parish he read Hume’s “Treatise of Human Nature,” which had recently appeared, and this roused him, as it did another great thinker – Kant – to active reflection on the great questions of intellectual philosophy. In 1752 he was promoted to a professorship in King’s College, Aberdeen. The fruit of his thinking during these days was given to the world in 1763 in the form of an “Inquiry into the Human Mind” – the most original and profound of all his writings. His reputation at this period was so great that he was solicited by the University of Glasgow to take the chair of Moral Philosophy there, which had been vacated by Adam Smith. This position he occupied until his death, in 1796. Original in thought, clear and simple in style, grave and earnest in character, Reid was the founder of a school of philosophy which has greatly influenced opinion in his own country, in France, and in America. His principal works, besides the “Inquiry,” are – “Essays on the Intellectual Powers,” 1785; “Essays on the Active Powers,” 1788. (See Nos. 534, 538.)
PAINTER – Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
8. The Rev. JAMES BAILLIE, D.D.
Born about 1723; died, 1778.
Professor of Divinity in the University of Glasgow. He married Dorothy Hunter (No. 2), sister of the great anatomist William Hunter (No. 4), and of John Hunter (No. 341), and was father of the great physician, Matthew Baillie (No. 214), and of Joanna Baillie, the poetess (No. 495).
PAINTER – Robert Edge Pine.
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Lent by Henry McCall of Daldowie.
9. SAMUEL McCALL.
Born in Dumfriesshire, 1681; died in Glasgow, 1759.
Merchant. One of the “Virginia Dons.” Councillor in 1722 and Bailie in 1723. He was elected Dean of Guild in 1736, but refused to accept office, whereupon he was imprisoned for a short time in the Tolbooth. His house, with its garden, stable, and brewhouse, was situated on the south side of the Gallowgate, and bounded on the east by the Molendinar burn. He married, first, in 1707, Isobel, daughter of William Blackburn and Margaret Murdoch, and had by her a son, Samuel, who settled in Philadelphia; and second, in 1714, Margaret, daughter of John Adam, merchant in Glasgow, and Mary Wood, by whom he had John, of Belvidere, merchant in Glasgow, now represented in Glasgow by his great-grandson, Samuel McCall. Another son was James, of Braehead (No. 469).
PAINTER – A pupil of Sir Peter Lely.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
10. WILLIAM CULLEN, M.D.
Born at Hamilton, 1710; died at Edinburgh, 1790.
Professor of Medicine in Glasgow University from 1751 to 1756. Educated at the Grammar School, Hamilton, he served a short apprenticeship to a surgeon and apothecary in Glasgow. After a voyage as surgeon on board a merchant vessel, he settled at Hamilton in 1737. In 1740 he took the degree of M.D. at the University of Glasgow, and afterwards removed to that city in 1746. He delivered lectures on chemistry and medicine from that time, in connection with the University, till 1751, when he was chosen Regius Professor of Medicine in the University. In 1756 he became Professor of Chemistry in Edinburgh University, and, on the death of Dr. Gregory, he succeeded to the chair of the Practice of Medicine, which he held with distinguished honour to the close of his life. Dr. Cullen published many valuable works. He was the instructor of William Hunter and of Joseph Black. A monument was erected to his memory over his grave in Kirknewton churchyard by the College of Physicians, Edinburgh. He married Anna, daughter of the Rev. Robert Johnston, of Kilbarchan. (See No. 1775.)
PAINTER – William Cochran.
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Lent by Miss Dinwiddie, London.
11. ROBERT DINWIDDIE.
Born at Germiston, 3rd October, 1692; died at Clifton, 27th July, 1770.
Merchant in Glasgow. Son of Robert Dinwiddie of Germiston, merchant in Glasgow, by Elizabeth, daughter of Matthew Cumming, of Cardarroch, merchant in Glasgow. Appointed in 1727 Collector of Customs in Bermuda, and there and in other colonial appointments did good honest work for His Majesty. In 1751 appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia, and served there for six anxious years; the first troubles with the French came in his time; in connection with these Governor Dinwiddie gave Major George Washington his first appointment on active service. During his Governorship he presented to the Corporation of Norfolk, Va., a splendid silver mace, which still exists, and to the library of the old college of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va., many books bearing his bookplate, which were burned during the Confederate war. To the library of our own University (of which he had been an alumnus, and had been made an LL.D.) he left a legacy of £100 which, “as being most respectful to his memory,” is still preserved intact. In January, 1758, Governor Dinwiddie returned from Virginia broken in health. He died at “Clifton Hot Wells” on 27th July, 1770, and was buried in the old parish church of Clifton, from which his elaborate monument has been removed to the present church. Two large volumes of the “Official Records” of Governor Dinwiddie have been published by the Virginia Historical Society (Richmond, Va., 1884), and throw a flood of light on colonial history, 1751-1758. Governor Dinwiddie is mentioned in Thackeray’s “Virginians.” He married Rebecca, daughter of the Rev. J. Affleck, and left two daughters, Elizabeth and Rebecca (No. 12). A younger brother of the Governor’s was Provost Lawrence Dinwiddie (No. 474). The Provost and the Governor were original partners in the Delftfield Pottery Co. of Glasgow. (See No. 1851.)
PAINTER – Allan Ramsay, about 1758.
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Lent by Miss Dinwiddie, London.
12. ELIZABETH and REBECCA DINWIDDIE.
Elizabeth, born 1738; died, 1773. Rebecca, born, 1742; died,      .
Daughters of Governor Dinwiddie (No. 11). Elizabeth died unmarried at Clifton, and was buried in the old Church there, where her sister erected a monument to her. Rebecca accompanied her father on a visit to Scotland after his return from Virginia in 1758, and on 5th September of that year was made “a Burgess of the Burgh of Renfrew.” She married “Archibald Hamilton. Esq., of the Isle of Man,” but died without children.
PAINTER – Allan Ramsay.
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Lent by John B. Cowan, M.D.
13. HENRY MARSHALL.
Born, 1653; died, 1727.
Surgeon in Glasgow. Son of Patrick Marshall, surgeon in Kilsyth (died 1697). Buried in the High Churchyard. His family Bible, in the possession of his descendant, the lender, describes him as “Physic. Apothec., Glasgow, 1684.” He married Margaret Storrie, grand-daughter of John, 3rd Earl of Wigton, and Lady Jane Drummond, eldest daughter of the 2nd Earl of Perth. She succeeded to the property of Nethercroy, which ultimately fell to Lillias Horsburgh, wife of Robert Cowan of Grahamston, Glasgow. After a long dispute with the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, Henry Marshall was admitted into that body, and became visitor and librarian. In 1696 he was consulted professionally regarding the famous Bargaran witchcraft case.
PAINTER – School of Sir Godfrey Kneller.
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Lent by Miss C. C. Dunlop, Edinburgh.
14. JOHN CORBETT of Tolcross.
Born, 1729; died, 1815.
Merchant. Son of James Corbett of Tolcross (No. 94). Married, 1748, Janet Callendar, and was father of Cunningham Corbett, a well-known citizen of Glasgow, who was Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce in 1802 and 1803.
Painter unknown.
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_20180320_000453

Lent by William Henry Hill, LL.D.
15. THOMAS HUTCHESON.
Born about 1590; died, 1641.
Founder of Hutchesons’ School, and a large benefactor to his brother’s Hospital. Was the younger son and fifth child of Thomas Hutcheson of Hutchesontown and Lambhill, by Helen Herbertsone his spouse. He was left fatherless when about five years old, and his brother George (No. 38) proved a most affectionate and careful guardian. He received a very thorough education, and, in his own language, this was among “the blessings, and the pious and memorable exampell for which, under God, I am indebted to my brother George.” Married Marion, daughter of James Stewart of Blackhall, but left no issue. (See Nos. 1082, 1099-1101, 1564.)
PAINTER – Supposed to be Anthony Vandyck.
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Lent by the City Parochial Board.
16. JOHN WILSON of Shieldhall.
Born, 1693; died, 1768.
Merchant in Glasgow. An early explorer of the Glasgow coalfield. He bequeathed £450 to the poor of the Town’s Hospital.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
17. The Rev. ZACHARY BOYD.
Born about 1585; died, 1653.
Several times Rector and Dean of Faculty of the University of Glasgow, to which he bequeathed a considerable sum for the college buildings, and in which he also founded bursaries. He was the author of many works, most of which still exist in MS. in the University library. A descendant of the Boyds of Penkill, Ayrshire. (See Nos. 2033, 2035, 2363, 2364, 2367, 2565.)
Painter unknown. This portrait has been engraved in Neil’s edition of Boyd’s “Last Battell of the Soul.” (See No. 2365.)
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Lent by His Grace the Duke of Hamilton.
18. Cardinal DAVID BEATON.
Born, 1494; died, 1546.
Archbishop of St. Andrews and Lord High Chancellor of Scotland. He was a younger son of John Beaton of Balfour. Was educated at the Universities of St. Andrews and Glasgow. His uncle, James Beaton, Archbishop of Glasgow, presented him, in 1519, to the Parsonage of Campsie and the Chancellorship of the Church of Glasgow.
Painter unknown. This picture has been engraved in stipple by S. Freeman.
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Lent by the City Parochial Board.
19. WILLIAM BREADIE.
Born, 1674; died, 1743.
Merchant in Glasgow. Preceptor of the Town’s Hospital, in which office he died. He bequeathed to the Hospital £100.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by Miss Mennons.
20. JOHN MENNONS.
Born about 1746; died, 1818.
Editor. Originator of The Glasgow Advertiser in 1782 (No. 2409), and, with his son Thomas, editor. In 1802 the title was changed to The Glasgow Herald and Advertiser (No. 2413). In 1804 the Mennons family interest in it ceased, and in 1805 it became The Glasgow Herald (No. 2419). He married, first, a daughter of Robert McNair of the Easter Sugar House, and second, in 1786, Jane, daughter of James Steadman, Glasgow, and had issue. (see Nos. 2279, 2521, 2530-2535.)
Painter unknown. Painted about 1790.
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Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
21. JOHN WALLACE of Nielstonside, Cessnock,and Kelly.
Born, 1712; died, 1805.
West India merchant and planter. Second son of Thomas Wallace of Cairnhill, younger brother of John Wallace of Elderslie, whose only child, Helen (No. 84), was heiress of Elderslie. Married, first, Ann, second daughter of Provost John Murdoch (No. 50), whose child died in infancy; second, Jean Porterfield of Duchal, who bore him five children, one of whom became Mrs. Hozier of Newlands; and third, Janet, daughter of Robert Colquhoun of St. Christophers, by whom he had sixteen children, amongst them, Robert Wallace of Kelly, M.P. (No. 550), General Sir James Maxwell Wallace, K.C.B., Frances, who became Mrs. James Murdoch (No. 410), and the centenarian, Ann Wallace (No. 552). (See No. 1070.)
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
22. THOMAS THOMSON.
Born about 1672; died, 1720.
Merchant in Glasgow. Treasurer of the City, 1707. Dean of Guild, 1717, 1718. “Mortified to this House 2,000 merks Scotts, the interest whereof to be given the poor yearly the eighth day of December; who died the 10th October, 1720, in the 49th year of his age.” (See No. 1999.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
23. The Rev. WILLIAM DUNLOP.
Born about 1653; died, 1700.
Principal of the University from 1690 to 1700, to which office he was appointed by William the Third. Son of Alexander Dunlop, by Elizabeth, daughter of William Mure of Glanderston, allied to the Mures of Caldwell. A man of singular piety, public spirit, and universal knowledge.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
24. PATRICK HAMILTON.
Born, 1504; burnt at St. Andrews, 1528.
The first martyr in Scotland to the doctrines of the Reformed religion. His name occurs in the “Acta Rectoria” of the University of Paris – a register of the graduates – under date 1520, as “Patricius Hamelton, Glasguensis nobilis.”
Doubts have been expressed as to the authenticity of this portrait.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.
25. WILLIAM SPANG.
Born, 15—; died, 1608.
Apothecary. Deacon, in 1605, of the “Incorporation of Surgeons and Barbars,” in succession to their first Deacon, Robert Hamiltone (No. 31). James VI.’s Charter of Erection to the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, given at Holyrood House, 29th November, 1599, bears “that no manner of person sell any druggs, in the city of Glasgow, except the same be sighted by the saids visitors [Mr. Peter Lowe (No. 27) and Mr. Robert Hamiltone (No. 31)], and by William Spang, Apothecary, under the pain of confiscation of the druggs.” William Spang is said to have come over from Denmark in the suite of Queen Anne. He settled in Glasgow, and founded a family of some note. By his wife, Christian Hamilton, of the ancient family of Hamilton of Silvertonhill and Provan, he was father of Andrew Spang, a rich merchant in Glasgow, whose eldest son was a Cavalry Colonel, and whose second son was William Spang, minister of the gospel, appointed in 1630 by the Convention of Royal Burghs to the Scottish congregation, then first “plantit” in the “Staple Port, in the town of Campheir,” in Holland. This William Spang (II.) was the “deare and loving cusing” to whom Principal Baillie wrote so many of his letters. Spang and he were “cusings” through their mothers, daughters of Town-clerk Henry Gibson.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the City Parochial Board.
26. ROBERT TENNENT.
Born, 1671; died, 1741.
Merchant in Glasgow. Bailie, 1720, 1723. He bequeathed to the Town’s Hospital £850.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.
27. PETER LOWE.
Born about 1550; died about 1613.
An eminent surgeon. He was author of “A Discovrse of the Whole Art of Chyrvrgerie” (No. 2360), which passed through six editions. In the second edition, published in 1612, he styles himself in the title-page, “Peter Lowe, Scottishman, Doctor in the Facultie of Chirurgerie at Paris, and Ordinary Chirurgion to the French King and Navarre.” He practised twenty-two years in France and Flanders, had been two years surgeon to the Spanish regiments at Paris, and had followed the King of France, Henry IV., six years in his wars, before he settled in Glasgow, about 1595. He found the practice of medicine and surgery in Glasgow and the West of Scotland in the hands of “cosoners, quack-salvers, charlitans, witches, charmers, and divers other sorts of abusers,” on a representation of which to James VI., “His Majesty and Honourable Council thought not to be tolerated,” and granted to Dr. Lowe and others, in 1599, the charter of Incorporation of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, in which he is designed as “Maister Peter Lowe, our Chirurgiane, and Chief Chirurgiane to oure dearest son the Prince.” From the records of the city, it is evident that he was a leading citizen in his day. He was one of the Commissioners for the settlement of the differences between the Merchants and Crafts in 1604. He married Helen, daughter of Mr. David Weems, minister of the High Church of Glasgow, and had issue, a son, John. Helen Weems married, second, Walter Stirling, Dean of Guild, 1638, 1639. His tomb, with a quaint inscription, is on the south wall of the Cathedral burying-ground, near the entrance gate. It is now the property of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons. (See Nos. 1461, 2359-2361.)
Painter unknown.
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_20180320_000619

Lent by the University of Aberdeen.
28. Bishop WILLIAM ELPHINSTONE.
Born, 1431; died, 1514.
Educated at the Grammar School and University of Glasgow. After his ordination as priest, he was for four years Rector of St. Michael’s, Trongate . Thereafter he proceeded to the University of Paris. He returned from France about 1471, and was appointed Parson of Glasgow and Official of the diocese. He was Rector of the University in 1474. Became Bishop of Ross, 1481; was translated to Aberdeen, 1484; Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, 1488. He founded King’s College, Aberdeen, in 1500.
PAINTER – Alexander, after the original now unknown.
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_20180320_000710

Lent by the University of Glasgow.
29. The Rev. ALEXANDER HENDERSON.
Born, 1583; died at Edinburgh, 1646.
An eminent minister of the Church of Scotland. He held in succession the offices of Professor of Philosophy at St. Andrews, 1611-1614; minister of Leuchars, in Fife, 1615-1639; first minister of Edinburgh, and Rector of the University there, 1640-1646. He drew up the renewal of the National Covenant in February, 1638, and was Moderator of the memorable General Assembly which met at Glasgow, November 21st, 1638. He resided in London nearly three years, as one of the Commissioners of the Westminster Assembly, in which he took a prominent part.
Painter unknown. This picture has been engraved in stipple by S. Freeman.
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_20180320_000739

Lent by the University of Glasgow.
30. The Rev. ROBERT BOYD of Trochrigue.
Born at Glasgow, 1578; died at Edinburgh, 1627.
Son of James Boyd, of Trochrigg, Archbishop of Glasgow, who was descended from the Boyds of Kilmarnock, and the Earls of Cassilis. Robert Boyd was successively Professor of Philosophy at the College of Montaubon, Professor of Theology at the University of Saumur, Principal of the University of Glasgow, 1615-1621, and Principal of the University of Edinburgh for a few weeks in 1622, 1623. These offices he resigned, in consequence of his unwillingness to conform to the Articles of Perth. He was called to be minister of Paisley in 1625, and died at Edinburgh in January, 1627.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.
31. ROBERT HAMILTONE.
Born, 15—; died, October, 1629.
“Mr. Robert Hamiltone, Professoure of Medecine,” so styled in the charter of the Incorporation of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 1599. When the charter was granted it is probable that “doctor of medicine” and “Professor of medicine” were synonymous terms; at all events, there was no professor of medicine in the University for many years afterwards. Mr. Hamiltone was the first President of the Faculty, and was one of the Commissioners for settling the differences between the Merchants and the Crafts in 1604. He left a son, “Mr. James Hamiltoune.”
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the City Parochial Board.
32. JAMES SPREULL.
Born, 1699; died at Glasgow, 1769.
Merchant in Glasgow. Treasurer of the City, 1753, and Bailie, 1755. Son of “Bass John” (No. 101). He gave of his time and lent of his money to the Town’s Hospital and to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in the Highlands and Islands. This picture was in the old Town’s Hospital: a replica of it is in the office, in Edinburgh, of the Society above named.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
33. JOHN TRAN.
Born, 16—; died, 1704.
Professor of Philosophy in the University of Glasgow from 1669 to 1704.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
34. ANN KELBURN or BARCLAY.
Born, 1697; died, 17—.
Daughter of James Kelburn and Alison Setoun. Married David Barclay, and had, besides a daughter who married her cousin Robert Anderson of Overgree, a son, Robert Barclay of Capelrig, writer in Glasgow. (See No. 2375.)
PAINTER – Andrew or Robert Foulis, and presented by them to Robert Barclay of Capelrig. (See No. 44.)
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Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
35. JOHN LUKE, Younger of Claythorn.
Born about 1665; died, 1731.
Merchant. Son of John Luke of Claythorn (No. 102). Married Martha, daughter of Matthew Miller of Glenlee, by whom he left issue. “Left to the poor of this House 4000 Merks Scots, the interest to be given to a decayed merchant yearly. He died the 22nd day of March, 1731, in the 67th year of his age.” His widow died, 1762, aged 86. (See No. 1999.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the City Parochial Board.
36. ROBERT CURRIE.
Born, 1679; died, 1760.
Merchant in Glasgow. For eight years Preceptor of the Town’s Hospital, to which he bequeathed £100.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by the University of Glasgow.
37. ROBERT SIMSON, M.D.
Born at Kirktonhill, 14th Oct., 1687; died, 1st Oct., 1768.
Professor of Mathematics in the University of Glasgow. He was the eldest son of John Simson, of Kirktonhill, and educated at Glasgow University, where, his mathematical capacity being recognised, he was appointed professor in 1711. He occupied the chair for fifty years, and acquired great reputation both as mathematician and as teacher. He is now best known by his edition of Euclid, of which all modern editions are little more than reprints. Among his pupils were Colin Maclaurin, James Stirling, Mathew Stewart, and Professor Robison of Edinburgh.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by William Henry Hill, LL.D.
38. GEORGE HUTCHESON.
Born between 1550 and 1560; died, 1639.
Founder of Hutchesons’ Hospital. Was the eldest son of Thomas Hucheson, of Huchesontoun and Lambhill, and Helen Herbertsone his spouse. This Thomas Hucheson was son of John Hucheson of Gairbraid, who belonged to an old Glasgow race. in 1471 a pious and worthy man, George Huchesone, made a gift of a sum of money to the vicars of the choir, and other charitable members of the family are on record. Thomas Huchesone and Helen Herbertsone had issue besides George, Janet, and Elizabeth, Helen, who married Ninian Hill of Garioch, the direct ancestor of Laurence Hill, LL.D. (No. 202), and Thomas, the founder of Hutchesons’ School (No. 15). George Hutcheson married Elizabeth Craig, but left no lawful issue. (See Nos. 1096-1098, 1569.)
PAINTER – George Scougall.
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Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
39. JAMES CORBET of Kenmuir and Stockbriggs.
Born, 1646; died, 1735.
Merchant in Glasgow. Father of James Corbet, Junior (No. 48). This portrait was painted in 1732 when he was 86 years of age. (See Nos. 1255 and 1280.)
PAINTER – W. Frier.
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_20180320_000912

Lent by Miss Riddell, Edinburgh.
40. ARCHBISHOP JAMES LAW.
Born about 1560; died, 1632.
Son of John Law of Spittel, near Dunfermline. Became minister of Kirkliston, 1585; Bishop of Orkney, 1605; Archbishop of Glasgow, 1615. Married first, Marion, daughter of Dundas of Newliston; second, Grissall Boswell; and third, Marion, daughter of John Boyle of Kelburne.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Colin Dunlop Donald.
41. JAMES DONALD of Geilston.
Born, 1713; died, 1760.
Virginia merchant. Bailie, 1749, 1753. Brother of Robert Donald (No. 456). Married a daughter of Yuille of Darleith, and was father of Thomas Donald (No. 92), and grandfather of Colin Dunlop Donald (No. 169).
Painter unknown.
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Lent by A. F. Hamilton.
42. DAVID LEITCH.
Born about 1720; died,      .
Merchant in Glasgow. Married Jean Bryson of Craigallian (No. 45), and was father of John Leitch of Kilmardinny, West India merchant.
Painter unknown.
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Lent by Adam Henderson.
43. WILLIAM FRENCH.
Born about 1734; died, 1802.
Virginia merchant. A partner of William Cunningham & Co, afterwards of Alexander Speirs & Co., and French, Crawford & Co. Bailie, 1773, 1776, and Provost of Glasgow, 1778, 1779. In 178- he laid the foundation stone of St. Enoch’s Church. He married Elizabeth Buchanan, who died, 1802, aged 70. He had two shares in the Tontine, his nominees being his son and daughter, William and Mary.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Kerr & Richardson.
44. ANDREW FOULIS.
Born in Glasgow, 1712; died, 1775.
Printer and publisher. Brother of Robert, who was the first to establish a school of the Fine Arts in Britain. For thirty years the firm of Robert and Andrew Foulis produced a series of editions of the Latin and Greek Classics, which, for beauty of print and fidelity of text, were not equalled by any publications of the time. In 1753, Robert Foulis, having visited Italy and engaged teachers, founded in Glasgow his Academy of the Fine Arts. He formed a collection of 459 pictures, numerous drawings by eminent masters, engravings, and casts from statues, for the artistic instruction of the people of Glasgow; but the effort was premature, and the collection was dispersed, the pictures being sold in London in 1776. The casts were actually broken to pieces by workmen, so little were they cared for. (See Nos. 2184-2224.)
PAINTER – McCulloch.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Dennistoun Brown of Balloch Castle.
44A. ALEXANDER BROWN.
Born 2nd January, 1738; died, 6th September, 1803.
Merchant in Glasgow. Bailie in 1779, and Dean of Guild, 1784, 1785. A fine classical scholar and a graceful artist. He designed the seals of several of the Glasgow Incorporations. Son of John Brown (No. 64A). He married, in 1770, Isabella, daughter of John Noble of Ferme and Ardardan Noble, and had issue, James Dennistoun Brown, H.E.I.C.S., grandfather of the lender, and a daughter, Jane, afterwards Mrs. Humphrey Ewing Maclae of Cathkin (see No. 426).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by A. F. Hamilton.
45. JEAN BRYSON of LEITCH.
Born about 1730; died, 17—.
Wife of David Leitch, merchant in Glasgow (No. 42). Youngest daughter and heiress portioner of John Bryson of Craigallian. She and her two sisters succeeded their father about 1749, and sold Craigallian in 1751 to John Park.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Sir David Carrick-Buchanan, K.C.B., of Drumpellier.
46. ANDREW BUCHANAN of Drumpellier.
Born, 1691; died, 1759.
Virginia merchant. Dean of Guild, 1728, 1729, and Provost of Glasgow in 1740, 1741. He, along with his brothers, George, Neil, and Archibald, founded the Buchanan Society in 1725. He was also one of the founders of the Ship Bank, established in 1750. He married Marion Montgomery, and was father of James Buchanan of Drumpellier, Provost of Glasgow, 1768, 1769, 1774, 1775, and of George Buchanan of Mount Vernon (No. 5).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
47. THOMAS PETER of Crossbasket.
Born about 1640; died, 1721.
Merchant in Glasgow Treasurer of the City, 1689; Bailie, 1701, 1712; Dean of Guild, 1707, 1708. “Mortified to this House 3000 merks. Died 10th September, 1721; 81 years of age. Ordered the interest of said sum for ye annual supply of a poor merchant.” (See No. 1999.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
48. JAMES CORBET of Kenmuir and Stockbriggs.
Born about 1690; died, 1754.
Merchant in Glasgow. Son of James Corbet of Kenmuir (No. 39). Married Janet, daughter of Robertoun of Bedlay, and granddaughter of James Robertoun, Lord Bedlay. He was father of Anne Corbet, wife of George Brown, who was Dean of Guild, 1762, 1763, 1770, 1771. (See No. 394.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
49. PETER MURDOCH.
Born at Glasgow, 1670; died at Glasgow, 1761.
Merchant and sugar refiner. Provost of Glasgow in 1730, 1731. Peter Murdoch, with his son, JOhn Murdoch (No. 50), Provost in 1746, 1747, 1750, 1751, 1758, 1759; his son-in-law, Andrew Cochrane (No. 455), Provost 1744, 1745, 1748, 1749; his cousin, John M’Ure, Town-clerk (historian of the City), and others of his family, managed the affairs of the City for may years He married, first, 1696, Mary, daughter of John Luke of Claythorn (No. 102); second, 1712, Ann, daughter of John Alexander, merchant in Glasgow, by both of whom he had issue (see Nos. 64, 2636.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of Stirling’s Library.
50. JOHN MURDOCH of Rosebank.
Born, 1709; died, 1776.
Merchant in Glasgow. Bailie, 1744; Provost, 1746, 1747, 1750, 1751, 1758, 1759. One of the founders of the Glasgow Arms Bank. He built, in 1750, the first house in Argyle Street, that at the east corner of Dunlop Street, afterwards the Buck’s Head Inn (see No. 585). He had also a country house, Rosebank (No. 664). He was a younger son of Provost Peter Murdoch (No. 49), by Mary, daughter of John Luke, Elder of Claythorn (No. 102). He married, in 1732, Margaret, daughter of William Lang, merchant in Glasgow, by whom he had two daughters, Margaret, wife of Sir Thomas Miller of Glenlee (No. 517), and Anne, first wife of John Wallace of Cessnock and Kelly (No. 21). He married second, in 1737, Margaret (No. 78), eldest daughter of John Bogle of Hamilton Farm (No. 79).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
51. HENRIETTA MAXWELL or DUNLOP.
Born,      ; died, 1742.
Daughter of George Maxwell of Southbar. First wife of James Dunlop of Garnkirk (No. 54), and had issue. A daughter, Lilias, married George Buchanan of Mount Vernon (No. 5).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Mrs. Stirling of Glenbervie.
52. ARTHUR CONNELL of Enoch Bank.
Born, 1717; died, 1775.
Merchant in Glasgow. Son of the Rev. Matthew Connell, minister of East Kilbride. Married in 1747 Magdalen, daughter of Thomas Wallace of Cairnhill, representative of the Wallaces of Elderslie, and had issue (Nos. 482, 484, 486). Commanded a company of the Glasgow Volunteers at the Battle of Falkirk in 1746. Dean of Guild, 1764, 1765; Bailie, 1770; and Provost of Glasgow, 1772, 1773. One of the founders of the great West India house of Somervell, Connell & Co., afterwards Somervell, Gordon, & Co., and ultimately Stirling, Gordon, & Co. Enoch Bank house stood exactly on the site of the new buildings of the Sun Insurance Co., at the intersection of West George Street and Renfield Street; the grounds, containing 3½ acres, stretched thence to the old Sauchiehaugh Road, or Swan’s Yett Lone, now Sauchiehall Street. (See No. 485.)
PAINTER – R. Harvie, 1758.
—∴—

_20180320_001011

Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
53. JOHN DUNLOP (1st) of Garnkirk.
Born, 15—; died, 1662.
Merchant. Burgess of Glasgow, 1631. Third son of James Dunlop of that ilk. Acquired Garnkirk in 1634. Married Elizabeth Dunlop, widow of John Mackldune, merchant burgess of Glasgow, and had a son, James (2nd) of Garnkirk (No. 58). (See No. 1986.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
54. JAMES DUNLOP (4th) of Garnkirk.
Born, 1697; died, 1769.
Burgess of Glasgow, 1754. Son of James Dunlop (3rd) of Garnkirk (No. 59). Married, 1722, Henrietta (No. 51), daughter of George Maxwell of Southbar. He married, second, Jean Campbell; and third, Margaret, daughter of James Hamilton of Cochna; but had issue only by his first wife, one of whose daughters, Lilias, married George Buchanan of Mount Vernon (No. 5).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the City Parochial Board.
55. GEORGE SCOTT.
Born, 1730; died at London, 1767.
East India merchant. Bequeathed £100 to the poor of the Town’s Hospital.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
56. JOHN AIRD, Junior.
Born about 1655; died, 1730.
Merchant in Glasgow. Bailie, 1692, 1697, 1701; Dean of Guild, 1695, 1696, 1699, 1700, 1703, 1704; and Provost, 1705, 1706, 1709, 1710, 1713, 1714, 1717, 1718, 1721, 1722. Commanded the Glasgow regiment of 600 men which garrisoned Stirling during the rebellion of 1715. He married Katherine Campbell, sister of Sir James Campbell of Houstoun, but left no issue. His widow married, second, Alexander Cunninghame of Craigends, and died, 1757. “MOrtified to the poor of this House several tenements of land paying of yearly rent £621 11s. 8d. Scots, whereof £100 Scots to be paid yearly to a poor merchant and £200 Scots equally among three poor merchants’ or ministers’ widows of this city; who died 21st April, 1730, in the 76th year of his age.” (See Nos. 1999, 2009.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
57. ROBERT HAMILTON of Airdrie.
Born, 1714; died, 1756.
This portrait has been supposed to be that of Robert Hamilton, merchant, who was born in 1754, and died, unmarried, at St. Helena, on his way home from India, in 1799 having realised a considerable fortune in China, the bulk of which he left to the University of Glasgow. This Robert Hamilton, however, never owned Airdrie, and the portrait is more probably that of his father, Robert Hamilton of Airdrie, born, 1714, who married Mary, daughter of John Baird of Craigton. He was the representative of the Hamiltons, Baronets of Preston and Fingalton, The last of these, in the direct line, was Robert Hamilton, the leader of the Covenanters at Drumclog and Bothwell Bridge. From his death, in 1701, the title was in abeyance till it was resumed by his representative the late Sir William Hamilton, the well-known metaphysician (No. 341A).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
58. JAMES DUNLOP (2nd) of Garnkirk.
Born, 1631; died, 1695.
Member of the Faculty of Procurators, and a burgess of Glasgow. Son of John Dunlop (1st) of Garnkirk (No. 53). Married, 1654, Elizabeth (No. 63), daughter of James Robertoun of Bedlay.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
59. JAMES DUNLOP (3rd) of Garnkirk.
Born, 16—; died, 1719.
Lawyer. Burgess of Glasgow, 1708. Son of James Dunlop (2nd) of Garnkirk (No. 58). Married, first, 1689, Lilias (No. 62), daughter of Robert Campbell of Northwoodside and Katharine Napier (No. 91); second, Mary Douglas, by the  latter of whom he had no children. He was succeeded by his son James (4th) of Garnkirk (No. 54).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
60. JAMES GOVANE.
Born about 1653; died, 1715.
Merchant in Glasgow. Brother of JOhn Govane of Hogganfield, whose daughter, Margaret, married Provost James Peadie, Younger of Ruchill (see No. 69). Married Jean Tran, but left no issue. “Mortified to this House £7525 Scots, the interest thereof to be distributed quarterly to seven poor men of the Merchant rank.” (See No. 1999.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
61. JAMES DUNLOP.
Born about 1754; died in America,      .
Son of James Dunlop, and grandson of James Dunlop (4th) of Garnkirk (No. 54). His mother was Mary, daughter of John Ritchie of Craigton.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
62. LILIAS CAMPBELL or DUNLOP.
Born, 16—; died, 1709, aged 34.
Wife of James Dunlop (3rd) of Garnkirk (No. 59). Said to have been married at 14 years of age and to have been the mother of sixteen children.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House.
63. ELIZABETH ROBERTOUN or DUNLOP.
Born, 16—; died, 1695.
Wife of James Dunlop (2nd) of Garnkirk (No. 58), and daughter of James Robertoun of Bedlay.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch of Capelrig.
64. PETER MURDOCH.
Born, 1704; died, 1734.
Merchant. Eldest son of Provost Peter Murdoch (No. 49). Married, in August, 1732, Margaret, youngest daughter of Sir Archibald Stewart of Blackhall, Bart., who bore him one child, a son, Peter (No. 172). She married, second, John Orr of Barrowfield (No. 107), and died, 1794, aged 88.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Dennistoun Brown of Balloch Castle.
64A. JOHN BROWN.
Born,      ; died, 1757.
Merchant in Glasgow. Dean of Guild in 1746, 1747, and Provost in 1752. Son of Captain Alexander Brown, R.N. Married Jean, daughter of John Dennistoun of Colgrain, and had a son, Alexander (No. 44A).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by T. Craig Christie of Bedlay.
65. JOHN CROSS.
Born, 1671; died, 1732.
West India proprietor and merchant. Dean of Guild, 1694, and Bailie, 1692 and 1695. Father of Sheriff Cross (No. 66). M’Ure, in his “History of Glasgow,” says that “in 1669 there were five merchants concern’d in the Easter Sugar-house, viz., John Cross, James Peadie, John Luke, George Bogle, and Robert Cross, who put in a joynt stock for carrying on another sugar-work, and built large buildings… and employed a German to be master-boiler. This project likewise proved effectual, so that their stock wonderfully increased; the representers of four of those partners does now enjoy the same, viz., John Graham of Dougalston, the heirs of Provost Peadie, Robert Bogle, and Robert Cross.” And in the 1830 edition of the same work, the following extracts are given from the family Bible of Robert Cross (No. 69), father of our subject, and Dean of Guild and Bailie of Glasgow, 1684, 1685:- “October 23, 1663. – – I was maried in the Laighe Churtch, at on a cloke in the afternoon, by Maister Edwart Wright, then Principall of the Coledg of Glasgow, upon Joanet Peadie, secound dochter to Thomas Peadie, merchant in Glasgow: shoo was baptized the 22 day of September, 1643. Godfathers James Peadie & Thomas Findlay. Shoo departit this lyfe, Saterday, the 28 day of May, 1687. Ane dochter, born Martch 3, 1670, calit Issobel. Martch 21, 1695. – Shoo was married to James Lowk, goldsmith, son to John Lowk, merchant in Glasgow, in my own hous, by Maister James Widrow, Professor of Divinity in the Colledge of Glasgow. December 8, 1695. – My son John was married to Joan Walkinshaw, eldest dochter to William Walkinshaw of Scotstowne, in his own hows, by Maister Neill Gillis, on of the towne ministers. Scotstowne said shoo was 17 yeirs of age. My son was borne Aug. 26, 1671.” His son John carries down the family history, of which this is a short specimen: “June 25, 1711. – Betwixt eight and nine in the morning, my wife brought forth a son; baptised in the Laigh Church by Mr. James Clark, on of the ministers in this place, baptised on Tuesday, the 10th of July, called William.”
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by T. Craig Christie of Bedlay.
66. WILLIAM CROSS of Parkhouse.
Born at Glasgow, 1711; died, 1775.
Advocate. Appointed Professor of Law in Glasgow University in 1745, and subsequently Sheriff of Lanarkshire. He took an active interest against the Jacobites, and, besides the proofs of his zeal contained in “The Cochrane Correspondence,” published by the Maitland Club, he was the occasional correspondent of President Forbes. In 1745 he published “A Loyal Address to the Citizens of Glasgow”; and in 1748 he wrote an essay “On the means of Civilizing the Highlands, and Extinguishing Jacobitism in Scotland.” He was with the Glasgow Volunteers at Falkirk, and wrote an account of the battle. He is said to have been an eminent agriculturist, and the first who introduced the cultivation of turnips in the fields in the neighbourhood of Glasgow, in 1756. He died at Parkhouse, Renfrewshire, at the age of 64. It may be noted as an illustration of the divisions in families, caused by the early troubles of the eighteenth century, that Sheriff Cross’s father, Bailie John Cross (No. 65), married, first, Joan, daughter of Walkinshaw of Scotstown, a notorious Jacobite,attainted for his share in the enterprise of 1745; and second, Agnes, daughter of William Crawfurd, of the Crawfurdland family, mother of the Sheriff, who, as already stated, supported the opposite side. (See Nos. 2451, 2631.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—

_20180320_001039

Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
67. MARY BUCHANAN or SPEIRS.
Born, 173–; died, 1818.
Second wife of Alexander Speirs of Elderslie (No. 70), and daughter of Archibald Buchanan of Auchintorlie (a younger brother of Provost Andrew Buchanan, No. 46), by his wife Martha Murdoch, daughter of Provost Peter Murdoch (No. 49). Mrs. Speirs’ picture hangs in the Merchants’ Hall, the only woman’s picture there. it is a happy exception that gives us her beautiful face – beautiful on the verge of old age – and her sweet and gracious air.
PAINTER – Sir Daniel Macnee, P.R.S.A., after Sir John Watson Gordon, B.A., P.R.S.A.
—∴—
Lent by James Finlayson, M.D.
68. BENJAMIN CAMPBELL.
Born, 17—; died at Maidstone, January, 1829, aged 36.
Physician and surgeon. Assistant staff surgeon, cavalry depot, Maidstone. A native of Glasgow, and licentiate of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons.
PAINTER – Dudgeon of Glasgow, from a miniature executed by a native of India.
—∴—
Lent by T. Craig Christie of Bedlay.
69. ROBERT CROSS [or CORSE].
Born, 1639; died, 1705.
Merchant in Glasgow. Dean of Guild in 1684, and Bailie in 1685. He was the father of John Cross (No. 65), and married Janet, daughter of Thomas Peadie. His daughter, Isobel, born 1670, was married to James Luke, goldsmith, son of John Luke of Claythorn (No. 102), and father of Robert Luke (No. 103), in whose features may be traced the family likeness to his maternal grandfather, Robert Cross. James Peadie of Roughhill, brother of Mrs. Robert Cross, married Anne, daughter of Alexander Porterfield, brother of the Laird of Duchal, and was Provost 1691, 1692, 1697, 1698. His son James, Younger of Roughhill, was Provost in 1727, and died in 1728.
Painter unknown. This is a copy from the original picture.
—∴—

_20180320_001110

Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
70. ALEXANDER SPEIRS of Elderslie.
Born, 1714; died, 10th December, 1782.
Virginia merchant. Treasurer of the City, 1755; Bailie, 1757 and 1762. One of “the four young men,” John Glassford of Dougalston (No. 461), William Cuninghame of Lainshaw, James Ritchie of Busbie, and himself, who first made Glasgow an important place of trade. At the outbreak of the American War – when so many of the Virginia merchants were ruined – Alexander Speirs was the largest holder of tobacco in Glasgow, or indeed in Europe, and he realised a great fortune from the rise in price. He bought various estates in Renfrewshire. He formed these into a barony, which he named Elderslie from the most notable of his purchases – the Elderslie of Sir William Wallace, lying to the west of Paisley. He bought this in 1767 from Helen Wallace, heiress of Elderslie (No. 84). His mansion, to which he gave the name of Elderslie House, stands on a separate property on the Clyde just above Renfrew. The old name of this property was King’s Inch; it was originally an island, lying between the present channel of the Clyde and an extinct channel to the south, which can be still traced in Elderslie park. In 1770 he bought as his town residence the famous “Virginia Mansion” (see Nos. 5, 608). There is a monument to him, erected by his friends on his death, in St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Greendyke Street. Married, first, Sarah Carey; second, Mary (No. 67), daughter of Archibald Buchanan of Auchintorlie.
PAINTER – Sir Daniel Macnee, P.R.S.A., after William Cochran.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Merchants’ House.
71. ROBERT SANDERS of Auldhouse.
Born, 16—; died, 1730.
Bookseller and printer in Glasgow. Son of Robert Sanders, “printer to the city of Glasgow,” who died, 1696. Left his lands of Auldhouse and other heritable property to the Merchants’ House. “MOrtified to this House in 1726 and 1727 a capital, the interest of which is £69 8s. 10d., to be applied towards putting 11 boys to be apprentices, 5 tradesmen, and 6 merchants alternately, and for payment of £100 Scots yearly to a student at the University of Glasgow.” (See Nos. 1999, 2054-2057, 2067-2070, 2077-2082.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Isabella Dunlop, Edinburgh.
72. —— BOGLE or MURDOCH.
Born,      ; died, 17—.
Daughter of Bogle of Hamilton Farm, and wife of George Murdoch (No. 73).
PAINTER – Gavin Hamilton.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Isabella Dunlop, Edinburgh.
73. GEORGE MURDOCH.
Born,      ; died, 17—.
Mechant in Glasgow Bailie, 1744, 1747; Dean of Guild, 1750, 1751; Provost in 1754, 1755. Son of James Murdoch, merchant, Glasgow. (Se No. 2379.)
PAINTER – This picture is inscribed “Alexander pingebat, 1757.”
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Hamilton Donald.
74. ARCHIBALD BOGLE.
Born, 1730; died, 1812.
Merchant in Glasgow. Second son of Robert Bogle (3rd) of Shettleston by his second wife, Agnes, daughter of Sir Archibald Stewart of Blackhall, Bart. Married Janet Cathcart, daughter of Hugh Cathcart and Helen Wardrop, by whom he had, with other issue, Robert, who acquired Gilmorehill in 1800, and Helen (No. 500), wife of Provost John Hamilton of Northpark (No. 371).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Rev Henry M. Hamilton, D.D.
75. MARTHA BOGLE or DUNLOP.
Probably another portrait of the same lady as No. 85.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Rev. Henry M. Hamilton, D.D.
76. MARY BOGLE or HAMILTON.
Born, 17—; died 26th July, 1808.
Daughter of John Bogle of Hamilton Farm (No. 79), and wife of the Rev. John Hamilton, D.D., of the High Church (No. 104).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Brown of Lanfine.
77. GEORGE BOGLE of Daldowie.
Born, 1701; died, 1782.
Virginia merchant. Son of Robert Bogle, merchant in Glasgow, who acquired Daldowie in 1724. Lord Rector of the University, 1737, 1743, 1747, 1757. He married Ann, daughter of Sir John Sinclair of Stevenston, by whom he had, with other issue, Robert, who succeeded him, and Martha, wife of Thomas Brown of Langside, and mother of Thomas Brown, M.D., of Waterhaughs and Lanfine (No. 379), who was father of the lender. (See Nos. 800, 833.)
PAINTER – Sir John Medina.
—∴—
Lent by the Rev. Henry M. Hamilton, D.D.
78. MARGARET BOGLE or MURDOCH.
Born, 17—; died,      .
Eldest daughter of John Bogle of Hamilton Farm (No. 79), and second wife of John Murdoch of Rosebank (No. 50).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Rev. Henry M. Hamilton, D.D.
79. JOHN BOGLE of Hamilton Farm.
Born about 1679; died, 1752.
Merchant. Married Janet, daughter of Matthew Miller of Glenlee, and had, with other issue, Patrick of Hamilton Farm; William, who succeeded Patrick’s son John in the estate; Martha (No. 85), wife of Provost Colin Dunlop (No. 82); Mary (No. 76), wife of the Rev. John Hamilton, D.D,. of the High Church (No. 104); and Margaret (No. 78), second wife of John Murdoch of Rosebank (No. 50).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Trades’ House.
80. JAMES THOMSON.
Born, 16—; died at Glasgow, 1717.
Tanner in Glasgow He bequeathed twelve thousand merks to the Trades’ House for the maintenance of six poor old men of the Trades rank, the names Thomson or Peddie being preferred.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Findlay, Newton House, Millerhill.
81. ARCHIBALD BUCHANAN of Drumhead.
Born, 16—; died, 1735.
Merchant in Glasgow. Married, in 1720, Janet, daughter of Gilbert Buchanan of Bankel, Dean of Guild, 1721, 1722, and grand-daughter of William Napier, Provost, 1693-1694.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Colin R. Dunlop.
82. COLIN DUNLOP of Carmyle.
Born, 1706; died, 1777.
Virginia merchant. Head of the well-known Virginia house of Colin Dunlop & Sons. One of the six founders of the old Ship Bank in 1750. Bailie in 1747, 1761; Dean of Guild, 1758, 1759; and Provost in 1770, 1771. His handsome town residence still stands in the south side of Argyle Street, the second east from Dunlop Street, which was named after him. Sixth son of James Dunlop (3rd) of Garnkirk (No. 59). Married Martha (No. 85), daughter of John Bogle of Hamilton Farm (No. 79), and was father of James Dunlop of Garnkirk (No. 122) and of Provost John Dunlop (No. 119).
PAINTER – Attributed to Gavin Hamilton.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Findlay, Newton House, Millerhill.
83. JANET BUCHANAN or BUCHANAN.
Born, 16—; died, 1735.
Daughter of Gilbert Buchanan of Bankel by Dorothea Napier. She became wife of Archibald Buchanan of Drumhead (No. 81).
Painter unknown.
—∴—

_20180320_001257

Lent by Lady Campbell of Garscube.
84. HELEN WALLACE or CAMPBELL.
Born at Elderslie, 1712; died at Garscube, 1767.
Only child of John Wallace of Elderslie, merchant in Glasgow, who represented the family of Sir William Wallace. She married Archibald Campbell of Succoth, and was mother of Sir Ilay Campbell, President of the Court of Session, and John Campbell, Jun., Provost of Glasgow, 1788. In 1767, with her husband’s consent, she sold Elderslie to Alexander Speirs (No. 70), in whose family it still remains.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Colin R. Dunlop.
85. MARTHA BOGLE or DUNLOP.
Born, 17—; died, 17—.
Daughter of John Bogle of Hamilton Farm (No. 79). Wife of Provost Colin Dunlop of Carmyle (No. 82).
PAINTER – Attributed to Gavin Hamilton.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Findlay, Newton House, Millerhill.
86. ROBERT DUNLOP of Househill.
Born, 1700; died, 1762.
Merchant in Glasgow. One of the six founders of the Ship Bank in 1750. Second surviving son of James Dunlop (3rd) of Garnkirk (No. 59), and brother of Provost Colin Dunlop of Carmyle (No. 82). Married, first, Elizabeth, daughter of John Baird of Craigton; second, Janet, second daughter of Archibald Buchanan of Drumhead (No. 81).
Painter unknown. This picture is a copy from the original painting.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Trades’ House.
87. JAMES MUIRHEAD.
Born in Glasgow, 1657; died in Glasgow, 1727.
Baker in Glasgow. He gifted to the Incorporation of Bakers five hundred merks, and bequeathed to the same body six thousand merks – the interest to be applied towards the support of three poor old freemen thereof; and five hundred merks – the interest to be applied every second year in paying apprentice-fee of a boy descended of honest parents; and to the General Session of Glasgow, one thousand merks – the interest to be distributed among the general poor yearly.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the Directors of the Trades’ House.
88. JON STEVENSON.
Born, 16—; died, 17—.
Deacon of the Incorporation of Cordiners, 1705, 1706, 1709, 1710. Left his means and estate to the Incorporation, with the burden of portion to his children and “oyes,” and of 200 merks to be distributed yearly among the poor of the trade.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss C. C. Dunlop, Edinburgh.
89. —— CORBETT.
Born, 17—; died, 17—.
Daughter of James Corbett of Tolcross (No. 94) and his wife, Jean Porterfield (No. 93). Sister of No. 90.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss C. C. Dunlop, Edinburgh.
90. —— CORBETT.
Born, 17—; died, 17—.
Daughter of James Corbett of Tolcross (No. 94) and his wife, Jean Porterfield (No. 93). Sister of No. 89.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Findlay, Newton House, Millerhill.
91. KATHERINE NAPIER or CAMPBELL.
Born, 16—; died, 1678.
Second daughter of John Napier of Kilmahew. Married, 1673, Robert Campbell, afterwards of Northwoodside, merchant in Glasgow, and Dean of Guild 1678, 1679, and 1686, 1687. Their daughter, Lilias Campbell (No. 62), married James Dunlop (3rd) of Garnkirk (No. 59).
Painter unknown. A copy.
—∴—
Lent by Colin Dunlop Donald.
92 THOMAS DONALD of Geilston.
Born, 1745; died, 1798.
Virginia merchant. Son of James Donald (No. 41). Married Janet, daughter of Provost Colin Dunlop of Carmyle (No. 82), and their son was Colin Dunlop Donald (No. 169).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss C. C. Dunlop, Edinburgh.
93. JEAN PORTERFIELD or CORBETT.
Born, 17—; died, 17—.
Wife of James Corbett of Tolcross (No. 94). Eldest daughter of Alexander Porterfield of Porterfield by Lady Catherine Boyd, daughter of William, 1st Earl of Kilmarnock.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by Miss C. C. Dunlop, Edinburgh.
94. JAMES CORBETT of Tolcross.
Born, 1689; died, 1767.
Son of John Corbett of Tolcross. Married, in 1728, Jean Porterfield (No. 93), and had issue (Nos. 89 and 90).
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
95. Rev. JOHN BELL.
Born before 1560; died (at a great age), 1641.
He was inducted in 1592 to St. Mary’s or Tron Kirk, being the first minister after it became a Presbyterian place of worship. In 1604 he was chosen, with Provost Sir George Elphingston, Knight, and others, as oversman and oddsman in the submission between the merchants and crsftsmen of the city, which resulted in the famous Letter of Guildry of 1605. In the year 1638 he was appointed, as the oldest minister in the bounds, to preach the opening sermon before the great General Assembly held that year in Glasgow. He married Janet Rowat, by whom he had, with other issue, Jean, wife of George Luke of Merkdaily, father of John Luke, Elder of Claythorn (No. 102).
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
96. JOHN STIRLING.
Born, 1677; died, 1736.
Bailie, 1716, 1724, and Provost of Glasgow in 1728, 1729. The name of “John Stirling, late Provost,” appears in M’Ure’s list of merchants “trading to Virginia, Carribey Islands, &c.” He was the great-grandson of Walter Stirling, merchant in Glasgow, who was Dean of Guild in 1637, and died 1656. He was the father of William Stirling, born, 1717, founder of the famous calico-printing frim of William Stirling & Sons, still flourishing in this city. He was also uncle of Bailie Walter Stirling, founder of Stirling’s Library. His eldest daughter, Isabella, married Andrew Aiton, Provost of Glasgow, 1738, 1739. His second daughter, Janet, who was born, 1707, and died, 1800, married Robert Luke (No. 103).
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
97. WILLIAM STIRLING.
Born, 1780; died, 1847.
Son of John Stirling of Tullichewan. A partner of William Stirling & Sons, calico-printers and turkey-red dyers (see No. 96).
Photograph, from the portrait by Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
98. RICHARD OSWALD of Scotstoun.
Born at Watten Manse, 1687; died at Scotstoun House, 1766.
An early Virginia merchant. The first comer of a Caithness family that sent us several good citizens. Son to the Rev. James Oswald, minister of Watten. Traded to Virginia, the West Indies, and Madeira. Of the 43 ships and brigantines and sloops that made up the foreign fleet of Glasgow in 1735, three belonged to his firm. Oswalds & Co. were afterwards Oswald, Dennistoun & Co., the predecessors of Dennistoun, Buchanan & Co., a firm famous in our own day. Richard Oswald built Oswald’s Land in the Stockwell for his town house, counting-house, and cellars for the tobacco and the madeira. He was buried in the nave of Glasgow Cathedral, in a family burial-place said to have been granted for his good services to the Town as one of the six Commissioners to the Rebels in the ’45. (See No. 2617.)
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
99. GEORGE OSWALD of Scotstoun and Auchincruive.
Born at Dunnet Manse, 1735; died at Scotstoun House, 1819.
Virginia merchant. Partner in the Ship Bank. Lord Rector of the University in 1797. Son to Rev. George Oswald, D.D., minister of Dunnet (the northmost parish in Scotland), and afterwards of Methven, and nephew of the Rev. James Oswald, minister of Watten (see No. 98). The Watten minister, being ordained in 1683, was an Episcopalian curate. His brother, the Dunnet minister, being ordained in 1697, was a Presbyterian miister. George Oswald swucceeded in 1766 to Scotstoun on the death of his father’s cousin, Richard Oswald of Scotstoun (No. 98), and in 1784 to Auchincruive on the death of his father’s brother, Richard Oswald of Auchincruive.
Photograph, from the portrait painted at Bath by Thomas Gainsborough, R.A.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
100. ELIZABETH OSWALD of Scotstoun.
Born at Scotstoun, 1767; died there, 1864.
Daughter of George Oswald of Scotstoun (No. 99), by his wife, Margaret Smyth of Methven. Long known and much respected as “Old Miss Oswald,” a woman full of good works and deeds of charity.
Photograph, from the portrait by John graham Gilbert, R.S.A.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
101. JOHN SPREULL, alias “BASS JOHN.”
Born, 1646; died, 1722.
Apothecary and merchant. Born in Paisley. Son to Bailie John Spreull, a cadet of Cowdon. A notable sufferer from the Stuart tyranny (not to be confounded with his cousin, also a sufferer, John Spreull, Town-clerk of Glasgow, author of “The Lord’s Dealings with me”). In 1681, the Privy Council, having imprisoned him and fined him, and booted and better booted him,and made nothing of it all, threw John Spreull into the Bass to rot to death. But rot he would not,and six years thereafter,when the Council were sick of the whole place,and had given their release for the asking to all the prisoners (including the Town-clerk cousin), John Spreull declined to ask anything of the sort, he being (as he explained to the Council) in the right and they in the wrong. The unhappy Council at last fairly opened the door to him, and out he marched with all the honours of war. He was ever after known as “Bass John.” From the Bass he returned here to his old business, “dealing in everything from pills to pearls, and trading everywhere from the Islands of the East Indies to Surrinam, an Dutch Plantation.” He made a good fortune,and subscribed £1000 (one of the largest subscriptions) to the Darein Scheme. He built “Spreull’s Land” in the Trongate. His collateral descendants still own it under a strict entail, the only entail left in the Old Burgh since the sale of the Blythswood Mansion in the Briggate. In the “Miscellaneous Writings of John Spreull” (printed by his collateral descendant John William Burns of Kilmahew) there is a delicious “Representation by “Bass John,” anent his seat in his parish church, telling how Provost Montgomery did most wrongously, with two officers with halberts, upon the Lord’s day, turn him out of his seat, and give it to Blackhall, he being no heritor here.”
Photograph, from the portrait by Sir Godfrey Kneller.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
102. JOHN LUKE, Elder of Claythorn.
Born, 16—; died in 1702.
Merchant. Master of Works in 1646, and Treasurer of the City in 1652, 1654, and 1660. He was concerned with his father-in-lw, John Anderson, Elder of Dowhill (No. 105), as a “sea adventurer,” and joint proprietor of the ship “Providence”; and also as a partner in the soap-work established in 1667. This “Soaperie and Candle-work” stood at the head of what is now the Candleriggs, so named after it. He was the grandfather of Robert Luke (No. 103).
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
103. ROBERT LUKE.
Born about 1700; died, 1752.
Goldsmith. Treasurer of the City in 1730. M’Ure, writing in 1736, says, in his account of “public works” within the city, “There is a stately Brewarie belonging to Robert Luke, Goldsmith, consisting of a large Killn, Lofts, Cellars, and other Store-houses, with all Easements and other Pertinents thereto belonging.” This “brewarie” stood in the Gallowgate, on the “Brook or Rivolet Molendinar.” He is also mentioned by M’Ure as one of the proprietors of an “iron manufactory,” situated near the “great Key or Harbour at the Breamie-law,” for manufacturing “all SOrts of Ironwork, rfom a Lock and Key to an Anchor of the greatest size.” Robert Luke was the grandson of John Luke of Claythorn (No. 102), and married Janet, born, 1707, second daughter of Provost John Stirling (No. 96). His eldest daughter, Isobel, was married to George Bogle, merchant in Glasgow. His burial-place is close to the north wall of the High Churchyard. (see Nos. 1127, 1129, 1135, 1137, 1151, 1153, 1154, 1156, 1159, 1169, 1253, 1267.)
Photograph, from the original painting.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
104. The Rev. JOHN HAMILTON, D.D.
Born about 1713; died, 1780.
Minister of the High  Church of Glasgow. Son of the Rev. John Hamilton, D.D., minister of the College Church (No. 106), and father of Provost John Hamilton of Northpark (No. 371). (See No. 827.)
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by T. & R. Annan & Sons.
105. JOHN ANDERSON, Elder of Dowhill.
Born, 16—; died, October, 1684.
Merchant. Provost of Glasgow in 1658 amd 1667. Son of Ninian Anderson, Deacon of the Cordiners, 1604, afterwards Deacon-Convener. He married, first, 7th January, 1634, Barbara Gilhagie (probably daughter of Ninian Gilhagie, the Elder, merchant-burgess of Glasgow), by whom he had, with other issue, Janet (born, 1635, died, 1711), wife of John Luke, Elder of Claythorn (No. 102); John (born, 1636, died, 1710) of Dowhill, Provost of Glasgow, 1689, 1690, 1695, 1696, 1699, 1700, 1703, 1704; and Ninian (born, 1639, died, 1680), Bailie, 1669, 1675, 1678, Dean of Guild, 1676, 1677. The subject of this notice married, second, 21st March, 1667, Rebecca Hamilton, who died, 1699. M’Ure mentions him as one of the earlier “sea adventurers,” and as a partner in the soap-work established in 1667. Sir John Moore (No. 226) was his descendant through Marion Anderson (daughter of his son Provost John Anderson, Younger of Dowhill), who married the Reverend Charles Moore of Stirling, the father of Dr. John Moore (No. 136).
Photograph, from the original portrait.
—∴—
Lent by the Rev. Henry M. Hamilton, D.D.
106. The Rev. JOHN HAMILTON, D.D.
Born about 1670; died, 1741.
Minister of the College Church, Glasgow. Vice-chancellor of the University, 1727. Married Margaret, daughter of William Ballantine of Castlehill, and was father of the Rev. John and grandfather of Provost John Hamilton of Northpark (No. 371). (See No. 830.)
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
107. JOHN ORR of Barrowfield, Camlachie, and Stobcross.
Born about 1685; died, 1744.
Merchant. First a Divinity student, then in trade; first poor, then rich; ut throughout upright and respected; a man of parts and letters. Bailie of Glasgow in 1719; Lord Rector of the University in 1731, in 1735, and in 1741; donor to the University of “the principall summ” of £500 sterling, “the yearly annuall rent thereof” to be employed “for the behoove of the publick Library of the said University.” It was by request of the University that Barrowfield sat for this portrait, “to be got drawn by a good hand, and placed in the Library.” He married, first, in 1714, Helen Smith, daughter of a merchant in Glasgow, by whom he had William Orr of Barrowfield, father of John Orr of Barrowfield, Town-clerk of Glasgow, 1781 to 1803; second, in 1743, Margaret Stewart of Blackhall, widow of Peter Murdoch (No. 64), and mother of Peter Murdoch (No. 172); by her, who survived him fifty years, he had no children.
PAINTER – John Williamson.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
108. The Rev. ROBERT FINDLAY, D.D.
Born, 1721; died, 1814.
Professor of Divinity in the University of Glasgow from 1783 to 1814.Dr. Findlay was author of “Two Letters to Dr. Kennicot, London, 1762,” and other works. He married Annabella, daughter of Robert Paterson of Braehead, Ayrshire, and was the father of Robert Findlay (1st) of Easterhill, Dean of Guild, 1796, and grandfather of Robert Findlay of Easterhill (No. 273).
PAINTER – Peter Paillou.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
109. The Rev. WILLIAM LEECHMAN, D.D.
Born, 1706; died, 1785.
Professor of Divinity in the University from 1744 to 1761; appointed Principal in 1761; author of various works, including a Life of Dr. Hutcheson. Married Bridget Balfour, of the Pilrig family.
Painter unknown.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
110. WILLIAM RICHARDSON of Croy Leckie.
Born at Aberfoyle, 1743; died, 1814.
Professor of Humanity in the University of Glasgow from 1778 to 1814. Son of the Rev. James Richardson, minister of Aberfoyle. Author of “Poems Chiefly Rural,” and “The Maid of Lochlin, and other Poems.”
PAINTER – John Graham Gilbert, R.S.A., after the original by Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A.

 

Domestic and Miscellaneous Articles (continued.), pp.348-349.

 

Lent by George R. Alexander.
1982. Chair. Made of oak from the roof og Glasgow Cathedral.
—∴—
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., of Daleville.
1983. Table. Said to have been used at the Communion Service by Peden when minister of New Luce, and afterwards by Renwick.
—∴—
Lent by Andw. J. Kirkpatrick.
1984. Carved Corner Arm Chair.
—∴—
Lent by James Robb.
1985. Chair. Belonged to James Laurie of Laurieston. (See Nos. 803, 804, 806, 815.)
—∴—

_20180325_062820

Lent by the Incorporation of Weavers.
1422. Original Deacon’s Box of the Incorporation.

 

Lent by “The Lodge of Glasgow” Saint John 3 bis.
1428. Masonic Chest, “God save the King, and Mason’s Craft, 1684.”

 

Lent by William Connal, Junior.
1566. Sedan Chair.

 

Lent by Andw. J. Kirkpatrick.
1698. Carved Oak Arm Chair, “B/A/MD”.

 

Lent by John Adamson of Craigadam.
1699. Carved Oak Arm Chair, “I A.”

 

Lent by William Wilson.
1707. Box, mounted in brass, with two shuttles, “1763,” and scroll.
“By unanimity small corporations grow
By Contention the great to ruin soon do go.”
Probably belonged to one of the old Weavers’ Societies.

 

Lent by the Misses Dunlop of Tolcross.
1986. Carved Oak Cabinet. Belonged to John Dunlop (1st) of Garnkirk, merchant and burgess in Glasgow (No. 53). Bears the initials and coat of arms of himself and his wife Bessie Dunlop, 24th May, 1632.
—∴—
Lent by John Denholm of The Mains.
1987. Cabinet, with painted Figures. Belonged to the Govan family. (See Nos. 459, 460, 480.)
—∴—
Lent by the Council of the Philosophical Society of Glasgow.
1988. Ballot Box. Belonged to the Dilettanti Society, 1825.
1989. Ballot Box, of the Philosophical Society, instituted 1802.
—∴—
Lent by the Governors of the Technical College, Glasgow.
1990. Spinnet. Belonged to the ate William Euing (No. 318). (See No. 1779.)
1991. Dital Harp. (See No. 1990.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Murray.
1992. Spinnet.

 

Arrangement of Cases Containing Literature., p.356.

 

     Case
               A. – Books Printed in Glasgow before 1700.
               B. – Sir William Wallace; Robert the Bruce; Sir David Lindesay; and Dougal Graham’s Account
                     of the Rebellion of 1745.
                     Books Printed in Glasgow during the First Half of the Eighteenth Century.
              C. – Books Printed in Glasgow during the Eighteenth Century.
         D, E. – The Foulis Press – 1741-1796.
              F. – Books Printed in Glasgow during the Second Half of the Eighteenth Century.
              G. – Books Printed in Glasgow during the First Half of the Nineteenth Century.
                     Books Relating to Glasgow but not Printed in it.
              H. – Books Relating to Glasgow but not Printed in it (continued).
              I. – Early Glasgow Newspapers.
              J. – Glasgow Playbills, Broadsheets, etc.
    K, L, M. – Books Relating to the History of Glasgow.
              N. – Glasgow Chap-Books, and Juvenile Books.
                     Water-Colour Drawings of Uniforms and Dresses.
    O, P, Q. – Manuscripts Connected with Glasgow.
R, S, T, U. – Glasgow Periodicals, and Serials.

 

Literature., Case A., pp.357-365.

BOOKS PRINTED IN GLASGOW BEFORE 1700.

 

PRINTER – I. W[REITTOUN]. Edinburgh.

Lent by the Trustees of the Mitchell Library.
2030. [Dickson (Rev. David).] Trve Christian Love: to bee sung with any of the Common Tunes of the Psalmes. 1634.
Printed by I. W. for John Wilson, and are to be sould at his shop in Glasgow. I. W. probably stand for John Weittoun, a printer in Edinburgh.
This is the first book with a Glasgow imprint. This copy is a fragment only.
John Wilson was a bookseller in Glasgow, and next year published “A Treatise upon Death…” by Ninian Campbell, preacher at Kilmacolme, co. Renfrew. Edinburgh: Printed by R. Y. for J. Wilson, Bookseller in Glasgow. Anno 1635.
The author of this book was the Rev. David Dickson, afterwards Professor of Divinity in the University of Glasgow. (See Nos. 2036, 2562, 2565.)
—∴—

PRINTER – GEORGE ANDERSON

_20180325_224734

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2031. The Protestation of the Generall Assemblie of the Church of Scotland. 1638.
The first piece of printing known to bear a Glasgow imprint, the previous item, No. 2030, though published in Glasgow, 1634, having probably been printed in Edinburgh. The Protestation had been published, at least twice, earlier in the year, and Anderson issued works bearing his Edinburgh imprint as late as the end of August or beginning of September, 1638. So long as the printing-press was under the control of the Magistrates no political publications were issued. (See No. 29.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2032. The Protestation of the Generall Assemblie of the Church of Scotland. 1638.
(A duplicate of No. 2031.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2033. Boyd (Zacharie). A Cleare Forme of Catechising, before the giving of the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper.
This copy is probably unique. (See Nos. 17, 2035, 2363, 2364, 2365, 2367, 2565.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2034. Row (John). Hebrææ Linguæ Institutiones compendiosissimæ & facillimæ, in Discipulorum gratiam primum concinnatæ. 1644.
The first book printed in Scotland in which Hebrew characters were used.
The author was a successful schoolmaster at Perth; then minister of Aberdeen; and in Cromwell’s time Principal of the University of Aberdeen, at that time the Universitas Carolina. He dedicated the present work to the Town Council of Aberdeen, and for this and his pains in teaching the Hebrew tongue they made him a present of 400 merks Scots. Prefixed are a number of commendatory verses by Samuel Rutherfurd, Principal Adamson, Dr. Panter, and others.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2035. Boyd (Zachary). The Garden of Zion. Wherein the life and death of godly and wicked men in Scriptures are to be seene. 2 Vols. 1644.
These volumes contain the rarest of all the author’s printed works. (See No. 2033.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2036. Dicson (Rev. David). Expositio analytica omnium Apostolicarvm Epistolarvm. 1645.
David Dickson was one of the most eminent men of his time. He was born in the Trongait in 1583. He became minister of Irvine, Professor of Divinity at Glasgow, 1640-1650, and at Edinburgh, 1650-1662. He was a man of learning and “a good Scottish expositour.” The present work appeared in English, London, 1659. (See Nos. 2030, 2562, 2565.)
—∴—

PRINTER – HEIRES OF GEORGE ANDERSON.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
PRINTER – HEIRES OF GEORGE ANDERSON.
2037. A cleare Method [of] Morning and Evening Prayer for a Familie. Together with a short Compend of the Catechisme for children of a younger age. 1648.
—∴—

PRINTER – ANDREW ANDERSON.

Lent by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
PRINTER – ANDREW ANDERSON.
2038. Rattray (Dr. Sylvester). Aditus Novus ad Occultas Sympathiæ et Antipathiæ Causas Inveniendas. 1658.
The “Aditus Novas” was reprinted at Tübingen, 1662,and is inserted i nthe “Theatrum Sympatheticum,” Nuremberg, 1662.
Sylvester Rattray practised as a physician in Glasgow, and had a high ideal of his profession. Both this work and No. 2040 are curious and interesting. In them the author seeks to establish the science of medicine upon observation instead of abstract rules. Some of the Antipathies and Sympathies which he notes are, however, startling enough, and are worthy of examination by the Folk-lore Society. The chapter of the “Aditus Novus” on the subject “Ex Fructu Arbor,” p. 51, is very interesting, and contains some curious remarks on the magnet and magnetism. He notes that if wood is thrown into Loch Neagh in Ireland it becomes stone (pp. 49, 52), and mentions the formation of stalagmites in the neighbourhood of Slaines (pp. 48, 52). Toads are produced from a putrid duck; eels from horse hairs in water; fleas from pigeons’ dung; beetles from horse droppings; bed-bugs from perspiration (p. 61). (See No. 2040.)
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS

Lent by Andw. J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS.
2039. [Davies (John).] The Civil Warres of Great Britain and Ireland containing an Exact History of their Occasion, Originall, Progress, and Happy End. 1664.
Printed by Robert Sanders. TOwns-Printer. It was originally published in London, 1661.
The author was John Davies of Kidwelly.
—∴—
Lent by the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
2040. Rattray, (Dr. Sylvester). Prognosis Medica, ad usum praxeos facili methodo digesta. 1666.
(See No. 2038.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2041. Confessio Fidei, in Conventu Theologorum Auctoritate Parliamenti Anglicani indicto elaborata. 1670.
The first Glasgow edition of the Confession was published in 1660. (See Nos. 2048, 2111, 2168.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2042. [Gregory (Prof. James).] The Great and New Art of Weighing Vanity, by M. Patrick Mather. 1672.
The author is described as “M. Patrick Mather, Arch-Bedal to the Universityof St. Andrews.” The book was really written by Professor James Gregory, then Professor of Mathematics at St. Andrews, afterwards at Edinburgh, and as a burlesque on Professor Sinclair’s “Ars nova et magna gravitatis et levitatis,” 1669. (See No. 2340.) The latter had abused William Sanders (see No. 2051), another St. Andrews Professor, and this was the cause of Gregory’s wrath; although religion and politics may have had something to do with it, Gregory being an Episcopalian and a Royalist, Sinclair a Presbyterian, with very hazy views as to the Divine Right of Kings. Professor Thomas Reid (No. 7) was a grandnephew of James Gregory. The present tract was reprinted by Baron Maseres in his “Scriptores Logarithmici.” “It is,” says Sir John Leslie, “a piece of low scurrility, and remarkable only for a very short Latin paper appended to it, containing the series first given to represent the motion of a pendulum in a circular arc.”
Sinclair prepared an answer, “Cacus dragged from his Den,” but it was never published, probably in consequence of Gregory’s death in 1675. The Manuscript is still preserved in the Univeristy Library.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2043. Bell (Thomas). Roma Restituta, sive Antiquitatum Romanorum Compendium absolutum. 1672.
The author was son of John Bell, minister of Glasgow, and was Professor of Humanity in the University of Edinburgh, 1665-1676. Although the work is devoted to Roman antiquities the writer branches off to Scotch warfare and Bannockburn. AMongst the encomiastic verses at the beginning is a set by Ninian Paterson. (See No. 2378.)
—∴—
Lent by Peter Kennedy, Telegraph Department, Post Office.
2044. Pool (Rev. Matthew). A Dialogue between a Popish Priest and an English Protestant. The Last Edition corrected and amended. 1672.
Printed by RObert Sanders, One of His Majesties Printers. Origially published at London, in 1667.
The author was the well-known comentator, and editor of the “Synopsis Criticorum.”
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2045. Burnet (Gilbert). A Vindication of the Authority Constitution, and Laws of the Church and State of Scotland. [Second Edition.] 1673.
[Printed] by Robert Sanders, Printer to the City, and University. There were two issues of this book in the same year, one with, and the other without, the Glasgow Arms on the title-page.
Gilbert Burnet was Professor of Theology from 1669-1674 The present work was considered so material a service to the government that he was offered a bishopric with a promise of the next vacant archbishopric, but he would not accept of it because he could not approve of the measures of the court, the aim of which he considered to be the advancement of popery. resigning his Glasgow professorship, he settled in London, where he became a preacher at the Rolls Chapel. He afterwards retired to Holland, returned with the Prince of Orange, and was appointed bishop of Salisbury in 1689, dying in 1715.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2046. Burnet (Alexander). The Blessedness of the Dead that die in the Lord. Preached at the Funeral of James, late Marquess of Montrose. By Alexander, Archbishop of Glasgow. 1673.
Alexander Burnet, so of the minister of Lauder, was Archbishop of Glasgow in 1664-1669 and 1674-1679. James, second Marquis of Montrose, son of the great Montrose, died in February, 1669. “He was a nobleman of great honour and probity, so great a lover of justice, and so strict in the observation of his word of promise that no man was ever nore worthy of the title of An Honest Man.”
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2047. Kirkwood (James). Grammatica Facilis, seu, Nova, & Artificiosa Methodus Docendi Linguam Latinum. 1674.
The author was born near Dunbar, became schoolmaster at Linlithgow and then at Kelso. The grammar went through four editions, having been reprinted at Edinburgh and London. He also published a Compendium of Rhetoric. He quarrelled with the magistrates of Linlithgow, was expelled from the school, took them to the Court of Session, and published “The History of the Twenty-Seven Gods of Linlithgow,” a very curious piece.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2048. The Confession of Faith, together with the Larger and Lesser Catechismes. 1675.
Printed at London for the Company of Stationers, Anno 1658,… and reprinted at Glasgow by Robert Sanders, Printer to the City and University. (See No. 2041.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2049. A New Prognostication for the year of Our Blessed Lord 1681. Being the first after Leap-year. 1681.
This volume also contains the “Prognostications” onwards to 1692. These early Glasgow Almanacs are probably unique. They are believed to be the work of James Cross [or Corss], mathematician, who had a gift of £10 Scots from the Town Council of Glasgow in 1661 for dedicating an ALmanac to the Town. He taught geometry and navigation in Edinburgh, and published some mathematical works.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2050. Rose (Alexander), D.D. A Sermon, preached before the Right Honourable The Lords Comissioners of His Majesties most Honourable Privy Counsel At Glasgow. 1684.
The occasion of the sermon was the meeting of the Commission of Justiciary at Glasgow, on 13th October, 1684. In the dedication to the Judges the Professor says the “incomparable zeal and dexterity whereby they managed the Court was incredibly to the advantage of a decayed religion and loyalty in this corner.” What they did was to imprison scores of worthy people for refusing to take the test, and to banish 200 of the smaller heritors in the Glasgow district to the Plantations. Walter Gibson,merchant in Glasgow, was the principal agent in effecting the deportation of these unfortunates.
Alexander Rose, son of the minister of Monymusk, studied divinity in Glasgow under Dr. Gilbert Burnet; became minister of Perth in 1672; professor of Divinity in Glasgow University in 1682; and principal of St. Mary’s College, St. Andrews, in 1686. He was consecrated bishop of Moray in 1687, and translated in the same year to Edinburgh, where he died in 1720.
—∴—
Lent by the University of Glasgow.
2051. Sanders (William). Elementa Geometriæ Methodo naturali clara & facili breviter demonstrata. 1686.
Probably the first book published in Glasgow which was illustrated with woodcuts. Under a separate title-page is a treatise on Logariths and Trigonometry.
The author was professor of mathematics at St. Andrews (See No. 2042.)
—∴—
J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleview, Braidwood, Carluke.
2052. The New Testament of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. 1691.
Printed [in Black-letter] by Robert Sanders, One of their Majesties printers.
In Acts iv. 3, it has “whom ye may appoint” for “whom we may appoint.” (See Nos. 2059, 2138.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2053. [Sempill of Beltrees (Sir James).] A Pick-tooth for the Pope: or the Pack-mans Pater-noster. Translated out of Dutch by S.I.S., and newly augmented and enlarged by his son R.S. 1695.
Printed by Robert Sanders, One of His Majesties printers. There was an earlier Glagow edition published in 1669.
Sir James Sempill of Beltrees was born in 1566, and died in Paisley in 1626. He married Geallis Elphingston, sister of the laird of Blythswood. (See No. 2081.)
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS [of Auldhouse].

Robert Sanders of Auldhouse (No. 71) was son of Robert Sanders the Elder, who died in 1696.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2054. [Bell, Rev. (John).] Witch-Craft Proven, Arreign’d, and Condemn’d in its Professors, Professions and Marks, excerpted forth of the most Authentick Authors… By a Lover of the Truth. 1697.
The author, Rev. John Bell, who was born at Glasgow in 1676, and died in 1707, was minister of Gladsmuir. Various MSS. on witchcraft by him were disposed of in the Constable sale. (See Sale Catalogue, Nos. 2902, 2908, 2957.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2055. A Pleasant and Excellent Dialogue Betwixt a Learned Divine and a Beggar. 1698.
London, Printed, and Re-printed at Glasgow.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2056. [Law (Jo.) P.P.] Calendarium Lunæ Perpetuum: cursus Lunæ acurate monstratus. 1699.
The author was Professor of Philosophy in the University. He was the last Regent admitted after disputation. On this occasion (2nd January, 1691) there were nine candidates who disputed in presence of the Faculty. Law was son of Robert Law, minister of East Kilpatrick; he died in 1718, leaving a legacy of books to the University Library.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2057. These Philosophicæ… ex Inclyta Academia Glasguensi, as Lauream Magisterialem Aspirantes… Publico Eruditorum Examini subjicient. Sub Praesidio Gerschomi Carmichael, P.P. V.Y. 1699-1716.
Robert Sanders styles himself One of the King’s printers, as also printer to the City and to the University.
A collection of Graduation Theses between the years 1699 and 1716. Probably unique. (See Nos. 2090, 2349, 2350.)
—∴—

PRINTER – ANDREW HEPBURN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2058. The late Proceedings and Votes of the Parliament of Scotland; contained in an Address delivered to the King… stated and vindicated. 1689.
This was issued by Robert Ferguson the Plotter, but it is doubtful whether it was printed in Glasgow. There were two editions in the same year.
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2059. The New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. 1679.
This edition is in Black-letter, and the same typographical mistakes occur in it as in the one of 1691. Mr. Francis Fry thought that this book was printed in Glasgow, and his opinion is probably correct. The same view is adopted by Loftie in “A Century of English Bibles,” p. 161. (See No. 2052.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2060. A Letter from a Citizen of Glagsow To his Friend at Edinburgh. Containing some modest Animadversions on a late Printed Letter, concerning the Affairs of that City. 1700.

 

Case B., pp.365-374.

SIR WILLIAM WALLACE.

 

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS.

Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2061. The Life and Acts of the Most Famous and Valiant Champion Sir William Wallace, Knight of Ellerslie. 1665.
Printed [in Black-letter] by Robert Sanders, Printer to the Town.
—∴—

PRINTER – ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL and ALEXANDER MILLER.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2061A. The Life and Acts of the Most Famous and Valiant Champion Sir William Wallace. 1736.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN ROBERTSON and Mrs. McLEAN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2062. The Life and Acts of… Sir William Wallace. 1747.
—∴—

PRINTER – ARCHIBALD McLEAN.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2063. The Life and Acts of… Sir William Wallace. 1756.

 

ROBERT THE BRUCE.

 

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2064. The Acts and Life of the most Victorious Conqueror Robert Bruce, King of Scotland. 1672.
Printed [in Black-letter] by Robert Sanders, Printer to the City and University.
—∴—

PRINTER – ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL and ALEXANDER MILLER.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2065. The Acts and Life of Robert Bruce, King of Scotland. 1737.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN HALL.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2066. Gordon (Patrick). The Famous History of the renown’d and valiant Prince Robert, sirnamed The Bruce, King of Scotland. 1753.
 

SIR DAVID LINDESAY.

 

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2067. Lindesay (Sir David). The Works of the Famous and Worthy Knight Sir David Lindesay of the Mount, alias, Lyon, King at Armes. 1665.
Printed in Black-letter by Robert Sanders, Printer to the Town. There was an earlier Glasgow edition in 1656, and a later one in 1672.
—∴—
Lent by James Finlayson, M.D., 2 Woodside Place.
2068. Lindsay (Sir David). The Works. 1683.
This Edition is printed in Black-letter.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2069. Lindesay (Sir David). The Works. 1696.
This Edition is printed in Black-letter.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT SANDERS [of Auldhouse].

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2070. Lindsay (Sir David). The Works. 1712.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN HALL.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2071. Lindsay (Sir David). The Works. 1754.

 

THE REBELLION.

 

PRINTER – JAMES DUNCAN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2072. Graham (Dougal). A Full, Particular, and True Account of the Rebellion In 1745-6… To which is added Several other Poems by the same Author. 1746.
“Price four pence half-penny.” This is the first edition, and the only copy known.
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2073. Graham (Dougal). A Full and Particular Account of the Rebellion: In the Years 1745 and 1746. The Second Edition greatly enlarg’d and corrected by the Author. 1752.
Printed for, and sold by Dougal Graham, Merchant in Glasgow. This is the only known copy of the second edition.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN ROBERTSON.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2074. Graham (Dougal). An Impartial History of the Rise, Progress, and Extinction of the late Rebellion in Britain, in the Years 1745 and 1746. The Third Edition with Amendments. 1774.
—∴—

PRINTER – J. & M. ROBERTSON.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2075. Graham (Dougal). An Impartial History of… the late Rebellion. Fifth Edition. 1787.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2076. Graham (Dougal). An Impartial History of… the late Rebellion. Seventh Edition. 1803.
The last three numbers have a woodcut frontispiece of the author, apparently printed from the same wood-block.

 

BOOKS PRINTED IN GLASGOW NOT LATER THAN 1742.

 

Case C., pp.374-385.

 

PRINTER – WILLIAM DUNCAN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2106. Arbuckle (James). Glotta a Poem. By Mr. Arbuckle, Student in the University of Glasgow. 1721.
This work was reprinted at Glasgow in 1791. It contains an account of Golfing on the Green.
The author, and Irishman, educated in Glasgow, became a schoolmaster in the north of Ireland. He wrote “Snuff: a Poem,” published at Glasgow in 1717, without the name of the printer, a second edition being published at Edinburgh in 1719. He projected a translation of Virgil, but did not print it. He died in 1734, aged 34. We are indebted to him for an account of the disturbance which arose in the University om 1721 over the proposal of some of the students to act Cato and Tammerlane. He was at the time a student of Divinity.
—∴—
Lent by A. W. Gray Buchanan, Parkhill, Polmont.
2107. Buchanan (William) of Auchmar. A Historical and Genealogical Essay upon the Family and Surname of Buchanan. 1723.
Reprinted at Glasgow in 1820.
The author, William Buchanan, was chief of the family of Buchanan, and hoped in his book to have demonstrated that his family was the latest in descent from that of Buchanan of that ilk. It is full of interesting information.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2108. Robe (Rev. James). A Faithful Narrative of the Extraordinary Work of the Spirit of God, at Kilsyth, and other Congregations in the Neighbourhood. 1742.
James Robe was parish minister at Kilsyth.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2109. A Short Narrative of the Extraordinary Work at Cambuslang; in a Letter to a Friend. 1742.
The revivals to which the above two tracts refer followed on the visit of George Whitefield to Glasgow, and were amongst the most striking incidents of this period. (See No. 2152).
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2110. [Crouch (Nathaniel).] The English Hero, or, Sir Francis Drake Reviv’d. Inlarged and reduced into Chapters and Contents by R. B. 1764.
The author was Nathaniel Crouch, who, under the name of Robert or Richard Burton, wrote a large number of small books for popular use during the latter part of the seventeenth and beginning of the eighteenth centuries.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES DUNCAN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2111. The Confession of Faith, Larger and Shorter Catechisms. 1727.
(See Nos. 2041, 2048, 2168.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2112. McBane (Donald). The Expert Sword-man’s Companion: or the True Art of Self-Defence. 1728.
With an engraved frontispiece (Donaldi Bani, Scoti, Effigies) and 17 other plates. They are well engraved and the figures well drawn. This copy bears the autograph of Lawrence Dinwiddie (No. 474).
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2113. Adams (Jane). Miscellany Poems. By Mrs. Jane Adams in Crawfordsdyke. 1734.
Jean Adams is the reputed author of There’s nae luck about the house. In a Note to the Reader by Archibald Crawford, he says that “she is a young woman, born in the town of Crawford’s-dyke,… her father was a shipmaster in that place,” and that she lived some years with a minister after the death of her father. John Stark, Provost of Glasgow (1726-1727), subscribed for 12 copies. The book did not sell, and the remainder was shipped to Boston, Massachusetts.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES and JOHN DUNCAN.

The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2114. Heaven upon Earth; or the History of the Transfiguration of Jesus Christ, opened… in several Sermons. 1754.
—∴—

PRINTER – A. McLEAN and J. DUNCAN, juniors.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2115. [Thom (Rev. William).] Donaldsonaid. J—n D——n detected; or an Account how the Authentic Address of the — was discovered. In a Letter from A.M., Student in Divinity. 1763.
With other tracts by the same author.
William Thom was minister of Govan, 1748-1790. He was an acute but eccentric man, and although presented to his parish by the University, he was not sparing in his strictures on the Professors and their methods of teaching. Professor Clow’s class he describes as “the drowsy shop of logic and metaphysics.” His collected works were published at Glasgow in 1799. He founded a parish library in Govan, the books being lent out on a small quarterly payment. The library still exists, but is not practically useful. John Donaldson was the College servant. (See Nos. 2253, 2629.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2116. Sinclair (Prof. George). Satan’s Invisible World discovered; or, a choice Collection of Modern Relations, proving that there are Devils, Spirits, Witches and Apparitions. 1763.
First published in 1685. (See Nos. 2340 – 2346.)
—∴—

PRINTER – A. DUNCAN and CO.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2117. Witherspoon (Rev. John), D.D. Sermons on Practical Subjects. 1768.
(See No. 2173.)

 

2118. Ovid. Decerpta ex Publii Ovidii Nasonis Metamorphoseon Libris. 1770.

 

2119. Scripture Songs: or, Translations and Paraphrases of several Passages of Sacred Scripture. A new Edition, revised and corrected. 1770.
—∴—

PRINTER – A. DUNCAN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2120. The A, B, C, With the Shorter Catechism. 1774.
(See No. 2079.)
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT CHAPMAN and A. DUNCAN.

Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke.
2121. Willison (Rev. John). A Sacramental Catechism; or, a Family Instructor for Young Communicants. 1775.
—∴—
Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace.
2122. A Chronological Index of the most Remarkable Events and Persons recorded in Ancient and Modern History. 1777.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT and THOMAS DUNCAN.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2123. Boston (Rev. Thomas). A View of the Covenant of Grace from the Sacred Records. 1770.
The author was Thomas Boston the Elder, minister of Etterick, 1707-1732. (See Nos. 2241, 2248.)

 

2124. Roman Stories: or, the History of the Seven Wise Masters of Rome. The Thirty-third Edition. 1784.
Adorned with many pretty Pictures, a lively expression of each History.
—∴—

PRINTER – J. & A. DUNCAN.

Lent by the Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2125. Doddridge (Rev. Philip), D.D. Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul. 1796.

 

2126. Owen (Rev. John), D.D. Twenty-five Discourses suitable to the Lord’s Supper. 1797.
—∴—

PRINTER – ALEXANDER MILLER.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2127. Brooks (Rev. Thomas). An Ark for all God’s Noahs in a gloomy stormy day; or the best Wine reserved till last. 1738.
Printer at Glasgow College. (See No. 2104.)

 

2128. The Whole Prophecies of Scotland, England, France, Ireland, and Denmark, Prophesied by Thomas Rymer, Marvellous Merling, Beid, Berlington, Waldhave, Eltrain, Banester, and Sibilla. 1739.
This Collection was first printer by Robert Waldegrave at Edinburgh in 1603.
—∴—

PRINTER – GLASGOW-COLLEGE.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2129. Ambrose (Rev. Isaac). War with Devils; and Ministration of, and Commvnion with Angels. Second Edition. 1738.
Printed for Archibald Ingram, John Hamilton, James Dechman, and John Glasford, Merchants in Glasgow.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT URIE and COMPANY.

Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2130. Gray (Rev. Andrew). The Mystery of Faith opened up: or some Sermons concerning Faith. 1740.
There were two earlier editions – London, 1673, 8vo.; and Edinburgh, 1697, 12mo.
The author was a Glasgow minister.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2131. Phaedrus. Phaedri Augusti Liberti Fabularum Æsopiarum Libri Quinque. 1741.
Typis Roberti Urie & Soc. Curâ & Impensis Roberti Foulis.
Apparently it did not sell, as, in 1774, thirty-three years after the date of publication, it was given as a Grammar School Prize.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2132. Terence. Publii Terentii Carthaginiensis Afri Comoediae Sex. 1742.
A Prize of the Glasgow Grammar School, 1761. A suggestion that this also was dead stock.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT URIE.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2133. [Collins (Anthony).] A Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty. The Fourth Edition Corrected. 1749.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2134. Sallust. C. Crispi Salustii Belli Catilinarii et Jugurthini Historiae. 1749.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2135. Fletcher (Andrew) of Saltoun. Political Works. 1749.

 

2136. Drummond (William) of Hawthornden. The History of Scotland, from the Year 1423, to the Year 1542. 1749.
—∴—
Lent by Robert Gray, The Wern, Mansewood, Pollokshaws.
2137. Dryden (John). Select Essays on the Belles Lettres. By Mr. Dryden. 1750.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2138. H KAINH ΔIAϴHKH. Novum Testamentum. 1750.
Printed by R. Urie for J. Barry, bookseller. This is a large paper copy, and a beautiful specimen of Greek printing. Ruddiman of Edinburgh published an edition in the same year – an editio altera. It is in double columns and the printing is inferior to this. The Glasgow edition follows Mills’ text; the Edinburgh edition, that of Wetstein. In 1759 Robert & Andrew Foulis published an edition according to Wetstein’s text, in quarto, double columns. (See No. 2052.)

 

2139. Hutcheson (Prof. Francis), LL.D. Reflections upon Laughter, and Remarks upon the Fable of the Bees. 1750.
(See Nos. 1, 2093.)
—∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2140. Colvil (Samuel). The Whigs Supplication, or, the Scotch-Hudibras. A Mock-poem. 1751.
—∴—
Lent by The Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
2141. Harvey (William), M.D. Exercitationes Anatomicae, de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis Circulatione. 1751.
The author was the discoverer of the circulation of the blood.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2142. Lucan. Marci Annaei Lucani Pharsalia, sive de Bello Civiti Libri X. 1751.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2143. Gay (John). Fables. In Two Parts. By the late Mr. Gay. 1752.
This edition has woodcuts.

 

2144. Milton (John). Paradise Lost: a Poem, in Twelve Books. 1753.
Printed by R. Urie, for John Wood, Bookseller in Edinburgh. This edition contains a portrait of Milton, engraved by Phinn. (See Nos. 2147, 2216.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2145. Montgomery (Captain Alexander). Poetical Works. 1754.
This is a large paper copy.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2146. Pope (Alexander). An Essay on Man. Carefully Corrected. 1754.
(See No. 2229.)

 

2147. Milton (John). Paradise Regain’d. A poem, in Four Books. To which is added Samson Agonistes, and Poems upon Several Occasions. A new Edition corrected. 1755.
(See No. 2144.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2148. Earl Douglas; or, Generosity Betray’d. A Tragedy. 1764.
Printed by R. Urie for the Author.
By John Wilson, author of “Clyde, a Poem,” printed by Robert Urie in the same year. In 1767 he was appointed by the Magistrates of Greenock Master of the Grammar School of that town, but upon condition that he should abandon “the profane and unprofitable art of poem-making.”
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT SMITH and ALEXANDER HUTCHESON.

Lent by the Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2149. Guthrie (Rev. William). The Christian’s Great Interest. 1743.
This is one of the most popular religious works ever published in Scotland, having gone through many editions, and having been translated into French, German, and Dutch. The author published it in self defence, some imperfect notes of his sermons having been printed by one of his hearers. William Guthrie, born, 1620, died, 1665, was minister of Fenwick until removed by Archbishop Burnet. He was a man of commanding presence, with a rich sonorous voice. An emotional nature, strong religious feeling, and great natural eloquence made him one of the most popular preachers of the day. Robert Wodrow was his great grandson. He was healthy in body as in mind, fond of field sports, and a keen curler.

 

2150. Vincent (Rev. Thomas). Christ’s Certain and Sudden Appearance to Judgment. 1745.
Printed by Robert Smith and Alexander Hutcheson in Company. There was an earlier Glasgow edition printed by John Robertson and Mrs. McLean in Company, 1739.
The author was minister of Maudline, Milk Street, London.
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2151. A Cloud of Witnesses, for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ: or the Last Speeches and Testimonies of those who have suffered for the Truth in Scotland since the year 1680. The Fourth Edition, Corrected and Enlarged. 1741.
Printed for and sold by Robert Smith. The first edition was published in 1714. This fourth edition gives for the first time the Testimonies of John Nisbet the Younger, John Nisbet of Hardhill, and others.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2152. Waddell (Andrew). Satan’s Ape detected: or some Observations on a Scandalous Pamphlet against Mr. Whitefield… to disparage the Work at Cambuslang, &c. 1742.
Printed for R. Smith.
The author was a soldier in Dunbarton Castle. (See Nos. 2108, 2109.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2153. A full collection of All the Proclamations and Orders, published by the Authority of Charles, Prince of Wales, since his Arrival in Edinburgh, the 17th Day of September till the 15th of October, 1745. 1745, 1746.
This volume contains two parts, published in two successive years. It is one of the scarcest books relative to the Jacobite Rising of 1745. The Jacobites took a printing-press from Glasgow, and with it they printed at Bannockburn an account of Falkirk Fight. (See Nos. 2166, 2379, 2602, 2616-2626.)

 

2154. [Gillies (Rev. John).] An Exhortation to the Inhabitants of the South Parish of Glasgow and the Hearers in the College Kirk. 1750.
Printed for John Orr. This was a periodical publication, and the first number is dated September 26th, 1750. (See No. 2641.)
The author was minister of the College Church.
—∴—

PRINTER – ALEXANDER TILLOCH & CO.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2155. Gessner (Solomon). The Death of Abel. In Five Books. Attempted from the German of Mr. Gessner. The Eighth Edition. 1784.
This is Mrs. Mary Collyer’s translation, which first appeared in 1761, and an eleventh edition in 1776. A new translation was published in 1780.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN McCALLUM.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2156. Wellwood (James), M.D. Memoirs of the Most Material Transactions in England, for the last Hundred Years, preceding the Revolution in 1688. A New Edition Corrected. 1749.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2157. The pleasant art of Money Catching. The Fifth Edition, Corrected and much Enlarged. 1750.
There was an earlier Glasgow edition, printed by James Duncan in 1740.
—∴—

PRINTER – WILLIAM MITCHELL & JAMES KNOX.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2158. The History of Charles XII. King of Sweden. In Eight Books. 1750.
This volume has a portrait of Charles XII. – a poor woodcut, little better than those in a chap-book.
—∴—

PRINTER – WILLIAM SMITH.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2159. The Fashionable Preacher: an Essay. 1773.
This volume contains other Glasgow Tracts, dated from 1759 to 1782.

 

2160. Observations and Remarks on the Collier Law (as it is commonly called), tending to show, That Colliers are not Slaves. 1773.
This volume contains other Tracts on Slavery in Scotland.
—∴—

PRINTER – ARCHIBALD McLEAN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2161. Hill (J.) The Young Secretary’s Guide: or, a Speedy Help to learning. The Sixth and Twentieth Edition. 1752.
—∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2162. The Life and Acts of… Sir William Wallace. 1756.
(This is a duplicate of No. 2063.)
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN HALL.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2163. Bunyan (John). The Pilgrim’s Progress, from this World to that which is to Come. The Twentieth and First Edition. 1754.
(See No. 2103.)
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by John Wordie, 42 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2164. The Spectator. In Eight Volumes. 1750.
Printed for A. Stalker and R. Urie.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2165. The Scots Chronicles: Or, A New History of Scotland. 1755.
Printed for W. Marshall.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2166. The Wanderer: or Surprizing Escape. A Narrative founded on true Facts. 1752.
This work has reference to the escape of Prince Charles Edward, and contains remarks upon “Ascanius.” (See No. 2153.)

 

2167. Moore (Thomas). The Psalm-singer’s Delightful Pocket Companion. [No date] [1756].
Printed for the author.
To promote the improvement of church music, the Magistrates opened a free school, under the charge of Moore, at which the inhabitants of Glasgow were taught free, “on their producing proper certificates of their character from the ministers and elders of the parish where they resided.”

 

2168. The Confession of Faith. Larger and Shorter Catechisms… translated into the Irish Language by the Synod of Argyle. 1756.
Printed for John Orr. (See No. 2041.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2169. Ramsay (Allan). The Gentle Shepherd: A Scots Pastoral Comedy. 1758.
Printed for John Robertson, junior. (See Nos. 2230, 2234, 2239, 2256.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2170. A New and Correct History of New Holland, with a Description of that Part of it, called Botany Bay. 1796.
Printed for James Duncan, junior.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2171. Carmina Quadragesimalia, ab AEdis Christi Oxon. Alumnis composita. Two Volumes [in one.] 1757.
Composed by students of Christ Church, Oxford, and first published there, 1723-1748. The present edition bears a dedication “Juventuti Academiæ Glasguensi.”
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN BRYCE and DAVID PATERSON.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2172. An Address to the Members of the Associate Congregation of M—t. Concerning the Practice of Dancing, which so much prevails amongst them, particularly at Marriages. 1755.

 

2173. Witherspoon (Rev. John). A serious Enquiry into the Nature and Effects of the Stage. 1757.
John Witherspoon was minister first at Beith and then at Paisley. In 1768 he left this country for New Jersey, where he was appointed President of Princeton College, and he died there in 1796. He took an active part in the American War of Independence, sat in the Convention at Philadelphia, and accompanied Washington’s army to the field. His “Ecclesiastical Characteristics” is said “to be, perhaps, the most humorous satire ever written on a subject which apparently did not admit of it.” (See No. 2117.)

 

Case D., pp.386-389.

THE FOULIS PRESS.

 

_20180325_230624

PRINTER – ROBERT FOULIS.

Lent by the University of Glasgow.
2174. Cicero. M. Tullii Ciceronis De Natura Deorum Libri Tres. 1741.
Robert Foulis began printing in 1741, so that this volume is one of his earliest issues.
2175. Ramsay (The Chevalier). A Plan of Education. The Third Edition. 1741.
Printed for Robert Foulis, within the College; and sold by Messrs Hamilton and Balfour in Edinburgh.
The Messrs. Foulis met the author of this work in Paris.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2176. Hale (Sir Matthew). Some Thoughts on the Nature of True Religion. 1742.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2177. Argyle (Archibald, Marquis of). Instructions to a Son, Containing Rules of Conduct in publick and private Life. Written in… 1660, during his confinement. 1743.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2178. More (Sir Thomas). Utopia: or the Happy Republic. 1743.
With a portrait of the author, after Holbein. 
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2179. Demetrius Phalereus. ΔHMHTPIOΥ ΦAΛEPEΩΣ πϵρì EPMHNEIAΣ. Demetrii Phalerei de Elocutione. 1743.
The first Greek book printed in Glasgow. It was published on 4th April, 1743, as appears by an advertisement in the Glasgow Journal of that date. (See No. 2180.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2180. Demetrius Phalereus. 1743.
A large paper copy of No. 2179.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2181. Horace. Quintus Horatius Flaccus… diligenter emendatus. 1744. 
A large paper copy of the so-called immaculate Horace. The proof-sheets were hung up in the Quadrangle of the College, and a reward was offered to anyone who should discover a misprint. No claims were, however, made. Some one lost a chance of making a little money, as six errors, at least, have since been pointed out.
2182. Aeschylus. AI TOΥ AIΣXΥΛOΥ TPAΓΩΔIAI ΣΩΣOMENAI EΠTA. Tragœdiæ quae extant septem. 1746.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D,. Moorepark, Cardross.
2183. Poems in the Scottish Dialect by several Celebrated Poets. 1748.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT and ANDREW FOULIS.

Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2184. Homer. ‘H TOY ‘OMHPOY IΛIΛΣ. Ilias. 1747.
In 1747, Robert Foulis assumed his brother Andrew as partner. (See No. 2199.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2185. Hamilton (William) of Bangour. Poems on Several Occasions. 1748.
This edition was printed anonymously while the author was abroad. The preface was written by Dr. Adam Smith. (See Nos. 2186, 2376.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2186. Hamilton (William) of Bangour. Poems on Several Occasions. 1749.
This is an exact reprint of No. 2185. Some copies contain an engraved head of the author from Gavin Hamilton’s portrait.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2187. Lucretius. Titi Lucretii Cari De Rerum Natura libri sex. 1749.

 

 2188. Cicero. M. Tullii Ciceronis Opera quae supersunt omnia… Voluminibus xx. 1749.

 

2189. Baxter (Rev. Richard). Gairm an de mhoir do ‘n t sluagh neimh-iompoichte, iompochadh agus bith beo. Glassacha, 1750.
—∴—
Lent by J. Guthrie Smith, Mugdock, Milngavie.
2190. Cæsar. Caii Julii Caesario et A. Hirtii De Rebus a Caesare gestis Commentarii. 1750.
This is a large paper copy of No. 2191.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2191. Cæsar. C. Julii et A. Hirtii De Rebus a Cæsare gestis Commentarii. 1750.
 
2192. Anacreon, Sappho and Alcaeus. Odes and Fragments. AI TOY ANAKPEONTOΣ ΩΔAI, καì τà τηs ΣAΠΦOYΣ, καì τà τoû AΛKAIOY ΛEIΨANA. 1751.
 —∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2193. Scougal (Henry). Discourses on Important Subjects. 1751.
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2194. Pindar. Pindari Opera. TA TOY ΠINΔAPOY OΛYMΠIA. 1754.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2195. Callimachus. OI TOY KAΛΛIMAXOY YMNOI. 1755.
With plates drawn and engraved in the Foulis Academy of the Fine Arts. For the printing of this book the Foulis Brothers gained a prize. (See Nos. 2203, 2207, 2224.)
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2196. Callimachus. 1755.
(A duplicate of No. 2195.)
—∴—
Lent by William Macmath, 16 St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh.
2197. Gill Morice, and Ancient Scottish Poem. Second Edition. 1755.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2198. Gill Morice, and Ancient Scottish Poem. 1755.
(A duplicate of 2197.)
2199. Homer. THΣ TOY OMHPOY IΛIAΔOΣ O TOMOΣ ΠPOTEPOΣ. The Iliad. 1756.
This is one of the finest specimens of Greek printing ever executed. The type for all the best work of Urie and the Foulises was made in Camlachie by Dr. Alexander Wilson. (See No. 2184.)
2200. Boileau-Despreaux (Nicolas). Oeuvres. 1759.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2201. A Prayer composed by Prince Eugene, and diffused among the Officers of the Army in Flanders, during the successful Wars in the Reign of Queen Anne. 1760.
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2202. Nepos (Cornelius). Cornelii Nepotis Excellentium Imperatorum Vitae. 1761.

 

2203. Guarini. Il Pastor Fido. Tragicommedia Pastorale. 1763.
This edition has Illustrations drawn and engraved in the Foulis Academy of the Fine Arts. (See No. 2195.)
—∴—
Lent by Rev. J. W. Ritchie, 58 Millbrae Road, Langside.
2204. Epictetus. TA TOY EΠIKTHTOY EΓXEIPIΔION. 1765.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2205. Catalogue of the valuable Library of the Reverend Mr. Alexander CAmpbell,… To be sold by auction at R. and A. Foulis’s Auction-Room in the Old Coffee-House, on Monday the 4th of March, 1765, at 7 o’clock at Night. 1765.
The Messrs. Foulis had weekly auctions of books, presided over by Andrew Foulis, and this is one of their Sale Catalogues. The library belonged to Alexander CAmpbell, minister of Inverary, and shows that he was a man of learning and culture.

 

2206. Buchanan (George). Paraphrasis Psalmorum Davidis Poetica. 1765.
(See Nos. 2280, 2288.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2207. The Gallery of Raphael called his Bible. 1770.
These Engravings were executed in the Foulis Academy of the Fine Arts. (See No. 2203.)

 

Case E., pp.390-392.

THE FOULIS PRESS. – continued. 

 

PRINTER – ROBERT & ANDREW FOULIS.

Lent by Donald McCorquodale, 16 Hope Street.
2208. Bell (John) of Antermony. Travels from St. Petersburg in Russia to diverse Parts of Asia. In Two Volumes. 1763.
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2209. Moor (James), LL.D. Elementa Linguae Graecae. 1766.
The author was James Moor the celebrated Grecian, born at Glasgow in 1712; died there in 1779. He was Professor of Greek in the University, 1746-1774. His Greek Grammar, first published in 1755, went through a great number of editions. Robert Foulis, the printer, married Dr. Moor’s sister. (See No. 2210.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2210. Moor (James), LL.D. An Introductory Essay on the Praepositions of the Greek language. 1766.
One of the rarer productions of the Foulis press. (See No. 2209.) 

 

 2211. Worcester (Marquis of). A Century of the Names and Scantlings of such Inventions, as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected. 1767.
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2212. Gray (Thomas). Poems by Mr. Gray. 1768.
The first work printed by the Foulises in the large type cast by Dr. Wilson, (See Nos. 2199 (note), 2221, 2291.) 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2213. The Death of Artho and the death of Fraoch. Two Ancient Poems, Translated from the Galic. 1769.
 
2214. Memorables of the Montgomeries, A Narrative in Rhyme… Printed from the only Copy known to remain. 1770.
—∴— 
Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick.
2215. Waller (Edmund). Poems on several Occasions. 1770.
 
2216. Milton (John). Paradise Lost. 1770.
This is a large paper copy. (See No. 2144.) 
—∴— 
Lent by Donald McCorquodale, 16 Hope Street.
2217. Collins (William). Poetical Works. 1770.
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2218. [Manuscript Invoice of a Parcel of Books by R. & A. Foulis. 1771]
(See Nos. 2205, 2219.) 
 
2219. A Catalogue of Books of various Ages, Languages, and Sciences. To which is subjoined a Catalogue of Manuscripts in the Greek, Latin, Oriental, and other Languages. 1771.
The Messrs. Foulis were booksellers as well as publishers. This is the Sale Catalogue of their stock of imported books and manuscripts. (See Nos. 2205, 2218.) 
 
2220. Wight (William), D.DD. Heads of a Course of Lectures on Civil History, with a Chronological Table. 1772.
Professor Wight was Professor of Ecclesiastical History in Glasgow, 1762-1778. His commission required him to lecture on Civil as well as Ecclesiastical History. His course on Civil History was very full. His successor, Dr. Hugh Macleod, likewise lectured on Civil History. 
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2221. Gray (Thomas). Poems. 1773.
(See No. 2212.) 
—∴— 
Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace.
2222. Foulis (Robert). Catalogue of Pictures. In Three Volumes. London, 1776.
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2223. Virgil. Publii Virgilii Maronis Bucolica, Georgica, et Aeneis. 1778.
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2224. A Catalogue of Pictures, Drawings, Prints, Statues and Busts in Plaister of Paris, done at the Academy in the University of Glasgow. [No date.]
This is the Catalogue issued by Robert Foulis, engraver. The engraved title-page of this work was executed in the Foulis Academy. (See Nos. 2195, 2203, 2207.) 
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2225. Sophocles. ‘𝚶 𝚻𝚶𝚼 𝚺𝚶𝚽𝚶𝚱𝚲𝚬𝚶𝚼𝚺 𝚶’𝚰𝚫𝚰𝚷𝚶𝚼𝚺 𝚻𝚼𝚸𝚨𝚴𝚴𝚶𝚺, Oedipus Tyrannus. 1777.
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2226. Catalogue of Books, being the Entire Stock, in Quires, of the late Messieurs Robert and Andrew Foulis,… intended to be sold in Wholesale by Private Bargain. 1777.
The Catalogue was used by Mr. W. J. Duncan in the preparation of his “Literary History of Glasgow.” (See Nos. 2205, 2218, 2219, 2477.) 
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2227. Virgil. Publii Virgilii Maronis Bucolica, Georgica, et Aeneis. 1784.
 
2228. Euripides. ‘𝚮 𝚻𝚶𝚼 𝚬𝚼𝚸𝚰𝚷𝚰𝚫𝚶𝚼 𝚳𝚮𝚫𝚬𝚰𝚨. Euripidis Medea. 1784.
 
2229. Pope (Alexander). Poetical Works. In Three Volumes. 1785.
(See No. 2146.) 
 
2230. Ramsay (Allan). The Gentle Shepherd. 1788.
With Illustrations by David Allan. (See Nos. 2169, 2234, 2239, 2256.) 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2231. Moor (James), LL.D. Elementa Linguae Graecae. 1793.
(See Nos. 2209, 2210, 2232.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2232. Moor (James), LL.D. On the End of Tragedy, according to Aristotle. 1794.
—∴— 
Lent by The University of Glasgow.
2233. Æschylus. 𝚨𝚰 𝚻𝚶𝚼 𝚨𝚰𝚺𝚾𝚼𝚲𝚶𝚼 𝚻𝚸𝚨𝚪𝛀𝚫𝚰𝚨𝚰 𝚬𝚷𝚻𝚨. The Tragedies. 1795.
 
2234. Ramsay (Allan). The Gentle Shepherd. A Pastoral Comedy. 1796.
(See No. 2230.)

 

Case F., pp.393-400.

BOOKS PRINTED IN GLASGOW IN THE SECOND HALF OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

 

PRINTER – JOHN BRYCE and DAVID PATERSON.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2235. Mercer (John). An Exact Abridgement of all the Public Acts of Assembly of Virginia. 1759.
Glasgow had intimate commercial relations with Virginia for many years. A “Virginia Don” was the synonym for a Glasgow commercial aristocrat whose wealth was measured not by his acres but by his tobacco hogsheads. 
—∴— 
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2236. Calvin (John). The Institution of the Christian Religion: In Four Books. 1762.
2237. Bunyan (John). The Visions… giving an Account of the Glories of Heaven and the Terrors of Hell, and of the World to come. 1762.
(See No. 2103.) 
 
2238. Hale (Matthew), Knt. Contemplations, Moral and Divine. In Two Volumes. 1763.
—∴— 

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2239. Ramsay (Allan). The Gentle Shepherd: A Scots Pastoral Comedy. 1758.
Printed for John Robertson, Junior. (See No. 2234.) 
2240. Papers in the Process William Fleming,… against the Magistrates and Town Council of Glasgow, relative to the Removal of his Saw Mill on the Molendinar Burn. 1764.
Contains the first known plan of part of Glasgow. (See No. 948.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – PATRICK MAIR.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2241. Boston (Rev. Thomas). The Sovereignty and Wisdom of God, displayed in the Afflictions of Men,… Being the substance of several Sermons. 1764.
Originally published at Edinburgh in 1737. 
The author was Thomas Boston the elder. (See Nos. 2123, 2248.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – WILLIAM BELL.

Lent by The Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
2242. Celsus (A. Cornelius). De Re Medica. In Two Volumes. 1766.
Edited by Andrew Morris, M.D., Glasgow, who reduced the art of living to the point that one straw per day sufficed for his horse and a single raisin for himself, with the result that he was seized with paralysis and became a pensioner of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons for more than thirty years. 
—∴— 
Lent by Miss Black, Shalloch Cottage, Girvan.
2243. A new Collection in Prose and Verse, for the Use of English Schools. 1780.
—∴—

PRINTER – WILLIAM SMITH.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2244. Shirra (Robert). Fellowship with the Blessed Trinity: A Sermon. 1767.
 
2245. Bennet (Benjamin). The Christian Oratory: or, the Devotion of the Closet displayed. In Two Volumes. 1776.
 
2246. Mead (Matthew). The Almost Christian Discovered. Twenty-fourth edition. 1792.
—∴— 

PRINTER – W. BELL and W. GILMOUR.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2247. Adventures of Neoptolemus, the Son of Achilles. Translated from the… French by John Bell. 1768.
 
2248. Boston (Rev. Thomas). Select Discourses on a Variety of Practical Subjects. 1768.
This is Thomas Boston the second, born in 1713, died in 1767, minister, first, of Etterick, and then of Oxnam. In 1757 he left the Church of Scotland, and, with Mr. Gillespie of Carnock, constituted the Presbytery of Relief. He was the son of Thomas Boston, the well-known “Marrow-man,” author of “The Fourfold State” and “The Crook in the Lot.” (See Nos. 2123, 2241.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – WILLIAM WALKER and JAMES DUNCAN.

Lent by Robert Guy, The Wern, Mansewood, Pollokshaws
2249.  The Synod of Jerusalem Considered. 1768.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN ROBERTSON.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2250. Defoe (Daniel). The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. 1768.
(See Nos. 2261, 2293.) 
2251. The Shorter Catechism of the Reverend Assembly of Divines, with the Proofs. 1769.
(See Nos. 2079, 2120, 2252, 2262, 2273.) 
 
2252. The A, B, C, with the Shorter Catechism, appointed by the General Assembly. 1770.
This edition has the Glasgow Arms on the title-page. (See No. 2251.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2253. Thom (William). The Happiness of Dead Clergymen, provided they die in the Lord. 1769.
(See No. 2115, 2629.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – ARCHIBALD McLEAN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2254.  Burn (John). A Practical Grammar of the English Language. 1766.
The author was a teacher of English, and father of John Burns, D.D., minister of the Barony Parish, who altered the spelling of the family name. (See Nos. 2259, 2275.) 
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen
2255. The Martyrs and Wrestlers: their Testimonies and Declarations in Rutherglen, Sanquhar, and Lanark. 1770.
—∴— 
Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick. 
2256. Ramsay, Allan. Poems. 1770.
Printed for Peter Tait. This edition has a portrait of the author. (See No. 2169.) 
—∴— 
Lent by James Finlayson, M.D., 2 Woodside Place. 
2257. Bunyan (John). The Pilgrim’s Progress… Part Second. 1770.
Printed for John Gilmour & Son. (See No. 2103.) 
—∴— 
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke. 
2258. Cocker (Edward). Arithmetic… Revised and corrected by John Mair. 1771.
Printed for James Brown. The 53rd edition of this work was published in Glasgow by John Hall in 1749. 
—∴—

PRINTER – DANIEL REID.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. 
2259. Burn (John). Practical Grammar of the English Language. The Second Edition. 1772.
(See No. 2254.) 
 
2260. Ross (William). The French Scholar’s Guide. 1772.
—∴— 

PRINTER – JOHN & JAMES ROBERTSON.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2261. Defoe (Daniel). The Life and most surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. 1774.
(See No. 2250.) 
—∴— 
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke. 
2262. Vincent (Thomas). An Explicatory Catechism; or an Explanation of the Assembly’s Shorter Catechism. 1777.
(See No. 2252.) 
—∴— 
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2263. Bunyan (John). The Pilgrim’s Progress. 1779.
(See No. 2257.) 
2264. A History of the Feuds and Conflicts among the Clans, to which is added, Songs in the Gallic Language. 1780.
An edition of this work was previously published by the Foulises in 1764. 
—∴— 

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by William Young, R.S.W., 65 West Regent Street. 
2265. Art’s Treasury of Rarities. The Sixth Edition. 1773.
Printed for John Tait. 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2266. Memorial of the Printers and Booksellers of Glasgow, addressed to the House of Commons. 1774.
—∴— 
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke.
2267. Goldie (John). Essays on various important subjects, Moral and Divine. 1779.
John Goldie, 1717-1809, mechanic, publican, astronomer, and essayist, was a friend of Burns. 
“O Goudie, terror of the Whigs, 
Dread of black coats, and reverend wigs.” 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2268. Memorial of the Lord Provost, Magistrates, and Merchants of the City of Glasgow on the Sugar Duties. 1780.
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN BRYCE.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2269. Borland (Rev. Francis). The History of Darien. 1779.
(See No. 2087.) 
—∴— 
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke. 
2270. Shields (Michael). Faithful Contendings Displayed, being an Historical Relation of the State and Actings of the Suffering Remnant of the Church of Scotland. 1780.
Edited by John Howie of Lochgoin. 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2271. The Speech of Lord Belhaven in the Scotch Parliament, at the making of the Union. 1780.
This is the famous speech of John, second Lord Belhaven, delivered on 2nd November, 1706, against the Union, which was sold by thousands at the time and went through a great number of editions, with the result that it figures on many a bookstall and is common in catalogues of old books. It was ridiculed in a poem called “The Vision,” in allusion to Lord Marchmont’s reply, “Behold he dreamed; but lo! when he awoke, behold it was a dream.” 
—∴—

PRINTER – J. & M. ROBERTSON.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2272. The Goldfinch; or, New Modern Songster. [1782].
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2273. The A, B, C, with the Shorter Catechism. 1784.
(See No. 2252.) 
—∴— 
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke. 
2274. L. (W.) The Father’s Catechism, in a Legacy to his eight children. 1796.
This book was originally published at Glasgow in 1729. The author was Robert Lang. 
—∴—

PRINTER – ALEXANDER ADAM.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2275. Burn (John). A practical Grammar of the English language. Fourth Edition. 1786.
(See Nos. 2254, 2259.) 
—∴— 
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2276. Æsop’s Fables. Adorned with New Cuts. 1790.
(See No. 2305.) 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2277. Houston (Allan). A Collection of Psalm Tunes. 1799.
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by John Wordie, 42 Montgomerie Drive. Kelvinside. 
2278. Pennicuik (Alexander). A Collection of Scots Poems. 1787.
—∴—

PRINTER – J. MENNONS.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2279. Hall (John). Britannia’s Gratitude for Royal Restoration. An Ode. 1789.
The author was a successful teacher in Glasgow. 
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES GILLIES.

Lent by John Wordie, 42 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2280. Buchanan (George). Paraphrasis Psalmorum Davidis Poetica. 1790.
(See No. 2288.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – DAVID NIVEN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2281. Regulations of the Society for the Relief of Industrious Strangers in Distress. 1791.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES TURNER.

Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. 
2282. Shepard (Rev. Mr.). Meditations and Spiritual Exercises. 1791.
—∴—

PRINTER – BRASH & REID.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2283. Dunn (Rev. William), A.M. A Sermon preached at the Opening of the Synod of Glasgow and Air, at Glasgow, 9th October, 1792. 1792.
2284. The Life of James McKaen. Third Edition. 1797.
James McKean, a shoemaker in Glasgow, was executed at the Cross on 25th January, 1797, for the murder of the Lanark carrier. 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2285. Poetry. Original and Selected. In Four Volumes. [No date, about 1798.]
This is a little periodical issued in Glasgow about the end of last century by Brash & Reid. It contains a number of pieces by Robert Burns. 
—∴—

PRINTER – W. MILLER.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2286. Stele (James). An Essay on Manufacturing Milk into Butter and Cheese; and on Calf-feeding, &c. 1794.
—∴—

PRINTER – W. PATON.

Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street. 
2287.  Locke (John). Two Treatises of Government. 1796.
—∴— 

PRINTER – JAMES MUNDELL.

Lent by William Young, R.S.W., 65 West Regent Street. 
2288. Buchanan (George). Paraphrasis Psalmorum Davidis Poetica. 1797.
(See No. 2206.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – A. CARRICK.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2289. A Commercial Guide for the Inhabitants of Glasgow. 1798.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES IMRAY.

Lent by E. Lawson, Swinlees, Dalry. 
2290. The Psalms of David. 1798.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT CHAPMAN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2291. Gray (Thomas). Poetical Works. 1798.
(See Nos. 2212, 2221.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – CHAPMAN & LANG.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2292. A Catalogue of Books on Sale by John Murdoch. 1799.
(See No. 2645.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – JOSEPH GALBRAITH.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2293. The Wonderful Life and most surprising Adventures of that renowned Heroe, Robinson Crusoe. 1798.
(See Nos. 2250, 2261.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – FALCONER & WILLISON.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2294. Ferguson (David). A Collection of Scotch Proverbs. 1799.
The first edition of this collection was published at Edinburgh in 1641. 
The editor was minister of Dunfermline, 1560-1598. 
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2295. The History of Reynard the Fox. 1798.
—∴— 
Lent by John Wordie, 42 Mongomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2296. A Collection of Scots Proverbs. 1799.
(See No. 2294.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES MUNDELL.

Lent by John Adamson, Craigadam, Kirkcudbrightshire. 
2297. Park (Alexander), Senior. Abstract of an Act for Establishing and Regulating the Police of the City of Glasgow, and other purposes. 1800.

 

Case G., pp.400-409.

BOOKS PRINTED IN GLASGOW DURING THE FIRST HALF OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

 

PRINTER – CHAPMAN & LANG.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2298. The Poetical Miscellany, containing Posthumous Poems, Songs, Epitaphs, and Epigrams, by Robert Burns. 1800.
(See Nos. 2285, 2299, 2301, 2302.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blaritum Park, Rutherglen. 
2299. Burns (Robert). Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, to which are added several other pieces not contained in any former edition of his poems. 1801.
Printed and sold by Chapman & Lang. (See No. 2298.) 
—∴— 
Lent by James Brown Fleming, Beaconsfield, Kelvinside. 
2300. Gerrond (John). Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect.
—∴—

PRINTER – THOMAS DUNCAN.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2301. Burns (Robert). Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. A New Edition, considerably enlarged. 1801.
(See No. 2299.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – NIVEN, NAPIER & KHULL.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum, Rutherglen. 
2302. Stewart’s Edition of Burns’s Poems, including a number of original pieces never before published. To which is added, an Appendix, consisting of his correspondence with Clarinda, etc. 1802.
The appendix, which has a separate title and pagination, was suppressed immediately after publication. It sometimes occurs alone. (See Nos. 2298, 2299, 2301.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – J. HEDDERWICK & CO.

Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace. 
2303. A Selection of Short Poetical Pieces, by William Angus, M.A. 1809.
The editor was a well-known and highly-respected teacher in Glasgow early in the century. (See No. 2328.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – D. NIVEN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2304. The Glasgow Miscellany, a Select Collection of Scots and English Songs. N.D.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES GILLIES.

Lent by John Oswald Mitchell, LL.D., 7 Huntly Gardens. 
2305. Æsop’s Fables. 1803.
(See No. 2276.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – THOMAS DUNCAN.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2306. Correspondence relative to the Conduct of Laurence Craigie. 1805.
Laurence Craigie was collector of taxes for the burgh of Glasgow. 
—∴—

PRINTER – WILLIAM REID & CO.

Lent by Robert Guy, The Wern, Mansewood, Pollokshaws. 
2307. MacGill (Rev. Stevenson), D.D. The Spirit of the Times. 1792.
The author was minister of Eastwood, afterwards of the Tron Church, Glasgow, and then Professor of Divinity in the University. 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2308. Instructions to the Officers of the First Battalion of Glasgow Volunteers. 1803.
(See Nos. 2000.) 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2309. Catalogue of Valuable Paintings in oil, now exhibiting in the Assembly Rooms, Ingram Street. 1813.
—∴—

PRINTER – W. LANG.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2310. A Statement of the Proceedings of the Presbytery of Glasgow relative to the use of an Organ in St. Andrew’s Church in the Public Worship of God, on the 23d August, 1807. 1808.
(See No. 407.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – EBENEZER MILLER.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2311. Chronicles of Commercia, a great trading City in the Kingdom of Bragaria. 1816.
—∴—

PRINTER – ROBERT CHAPMAN.

Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2312. Glen (William). Poems, chiefly Lyrical. 1815.
(See No. 2600.) 
—∴—

PRINTER UNKNOWN.

Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street. 
2313. Duncan (James). The Scotch Itinerary, containing the Roads through Scotland, on a new plan. 1805.
(See No. 2317.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2314. [Atkinson (Thomas).] Three Nights in Perthshire. 1821.
This copy is printed on pink paper. The author, Thomas Atkinson, describes a visit to Aberfoyle and Loch Ard in 1820, with David Robertson, afterwards his partner. (See Nos. 246, 272, 354, 2389.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – J. CAMERON.

Lent by George R. Alexander, 42 Sardinia Terrace, Hillhead. 
2315. Persecution and Oppression against John Henry Alexander of the Caledonian Theatres of Glasgow and Edinburgh. 1828.
(See Nos. 319, 325, 415.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – CONCORD OFFICE.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2316. Dialogue between Nelson’s Monument and Rutherglen Steeple, supposed to have taken place on the day of the Rutherglen Meeting for Radical Reform. 1812.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES LUMSDEN & SON.

Lent by Kenneth McLean, 19 Renfrew Street. 
2317. Duncan’s Itinerary of Scotland. 1827.
Has engraved maps. (See No. 2313.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – EDWARD KHULL.

Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick. 
2318. Addresses to the Pupils of the Glasgow Grammar School. 1828-1833.
—∴—

PRINTER – STANHOPE PRESS. ROBERT CHAPMAN.

Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead. 
2319. The Glasgow Homer, yclept Blind Alick. 1830.
(See Nos. 352, 368.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES HEDDERWICK & SON.

Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus. 
2320. The Laird of Logan, or Wit of the West. [First Series.] 1835.
This series was edited by John D. Carrick, and was largely contributed to by David Robertson, the publisher. (See Nos. 2321, 2332, 2591.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – HEDDERWICK & SON.

Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus. 
2321. The Laird of Logan. Second Series. 1837.
Mr. Robertson, the publisher, edited this series, and subsequent enlarged editions of the complete collection. (See No. 2320.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2322. McPhun’s Guide through Glasgow. [First Edition.] 1833.
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2323. McPhun’s Guide through Glasgow. [Second Edition.] 1834.
(See Nos. 2322, 2331.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – EDWARD KHULL.

Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns. 
2324. The Merchant and Banker’s Commercial Pocket Guide. 1835.
—∴—

PRINTER – JAMES HEDDERWICK.

Lent by The Directors of Stirling’s Library. 
2325. Hopkirk (Thomas), Younger of Dalbeth. Flora Anomoia. 1817.
This volume, amongst numerous well-engraved plates, contains early specimens of “nature printing,” shewing impressions from leaves of the Beech. 
—∴—

PRINTER – JOHN GRAHAM & CO.

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2326. The Trial of James Wilson convicted of High Treason. 1823.
The “High Treason” was the unfortunate emeute at Bonnymuir, for his part in which James Wilson, a Strathaven weaver, was hanged and afterwards beheaded, at Glasgow, on 30th August, 1820. (See Nos. 1601, 1601A.) 
—∴—

PRINTER – FREE PRESS OFFICE.

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside. 
2327. A Brief Memoir of the late Mrs. Agnes Baird. 1832.
An old woman with a dogmatic acquaintance with some facts in Glasgow history and an eager desire to expose the blunders of James Cleland. Her labour was thrown away. The bailie was “correction proof.” She is principally remembered by the quaint title of one of her hortatory pamphlets, “A Kick for a Bite.” 
—∴—

PRINTER – YOUNG & GALLIE.

Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace. 
2328. Angus (William), A.M. A Selection of Poetical and Dramatic pieces. 1821.
(See No. 2303.
—∴—

PRINTER – E. KHULL.

Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2329. The Scottish Tourist’s Steamboat Pocket Guide. 1835.
2330. The Pocket Guide to the Picturesque Scenery of Scotland. 1836.
—∴— 

PRINTER – UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns. 
2331. McPhun’s Guide through Glasgow. Fourth edition. 1837.
(See Nos. 2322, 2323.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – HEDDERWICK & SON.

Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus. 
2332. Whistle-Binkie. A Collection of Songs for the Social Circle. [First Edition.] 1832.
Edited by its publisher, David Robertson. It gradually extended to six series. (See Nos. 2320, 2584, 2586, 2588.) 
—∴— 

PRINTER – BELL & BAIN.

Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus. 
2333. Strang (John), LL.D. Travelling Notes in France, Italy, and Switzerland, of an Invalid in search of Health. 1863.
(See Nos. 381, 2384, 2475, 2500, 2501.) 
 

BOOKS RELATING TO GLASGOW BUT NOT PRINTED IN IT.

 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2334. Bailie (Robert). A Parallel or Briefe Comparison of the Litvrgie with the Masse-Book. London, 1641.
Robert Bailie (born 1603, died 1662), Professor of Theology, 1642-1661, Principal of the University, 1661-1662, and author of the well-known “Letters,” 1637-1662, was the son of Thomas Baillie, merchant in Glasgow, and Helen Gibson, daughter of Henry Gibson, Town-clerk of Glasgow. He married (1) Lilias Fleming of Cardaroch, and (2) Helen Strang, daughter of Dr. John Strang, Principal of the University, and widow of Dr. James Elliot. He was a man of sound judgment and much learning, and was a voluminous author. (See Nos. 2335-2339.) 
2335. Bailie (Robert). Ladensivm A𝛖𝛕𝛐𝛋𝛂𝛕à𝛋𝛒𝛊𝛔𝛊𝛓, the Canterbvrians self-conviction. 3rd Edition. [No place,] 1641.
2336. Baylie (Robert). An Historicall Vindication of the Government of the Church of Scotland. London, 1646.
2337. Baylie (Robert). A Dissvasive from the Errours of the Time. London, 1646.
2338. Bailie (Robert). Catechesis Elenctica Errorum qui hodie Vexant Ecclesiam. London, 1654.
2339. Bayly (Robert). A Parallel of the Liturgy, with the Mass-Book. [No place,] 1661.
2340. Sinclar (George). Ars Nova et Magna Gravitatis et Levitatis. Roterodami, 1669.
In this book Professor Sinclair describes a machine newly invented, which, from its shape resembling a bell, he terms Campana Urinatoria, and the diver Urinator. The inventor seems to have been Maul of Melgim, and it is mentioned that in 1665 he had, by means of it, brought up three pieces of ordnance from one of the Spanish vessels sunk near the island of Mull. (See Nos. 2341-2346.) 
2341. Sinclar (George). Hydrostatica. Edinburgh, 1672.
The unsold copies were re-issued in 1683 with a new titlepage and a dedication to the Magistrates of Edinburgh. 
In this work the author describes, at considerable length, a “Wooden Ark,” with a leaden footstool, which he thought would supercede the Diving Bell. “As the Ark is a most useful device for profit, so ’tis excellent for pleasure and recreation, if a man were disposed to see the ground and channels of deep waters, or were inclined to find out hydrostatical conclusions, a knowledge very profitable, and what few have attained to. Though it seems somewhat difficult to enter the Ark and go down below the water, yet a little use will expel all fear.” (See No. 2042.) 
2342. Sinclar (George). The Principles of Astronnomy and Navigation. Edinburgh, 1688.
In a Postscript the author again reverts to his “Ark,” and refers to the labours of Bailie James Colquohoun of Glasgow on the vessels of the Armada, who, being ignorant of the Diving Bell, went down several times, drawing or supplying air from above by a long pipe of leather. (See No. 2341.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen. 
2343. Sinclar (George). Proteus bound with Chains. Edinburgh, 1688.
This is part of the preceding work and is generally bound up along with it. It is an account of the weather-glass and its uses, and is an anticipation of Admiral Fitzroy and the Meteorological Society. The Professor points out the advantage that it would be to navigators to carry a barometer on board ship. (See No. 2342.) 
—∴— 
Lent by Robert Guy, The Wern, Mansewood, Pollokshaws. 
2344. Sinclar (George). Satan’s Invisible World discovered. Edinburgh, 1746.
2345. Sinclar (George). Satan’s Invisible World discovered. London, 1814.
George Sinclair, born in East Lothian, was appointed a Regent in the University of Glasgow during the Commonwealth. After the Restoration he was ejected on account of his political and church principles. He was then elected a Regent of the University of Edinburgh, and taught mathematics for several years. He devoted his spare time to practise as a mineral surveyor, and much curious information regarding early coal-mining may be gleaned from his works. After the Revolution he was restored to his Glasgow chair as Professor of Experimental Philosophy, which he held till 1699. 
He was a man of great industry and undoubted ability, but was deficient in grasp and insight. He discarded the teaching of the schools and resorted to observation and experiment, but he was unable fully to elicit the meaning of the phenomena he observed. The invention of Torricelli and the experiments of Pascal had created an interest in the subject of the pressure of the atmosphere and the equilibrium of fluids, and Sinclair devoted himself to these subjects with great assiduity. 
The work, however, by which he is best known is “Satan’s Invisible World discovered,” a collection of instances of witchcraft to prove that there are devils, spirits, witches, and apparitions, and to confound atheists. The Privy Council protected him in the copyright for eleven years. His weakness for witchcraft may perhaps be taken for an argument in favour of his mathematical genius, as Newton, Napier, and Whiston, all indulged in speculations upon the Apocalypse, and John Robison ()a Glasgow man, and for some time a Glasgow Professor), the distinguished Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh, took up with the French Revolution and wrote some wonderful pamphlets, &c. Professor Sinclair presented a number of books to the University Library. (See Nos. 2116, 2344.) 
—∴— 
Lent by Professor John Ferguson, LL.D., 13 Newton Place. 
2346. Agrippa (Henricus Cornelius). De Incertitvdine et Vanitate Scientiarum Declamatio. Coloniae, 1575.
This copy has the Autograph of Professor George Sinclair, author of “Satan’s Invisible World Discovered.” (See Nos. 2344, 2345.) 
“The Vanity of the Sciences” is a satire upon the learning of the age, and is a work of extraordinary sweep and compass, in which questions of every kind are discussed. Newspaper correspondents who, in the dull season air their views on fox-hunting, may claim “the Wise Cornelius” as an authority. Hunting and sporting, he says, are to be condemned for cruelty. “It is a fierce and cruel thing, when the poor beast, overcome by dogs, has its blood shed, its bowels torn out, to exult and count the end of pleasure gained” (c. lxxvii.). 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2347. Ross (Andrew), Professor of Humanity. Exercitatio Academica quâ Publicis suis Prælectionibus praeludebat Andreas Ross, vi die Mensis Aprilis, Anno MDCCX. Edinburgi, 1711.
2348. Forbes (William), Professor of Civil Law. Oratio Inauguralis De Natura… Juris Civilis: Habita XII. Kal. Mart. anno… MDCCXIV, in Auditorio publico Academiæ Glascuensis. Edinburgi, 1714.
With a portrait of the author, who was the first Professor of Civil Law in the University of Glasgow. 
2349. Carmichael (Professor Gershom). S. Puffendorfii de Officio Hominis et Civis juxta Legem Naturalem, Libri Duo. Edinburgi, 1724.
(See No. 2057.) 
2350. Carmichael (Professor Gershom). Breviuscula Introductio ad Logicam. Edinburgi, 1752.
For the use of Students of Philosophy in the University of Glasgow. (See No. 2058.) 
2351. A Vindication of Mr. Hutcheson, from the Calumnious Aspersions of a late Pamphlet. 1738.
A defence of Professor Francis Hutcheson (No. 1). (See No. 2093.) 
—∴— 
Lent by George Turner, 81 St. George’s Place. 
2352. L’Ordre Naturel et Essentiel des Sociétés Politiques, a Londres. 1767.
From the Library of Adam Smith, with his Bookplate. Adam Smith was Professor of Logic in the University of Glasgow, 1751-1752, and Professor of Moral Philosophy, 1752-1764. 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2353. Laskey (Captain J.). A General Account of the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow. 1813.
2354. Glasgow Rectorial Contest. 1836.
(See No. 2355.) 
—∴— 
Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick. 
2355. Hay (John Barras). Inaugural Addresses by Lords Rectors of the University of Glasgow. 1839.
It would be interesting to know how the Rector of the University came to be dubbed “Lord.” The University Calendar adheres to the modest and correct title of “Rector.” Equally curious is the prefix “Very Reverend” to the title of “Principal.” It certainly did not belong to “Old Glasgow.” 
2356. List of Subscribers to the Old College of Glasgow. [No date.]
This is a reprint about 1866. 
—∴— 
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross. 
2357. Monuments Romani Imperii, in Scotia, maxime vero inter vestigia valli, auspiciis Antonini Pii Imperatoris, a Fortha usque ad Glottam perducti, reperta, et in Academia Glasguensi adservata, iconibus expressa. [No place, nor date.]
This work gives copies of the Roman Inscribed Stones now in the Hunterian Museum of the University. It was published in 1778. 
2358. Specimens of Types and Inventory of Printing Materials belonging to the University Printing Office of Glasgow. [No date.]

 

Case H., pp.409-415.

BOOKS RELATING TO GLASGOW BUT NOT PRINTED IN IT – continued.

 

Lent by The Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
2359. Lowe (Dr. Peter). An Easie, Certaine, and Perfect Method to cure and preuent the Spanish Sicknes. London, 1596.
The author (No. 27) of this and the two following works was the father of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, Glasgow. (See Nos. 1461, 2360, 2361.)
—∴—
Lent by J. R. S. Hunter, LL.D., Daleville, Braidwood, Carluke.
2360. Lowe (Dr. Peter). A Discovrse of the Whole Art of Chyrvrgerie. Second Edition. London, 1612.
—∴—
Lent by The FAculty of Physicians and Surgeons, 242 St. Vincent Street.
2361. Lowe (Dr. Peter). A Discovrse of the Whole Art of Chirvrgerie. Second Edition. London, 1612.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2362. Jack (Thomas). Onomasticon Poeticvm. Edinburgi, 1592.
Excudebat Robertus Waldegraue.
Thomas Jack was minister of Eastwood, and Master of the Grammar School of Glasgow.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2363. Boyd (Zacharie). The Last Battell of the Sovle in Death. In Two Volumes. Edinburgh, 1629.
Printed by the Heires of Andro Hart. This book was first issued in 1628 in one volume, and re-issued in two volumes in the following year. (See Nos. 17, 2033, 2035, 2364, 2365, 2367, 2565.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2364. Boyd (Zacharie). Ad Carolvm Magnæ Britanniæ Regem, Oratio Panegyrica. Edinburgi, 1633.
Excudebat Iohannes Wreittoun.
Zachary Boyd’s Address to Charles I. at Holyrood was delivered on June 17, 1633. (See No. 2363.)
—∴—
Lent by Professor John Ferguson, LL.D., 13 Newton Place.
[2365. Boyd (Zachary). The Last Battle of the Soul in Death. Edited by Gabriel Neil. Glasgow, 1831.]
This, the editor’s own copy, made up from the proof sheets, with his autograph, is a reprint of No. 2363. It contains a long introductory notice, with many note4sa, and a fine engraving of the portrait in the University. (See Nos. 372, 2364.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2366. Hampton (Christopher). A Sermon preached in the Cittie of Glasco in Scotland, on the Tenth day of June, 1610. London, 1611.
Dr. Christopher Hampton was one of the three English doctors who attended the Earl of Dunbar as King’s Commissioner at the General Assembly at Glasgow in 1610. In 1613 he became Archbishop of Armagh, and died 1634.
—∴—
Lent by Professor John Ferguson, LL.D., 13 Newton Place.
2367. The CL. Psalmes of David. Edinburgh, 1622.
Printed by Andro Hart. This copy of Knox’s Prayer Book and the Psalms has the autographs of Zachary Boyd and Principal Dunlop. It belonged to Robert Foulis, and latterly to David Laing.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2368. A Trve Relation of the Proceedings against Iohn Ogilvie, a Iesuit, executed at Glasgow, the last of Februarie, anno 1615. Edinburgh, 1615.
John Ogilvie was a Jesuit who was apprehended in Glasgow, charged under statutes which constituted certain acts treason, tried before Archbishop Spottiswood, convicted and executed. This volume is the Archbishop’s defence of the trial and condemnation, in answer to another account published at Douay. The Jesuits were viewed in those days very much as Anarchists are in ours. Special legislation was directed against them, just as was done a few years later in the case of the unfortunate Covenanters.
2369. [Spottiswood (Archbishop John).] Refvtatio Libelli De Regimine Ecclesiæ Scoticanæ. Londini, 1620.
By John Spottiswood, Archbishop of Glasgow, 1612-1615, and of St. Andrew’s, 1615-1639. This is the only one of his works which was published by himself. It was intended as a refutation of David Calderwood’s “De regimine Ecclesiæ Scoticanæ brevis Relatio.” Calderwood immediately replied to the Archbishop in the “Vindiciæ” subjoined to his “Altare Damascenum.” The subject of controversy was “The Five Articles of Perth.” Spottiswood was buried in Westminster Abbey.
2370. A True Relation of the Inhuman Cruelties lately acted by teh Rebels in Scotland, with the Manner of their taking of Glascough, rifling the Lord Archbishop’s House… London, 1679.
This piece has reference to the attack on Glasgow by the Covenanters, which preceded teh battle of Bothwell Brig. There will be a difference of opinion as to the party which was guilty of “the inhuman cruelties.” (See No. 2371.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2371. A Proclamation anent Persons denunced Fugitives for their being in the Late Rebellion, 1679. Edinburgh, 1684.
Contains Lists for Glasgow, GOvan, Rutherglen, etc. The “Late Rebellion” was the Affair of Bothwell. (See No. 2370.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2372. Cockburn (William), Episcopal Minister. A Sermon upon the xxxth of January, 1713. Being the Anniversary Fast for the Martyrdom of the Blessed King Charles the First. Preached at Glasgow. Edinburgh, 1713.
Mr. Cockburn, having taken the oaths, “set up the English Liturgy ay Glasgow” in NOvember, 1712. “Thus,” says Wodrow, “that is begun in Glasgow which was scarce ever expected to be seen once in my day.” On 10th February, 1713, he writes: “When I am in Glasgow, I cannot but acquaint you that this last post I have Mr. Cockburn’s sermon on January 30 in print.”
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2373. A Letter from a Gentleman at Glasgow, containing an Impartial History of the late Tumults at Glasgow on the Commencement of the Malt Tax. London, 1725.
An Account of the Shawfield Riots. (See Nos. 606, 2596.)
—∴—
Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
22374. Scruton (James). Mercantile Penmanship, or Writing and Flourishing. Illustrated in all the hands proper for the Compting-house. Glasgow, 1768.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2375. The Holy Bible. Edinburgh, 1715.
Printed and published by James Watson. A fine specimen of Old Scottish Morocco Binding with leather cover and flap. It was the Church Bible of Ann Kelburn or Barclay (No. 34.)
—∴—
Lent by John Ingram, 13 Grafton Square.
2376. Hamilton (William) of Bangour. Poems. Edinburgh, 1760.
This volume has the Book-plates of John Hunter and his wife Anne Home, authoress of “My mother bids me bind my hair,” also the autograph of “Annie Home.” (See Nos. 2185, 2186.)
—∴—
Lent by The Directors of Stirling’s Library.
2377. Debates on the Evidence delivered in the Trial of Warren Hastings. London, 1797.
This is a Presentation Copy from Warren Hastings “to Mr. Stirling’s Library.”
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, CArdross.
2378. Paterson (Ninian). Epigrammatum Libri Octo. Edinburghi, 1678.
The author born and educated in Glasgow, became minister of Liberton. His Latin poems are well turned, and were highly esteemed by his contemporaries. The “Scotch Presbyterian Eloquence” has not much good to say of him as a clergyman.
2379. An Account of the late Proceedings in Parliament, relating to the Money granted for the Relief of the City of Glasgow. London, 1749.
Provost Andrew Cochrane (No. 455), and Bailie George Murdoch (No. 73), were sent to London in 1749 “to apply to his Majesty and Parliament for re-imbursing the sums extorted from the town, upon account of the town’s loyaly, by the rebels during the late unnatural rebellion.” They were successful in obtaining a grant of £10,000. (See Nos. 2153, 2602, 2616-2626.)
—∴—
Lent by John Oswald Mitchell, LL.D., 7 Huntly Gardens.
2380. Watt (James), Engineer. A scheme for making a Navigable Canal from the City of Glasgow to the Monkland Coalierys. [No place, nor date, about 1769.]
Possibly unique. (See Nos. 125, 1794.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2381. Narrative of The Loss of the “Comet” Steam Packet on her passage from Inverness to Glasgow, on Friday, the 21st October, 1825. Edinburgh, 1825. Edinburgh, 1825.
(See No. 1968.)
2382. Halliwell (James Orchard). Some Account of a Collection of Early Penny Merriments and Histories, printed at Glasgow, 1695-8. [London], 1864.
Only 25 copies printed. (See Nos. 2537-2548.)
2383. Proposed Railways between Edinburgh and Glasgow. Edinburgh, 1830-1832.
A number of separate Pamphlets and Maps.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2384. Strang (John). Noctes Sma’ Weftianæ, the web whereof being woven by various hands, was afterwards cut, pieced, and again put together by that cunning workman, John Strang, the original pattern drawer and designer of the same. Glasgow, 1849.
This unique volume consists of thirteen original articles from the columns of The Scots Times, mounted and bound, with a special titlepage and preface. These jeux d’esprits were written by Mr. (Afterwards Dr.) Strang, Allan Fullerton, J. D. Carrick, John Kerr, William Weir, and the Editor of The Scots Times, Robert Malcolm. The first number appeared on 3d October, 1829. (See “Glasgow and its Clubs,” 3d ed. p. 435.) The names of persons referred to in the text are supplied in MS. (See No. 2333,)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2385. Laws of Cricket observed by the Western Cricket Club of Glasgow, instituted in 1829. [No place, nor date.]
Has a list of the members, nearly 100 in number.
—∴—
David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2386. [Davidson (Thomas).] Political Letters by Lucius Verus. London, 1831.
These letters were addressed by Thomas Davidson, Junior (No. 334), to James Ewing and others.
—∴—
Lent by The Directors of Stirling’s Library.
2387. Victoria (Queen). More Leaves from the Journal of a Life in the Highlands, from 1862 to 1882. Fifth Edition. London, 1884.
This copy, a presentation to Stirling’s Library from the Queen, bears Her Majesty’s Autograph.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2388. The Trial of the Rev. Neil Douglas for Sedition. Edinburgh, 1817.
Douglas was a “Universalist Preacher,” or “Preacher of Restoration,” as he styled himself, “old, deaf, dogged, honest, and respectable.” In the course of his sermons he likened the King to Nebuchadnezzar and to Belshazzar, asserted that the House of Commons was corrupt, and thought that Waterloo was nothing to brag about. He was tried for sedition and found not guilty. He was also the author of “King David’s Psalms… with notes… dedicated to Messiah,” Glasgow, 1815. With portrait engraved by R. Gray from a picture by J. Brooks. In the same year he published the “Paraphrases,” with an “Improvement” to each. He printed these himself. (See No. 2663.)
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2389. Atkinson (Thomas). Miscellanies in Prose and Verse. In Three Volumes. London, 1833.
The author was a bookseller in Glasgow, and a member of the firm of Robertson & Atkinson from 1823 to 1830. During this time he edited and published “The Ant,” a weekly periodical. (See No. 2693.) In 1830 the partnership was dissolved, each partner carrying on business on his own account. In 1832 and 1833 he issued three successive series of his essays, &c., under the title of “The Chameleon,” and in the latter year they were re-issued as “MIscellanies,” and characterised by himself as “all of his writings that he wishes to be remembered by.” Daniel Macmillan, the well-known publisher, was his shopman. Atkinson died on board ship on his way to Barbadoes, in 1833, and was buried at sea in a coffin which he had taken with him. (See Nos. 272, 354, 2314.)
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2390. The Holy Bible. London, 1658.
A Pocket Bible in Morocco Binding, with silver clasp, which belonged to George Brown of Capelrig, and to his father, George Brown, Dean of Guild. (See Nos. 394, 2569, 2570.)
—∴—
Lent by David, Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2391. Mayne (John). Glasgow. A Poem. London, 1803.
Printed by D. Walker, Gloucester.
This poem originally appeared in the “Glasgow Magazine” of December, 1783. (See No. 2646.) The author was at that time a printer in the employment of Andrew Foulis. He went to London in 1787, and died there in 1836. He also wrote the “Silelr Gun” and “Hallowe’en”; the latter, published in 1780, was thought by some to have suggested Burns’s poem on the same subject. While in Glasgow he wrote the song-
“By Logan’s streams that rin sae deep
Fu’ aft, wi’ glee, I’ve herded sheep.”
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2392.
Chronicles of the Secret Order of Saint Mungo. Edinburgh, 1836.
2393. Information. John Rae against John Crosse, merchant in Glasgow. Edinburgh, 1745.
2394. Trial of George Gilchrist, Wiliam Gilchrist, and James Brown, for the Robbery of the Prince Regent Coach, 1831. Edinburgh, 1838.
2395. Report of the Trial of William Heath and Elizabeth Crowder, for the Robbery of the Banking Office of Messrs. J. & R. Watson. Glasgow, 1831.

 

2396. Trial and Sentence of Dolan, Redding, and Hickie, for the Murder of John Green. Glasgow, [no date.]

 

Case I., pp.415-416.

EARLY GLASGOW NEWSPAPERS.

 

Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2397. Glasgow Journal. 3 to 10 August, 1741.
2398. Glasgow Courant. 18 to 25 November, 1745.
—∴—
Lent by Miss Brown, Lanfine, Newmilns.
2399. Glasgow Courant. April 26, 1746.
This number contains a printed Plan of the Battle of Culloden.
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Gilchrist, 5 Montgomerie Crescent, Kelvinside.
2400. Glasgow Journal. 23 to 30 September, 1745.
An Account of the Battle of Prestonpans is printed in this number.
—∴—
Lent by James Finlayson, M.D., 2 Woodside Place.
2401. Glasgow Journal. No. 734, August 25, September 1, 1755.
—∴—
Lent by W. W. Dykes, 26 Montague Street.
2402. Glasgow Courant. 22nd-29th November, 1756.
—∴—
Lent by The Bute Archæological Society, Rothesay.
2403. Glasgow JOurnal. 7th-14th April, 1768.
2404. Glasgow Weekly Chronicle. 10th-17th February, 1768.
—∴—
Lent by The Misses Dunlop, Tolcross House, Tolcross.
2405. Glasgow Weekly Chronicle. December 15-22, 1768.
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2406. Glasgow Chronicle: or, Weekly Intelligencer. February 5-12, 1778.
—∴—
Lent by William Campbell Ure, 16 Roclea Terrace, Kelvinside.
2407. Glasgow Journal. December 26, 1782, January 2, 1783.
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2408. Glasgow Mercury. 1782-1783.
—∴—
Lent by The Proprietors of the Glasgow Herald, 67 Buchanan Street.
2409. Glasgow Advertiser and Evening Intelligencer. 1789-1790.
The forerunner of the “Glasgow Herald,” beginning in 1782.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2410. Glasgow Courier. Tuesday, October 30, 1792.
—∴—
Lent by George H. Maclaren, Dunvegan, Helensburgh.
2411. Glasgow Courier. June 28, 1798.
2412. Glasgow courier. November 9, 1805.
This number has an account of the death of Lord Nelson.
—∴—
Lent by The Proprietors pf the Glasgow Herald, 67 Buchanan Street.
2413. Herald and Advertiser. 1805.
This was the continuation of No. 2409, and started in 1802.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2414. Caledonian. 1807.
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Hamilton Donald, 8 Blythswood Square.
2415. Glasgow Chronicle. February 27, 1812.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2416. Glasgow Sentinel. 1821.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2417. Glasgow Journal. Friday, September 20th, 1822.
—∴—
Lent by David Gillies, Montgomerie Street, North Kelvinside.
2418. Scots Times. 22 October, 1825.
Edited by Robert Malcolm. (See Nos. 360, 2384.)
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Hamilton Donald, 8 Blythswood Square.
2419. Glasgow Herald. 2 March, 1812.
—∴—
Lent by The Proprietors of the Glasgow Herald, 67 Buchanan Street.
2420. Glasgow Herald. 1815.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2421. Glasgow Free Press. 1824.
W. Bennet was the editor of this paper. (See Nos. 384, 2729.)
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2422. Glasgow Cornucopia. November 19, 1831.
—∴—
Lent by H. A. Finlay, 58 Renfield Street.
2423. Scottish Guardian. 1833.
Printed by George Brookman.
2424. Glasgow Evening Post, and Paisley and Renfrewshire Reformer. 1831.
Printed by Robert McGregor.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2425. Glasgow Citizen, or West of Scotland Journal and Advertiser. April 1, 1848.
James Hedderwick was editor of this weekly, which began its career in 1842. The “Evening Citizen” started in 1864.
—∴—
Lent by John H. Jackson, 167 West Regent Street.
2426. Reformers’ Gazette. August 18, 1849.
This copy is printed in blue ink, having been issued on the occasion of the Queen’s first visit to the Clyde in 1849. This newspaper was edited by Peter Mackenzie, “Loyal Peter.” (See Nos. 356, 2714, 2799.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2427. Indictment against John Caldwell, for Robbing the Post Boy, &c. 17th September, 1736.

 

Case J., pp.417-418.

PLAY BILLS, BROADSHEETS, MUSIC SHEETS, ETC.

 

Lent by Robert Wylie, 45 Buchanan Street.
2428. Play Bills of the Theatre Royal, from January to May. 1809.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2429. Subscription sheet for building a Theatre in Glasgow; by shares of £25 each. 1802.
This sheet was issued by Chapman & Lang, booksellers.
—∴—
Lent by James Darroch, 80 Belville Street, Greenock.
2430. Play Bills of the Minor Theatre, late Cook’s Circus, Glasgow Green.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2431. Play Bills of the Olympic Circus, Albion Street. 1806.
—∴—
Lent by John Adamson, Craigadam, Kirkcudbrightshire.
2432. Play Bill of the Theatre Royal. The BUrning of Moscow. 20th July, 1813.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2433. Advertisement Bills, Posters, &c. A Collection. 1828-1829.
2434. Advertisement Bills, Posters, &c. A Collection. 1828-1829.
—∴—
Lent by John Paterson, 24 Maxwelton Street, Paisley.
2435. Music. The Respository of Scots and Irish airs, Strathspeys, Reels, etc. In Two Volumes. [No date.]
Printed and sold by J. McFadyen.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2436. Poster. New Theatre Royal, Dunlop Street. First Bill. December, 1829.
—∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2437. Musical Catechism. Printed with Raised Type for the Blind. Third edition enlarged, with tunes: for the use of the blind. 1838.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2438.
Music. A selection of Scotch, English, Irish, and foreign airs adapted to the fife, violin, or German flute. [No date.]
Printed and sold by James Aird.
2439. Advertisement Bills, Posters, &c. A Collection. 1829-1830.
—∴—
Lent by John Paterson, 24 Maxwelton Street, Paisley.
2440. Music. A Collection of Sheets. [No dates.]
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Patterson, M.D., 22 India Street.
2441. Broadsides:- 1. Meet me on the Gowan Lea.  2. Campbell’s Gathering.  3. The Parting of Burns and Highland Mary.  4. Loss of the “Orion.” (See Nos. 223, 865.)  5. The vile Viggish Dodge! [No dates.]
—∴—
Lent by James Robb, 8 Carlton Place.
2442. Broadsides. A Collection. [No dates.]
—∴—
Lent by John H. Jackson, 167 West Regent Street.
2443. Gotham in Alarm: a Farce. 1816.
2444. More News from Gotham: a Farce. 1816.
(See Nos. 2443, 2548.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2445. Broadside. Melpomene Glascuensis, or the Unfeigned Tears of the Town of Glasgow upon the Death of Mary, Queen of Great Britain, France, and Ireland. 1694.
This is a funeral elegy on the death of Queen Mary, written by John M’Ure, the Keeper of the Register of Sasines, and Historian of Glasgow. He reprints it in his “View of the City of Glasgow,” and gives this account of it:- “A few years after was removed by death our royal Queen Mary, whose death was much lamented by the city, in so much that they importuned the author to compose an elegy which is here subjoined.” Poetic talent must have been at a low ebb in Glasgow if M’Ure was the city laureate. In his 74th year he composed a doggerel inscription for his tombstone. He died in May, 1747, aged 96. (See Nos. 2448, 2449, 2450.)
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Hamilton Donald, 8 Blythswood Square.
2446. List of Subscribers to the Nelson Monument. [No date.]
—∴—
Lent by Andrew Roy, 425 Sauchiehall Street.
2447. Collection of Dying Speeches of Criminals executed in Glasgow and elsewhere. [No dates.]

 

Case K., pp.418-422.

 

_20180325_232519

Lent by Anthony Dixon Brogan, 71 Cambridge Drive, Kelvinside.
2448. M’Ure (John). A View of the City of Glasgow, or an Account of its Origin, Rise, and Progress. By JOhn M’Ure alias Campbel. 1736.
Printed by James Duncan. This is the first-known History of the City; it has several folding views and a portrait of the author. “M’Ure’s book, though the oldest, is yet the best which we have on the subject. It is, at the same time, only too obvious that, even if he could have had access to the Records from which the Annals of the City must be written, he was without the knowledge necessary either to read or to understand them. His mistakes, gross as they are, have been, for the most part, implicitly copied by his successors, a few of whom were more competent than himself, and some, indeed, even still more illiterate.” So Says Joseph Robertson, editor of The Glasgow Constitutional, writing in 1846. And yet with all this are we not thankful to have M’Ure such as he is! (See Nos. 2445, 2449, 2450.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2449. M’Ure (John. A View of the City of Glasgow. 1736.
This copy, a duplicate of No. 2448, has the following inscription:- “This book was given to me when I was at Glasgow in Aug., 1740, by Mr. Robert Foulis, Printer and Bookseller in that City. Wm. Cole, Cantabr. A.M.” The writer, Rev. William Cole, has added a number of MS. notes to the volume.

 

2450. M’Ure (John). The History of Glasgow. A New Edition. 1830.
Printed by Hutchison & Brookman. This, the first and only reprint of the original edition (Nos. 2448, 2449), was edited by the publisher, Duncan Macvean.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2451. Crosse (William). A Loyal Address to the Citizens of Glasgow, occasioned by the Present Rebellion. 1745.
The author, who was a son of John Cross, merchant, Glasgow, and born in 1711, was Sheriff of Lanarkshire, and in 1746 was appointed Professor of Law in the University. He was present at the battle of Falkirk along with the Glasgow Volunteers, and wrote an account of the engagement. (See Nos. 65, 66, 69.)
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2452. Gibson (John). The History of Glasgow from the earliest accounts to the present time. 1777.
Printed by Robert Chapman and Alexander Duncan for the author. This volume contains an early plan of the City.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2453. The Glasgow Register, being an Eaxct List of the Magistrates, and other Office-Bearers in that City, from the most Acient Records down to the Present Year. 1781.
2454. A Letter to the Citizens of Glasgow, containing a Short View of the Management of the Poors Funds, under the Administration of the General Session. 1783.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2455. Ure (David), A.M. The History of Rutherglen and East Kilbride. 1793.
This early local history contains many plates, with views of places and figures of fossils, &c.
As a geological observer the author was far in advance of his time. His life, &c., by John Gray, was published as a supplement to this volume in 1865.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2456. Brown (Andrew).History of Glasgow; and of Paisley, Greenock, and Port-Glasgow. 1795-1797.
Printed by William Paton. This is the complete work. The second volume appeared several years after the first, and tthey are consequently often found as odd volumes.
2457. Denholm (James). An HIstorical Account and Topographical Description of the City of Glasgow and Suburbs. [First Edition.] 1797.
Printed by and for R. Chapman, and Stewart & Meikle. This is the first edition of Denholm’s “History.” (See Nos. 129, 2458, 2460.)
2458. Denholm (James). The History of the City of Glasgow and Suburbs. Second Edition. 1798.
2459. An Act (passed 30th June, 1800), for Extending the Royalty of the City of Glasgow. London, 1800.
This is the First Police Act for Glasgow.
2460. Denholm (james). The History of the City of Glasgow and Suburbs. Third Edition. 1804.
(See No.s 2457, 2458.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2461. Laurie (David). A Project for Erecting Public Markets and a Grand Academy, on Improved Principles, in the Gorbals. 1810.
—∴—
Lent by Andrew J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
2462. Chapman (Robert). The Picture of Glasgow, or Stranger’s Guide. [First Edition.] 1806.
This, the first edition, was like the subsequent ones, the work of Robert Chapman, its publisher. (See Nos. 2463, 2464.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2463. Chapman (Robert). The Picture of Glasgow, or Stranger’s Guide. New [the Second] Edition. 1812.
Printed by and for R. Chapman. (See No. 2462.)
2464. Chapman (Robert). The Picture of Glasgow, and Strangers’ Guide. Third Edition. 1818.
Printed by and for R. Chapman. A later issue is dated 1820, with a new titlepage and preface. The title bears, “The Topographical Picture of Glasgow in its Ancient and Modern State.” (See No. 2463.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2465. Cleland (James), LL.D. A Description of the Manner of Improving the Green of Glasgow. 1813.
(See Nos. 215, 2466, 2467, 2474, 2488.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2466. Cleland (James), LL.D. Annals of Glasgow. In Two Volumes. 1816.
(See No. 2465.)
2467. Cleland (James), LL.D. The Rise and Progress of the City of Glasgow. 1820.
(See No. 2466.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2468. A Guide to Glasgow, Arranged in Walks through the City and Suburbs. 1821.
—∴—
Lent by Jospeh Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2469. Owen (Robert). Report of a Plan for Relieving Public Distress and Removing Discontent by giving Employment to the Poor and Working Classes. 1821.
Robert Owen was the son-in-law of David Dale (see Nos. 163, 347, 519, 529), and projector of the socialist communities at Lanark and elsewhere. His son, Robert Dale Owen, well-known as a spiritualist, was born in Glasgow, 9th November, 1800, but at an early age became a citizen of the United States of America.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Glasgow.
2470. Wade (rev. W. M.). A Tour of Modern, and Peep into Ancient, Glasgow. 1822.
Printed by J. Neilson, Paisley. Has an engraved map of the city. A second issue appeared the same year under the title of “Glasgow Ancient and Modern,” with no publisher’s name.
—∴—
Lent by Kenneth McLean, 19 Renfrew Street.
2471. Glasgow Delineated; or, A Description of the City. 1824.
This is a second issue of the first edition, which was published by Wardlaw & Cunninghame in 1821. A second edition was published in 1826, with additional engravings,and of this a re-issue was made in 1836, with ten pages of “addenda.” (See No. 2485.)
—∴—
Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick.
2472. Account of Ceremonial, etc., at Laying the Foundation Stone of Knox’s Monument, in the Merchants’ Park. 1825.
The Merchants’ Park is now known as the Necropolis, where Knox’s monument still crowns the hill. (See Nos. 2475, 2486.)
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2473. Rules of The Maitland Club, instituted March, MDCCCXXVIII.
(See Nos. 2477, 2478, 2484.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2474. Cleland (James), LL.D. The Rise and Progress of the City of Glasgow. 1829.
This is a re-issue of No. 2467 with a new titlepage. (See Nos. 2465, 2466, 2467, 2488.)
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2475. Strang (John), [LL.D.] Necropolis Glasguensis, with observations on ancient and modern tombs and sepultures. 1831.
This, the author’s own copy, is on pink paper – the only one known. (See Nos. 2333, 2384, 2472, 2486.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2476. Buchanan (Moses S.). History of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, from 1787. 1832.

 

Case L., pp.422-425.

BOOKS RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF GLASGOW – continued.

 

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive. Kelvinside.
2477. Duncan (William James). Notices and Documents illustrative of the Literary History of Glasgow, during the greater part of last century. 1831.
This work was printed for the Maitland Club.
The author was the late manager of the National Bank of Scotland, and son of Richard Duncan of the Ship Bank, the treasurer of the Maitland Club. He edited Wodrow’s “Collections” for that Society. (See No. 2473.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2478. Inventory of the Ornaments, Reliques, Jewels, Vestments, Books, etc., belonging to the Cathedral Church of Glasgow, M.CCCC.XXXII. 1831.
Printed for the Maitland Club.
Edited by John Dillon, writer, and Sheriff-substitute at Glasgow. (See No. 2477.)
2479. Some Notices of John Crawfurd, Esq., one of the candidates for the representation of the city. 1832.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2480. Political Pamphlets, a Collection. 1832.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2481. Observations on the State and Management of Burgh Property, when owned by several proprietors. 1833.
—∴—
Lent by David M. Gray, The Neuck, Larbert.
2482. Glasgow Illustrated in a series of Picturesque Views, drawn and engraved by J. Scott, with Historical and Descriptive Illustrations by John Gullan. 1834.
A serial publication. This copy is in the original numbers.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2483. Companion to the Glasgow Botanic Garden. [No date.]
Printed by James Hedderwick. This early guide contains a Plan of the Garden, which was then in Sauchiehall Street, where Fitzroy Place now stands.
—∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2484. Memorabilia of the City of Glasgow, selected from the Minute Books of the Burgh, MDLXXXVIII – MDCCL. Index. 1835.
Printed for the Maitland Club. (See No. 2484A.)
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2484A. Memorabilia of the City of Glagsow, selected from The Minute Books of the Burgh, MDLXXXVIII-MDCCL. 1868.
This is a reprint, with corrections, of the work to which the preceding entry (No. 2484) is an Index. The reprint was edited by the late William West Watson, City Chamberlain.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2485. Glasgow Delineated in its Institutions, Manufactures, and Commerce. 1836.
No printer’s name, published by Andrew Lottimer. This is the second issue of the second edition (No. 2471), having ten pages of “addenda” to bring it up to date.
2486. A Companion to the Necropolis. 1836.
Printed by Edward Khull. (See Nos. 2472, 2475.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2487. Constitution and Regulations of the Glasgow and Clydesdale Statistical Society. Instituted, April, MDCCCXXXVI.
This was issued with the Transactions of the Society.
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2488. Cleland (James), LL.D. Description of the Banquet in honour of Sir Robert Peel, Bart., M.P., Lord Rector of the University. 1837.
It was at this banquet that the late Norman Macleod, D.D. made his first public speech. (See Nos. 321, 2465.)
—∴—
Lent by W. A. Liddell, 13 Argyll Place, Partick.
2489. Proceedings of the Peel Club, University of Glasgow, Session 1836-1837. 1837.
Printed by JOhn Smith & Son. A periodical publication. (See No. 2750.)
—∴—
Lent by Archibald Hamilton Donald, 8 Blythswood Square.
2490. Rules and Regulations of the Junto. Established MDCCCXXXVIII. 1838.
—∴—
Lent by Joseph Hannah, 122 Renfield Street.
2491. Watt (Alexander). The Glasgow Mortality Bill for 1839. 1840.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2492. Chronicles of Saint Mungo: or, Antiquities and Traditions of Glasgow. 1843.
One of the best of the Glasgow Histories. The author was Wallace Harvey.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2493. History of Glasgow Green. 1845.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Mongomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2494. Pagan (James). Sketches of the History of Glasgow. 1847.
The author was for a number of years the esteemed editor of the Glasgow Herald. (See No. 359.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2495. Logan (William). Moral Statistics of Glasgow. 1849.
2496. Hamilton (Mathie). Glasgow in the Olden Time. 1851.
(See No. 2497.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2497. Reid (Robert) and others. Glasgow, Past and Present. In Two Volumes. 1851.
“Glasgow Past and Present” comprises Reports of cases decided by the Dean of Guild Court, original papers by Robert Reid (Senex); John Buchanan, LL.D. (J. B.); Mathie Hamilton, M.D. (Aliquis), and various other articles which appeared in the Glasgow Herald. Robert Reid was best known as “Senex,” though his first nom de plume was “Velutus.” (See Nos. 451B, 2498, 2504.)
2498. Reid (Robert) and others. Glasgow Past and Present. [Second Edition.] In Three Volumes. 1884.
This is a second edition of No. 2497, with many additions and an excellent Index by David Robertson, its pubisher.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2499. Kyle’s Description of Glasgow. 1852.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2500. Strang (John), LL.D. Glasgow and its Clubs. [First Edition.] London, 1856.
Published by Richard Griffin and Company. (See Nos. 381, 2233, 2384, 2475, 2501.)
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2501. Strang (John), LL.D. Glasgow and its Clubs. Second Edition. London, 1857.
Published by Richard Griffin and Company. A third edition was published in 1864. (See No. 2500.)
—∴—
Lent by Robert Walker, 175 Sauchiehall Street.
2502. Midnight Scenes and Social Photographs: being sketches of life in the streets, wynds, and dens of the city. 1858.
—∴—
Lent by R. Bennett Browne, Bendarroch, Garelochhead.
2503. Connal ([Sir] Michael). Memorial relative to the Hospital of Saint Nicholas. 1862.
This pamphlet contains a photographic copy of part of the original Manuscript.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2504. Reid (Robert) [Senex]. Old Glasgow and its Environs. 1864.
This volume, supplementary to “Glasgow Past and Present,” contains similar articles. It has a portrait of the author, and was published in the 92nd year of his age. (See Nos. 2497, 2498.)
2505. Mackenzie (Peter). Reminiscences of Glasgow and the West of Scotland. In Two Volumes. 1865.
(See Nos. 356, 2426, 2714, 2799.)
2506. Gordon (Rev. J. F. S.) D.D. Glasghu Facies: a View of the City of Glasgow. In Two Volumes. 1872.

 

Case M., pp.425-428.

BOOKS RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF GLASGOW – continued.

 

Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2507. The Old Country Houses of the Old Glasgow Gentry. Second Edition. 1878.
This, like the first edition, contains a hundred photographs of country houses connected with Glasgow, and reduced copies of several maps of the city. The genealogical and descriptive notices in this edition were for the most part written or greatly enlarged by the late John Guthrie Smith and John Oswald Mitchell, LL.D. The late John Buchanan, LL.D. (J.B.) contributed most of the letterpress to the first edition.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2508. Macgeorge (Andrew). Old Glasgow: the Place and the People. 1880.
2509. MacGregor (George). The HIstory of Glasgow. 1881.
2510. Stewart (George). Curiosities of Glasgow Citizenship as exhibited chiefly in the Business Career of its old Commercial Aristocracy. 1881.
(See No. 2511.)

 

2511. Stewart (George). Progress of Glasgow during the last century. 1883.
(See No. 2510.)
—∴—
Lent by Robert Brydall, F.S.A.Scot., 8 Newton Terrace.
2512. History of the Incorporation of Wrights in Glasgow. 1883.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2513. Kirkwood (Charles). Dictionary of Glasgow and Vicinity. 1884.
—∴—
Lent by Robert Brydall, F>S>A>Scot., 8 Newton Terrace.
2514. The Queen’s Guard of Honour at Loch Katrine, 1859. Edited by Nicholas Dickson. 1885.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2515. Comic History of Glasgow. 1886.
This was published at the office of “The Chiel,” in the columns of which weekly periodical it first appeared.
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2516. Memoirs and Portraits of One Hundred Glasgow Men who have died during the last thirty years, and in their lives did much to make the City what it now is. In Two Volumes. 1886.
This work was edited by the late James MacLehose, its publisher, many of the biographical notices being contributed by the late John Guthrie Smith, Dr. J. O. Mitchell, and others. (See No. 2507.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2517. Order of Service with Prayers to be used in Glasgow Cathedral on the 16th of June, 1887, in celebration of the Jubilee of the reign of Queen Victoria. 1887.
2518. Wallace (Andrew). Popular Traditions of Glagsow. 1889.
—∴—
Lent by The Regality Club, Glasgow.
2519. The Regality Club. First and Second Series. 1889.
These volumes contain eight separate issues which were printed for the members of the Regality Club only. They have numerous papers descriptive of “Old Glasgow,” with etchings and other illustrations.

 

DIRECTORIES.

 

Lent by Robert Wylie, 45 Buchanan Street.
2520. John Tait’s Directory for the City of Glasgow, Villages of Anderston, Calton and Gorbals; also for the Towns of Paisley, Greenock, Port-Glasgow, and Kilmarnock. From the 15th May, 1783, to the 15th May, 1784.
2521. Jones’s Directory or Useful Pocket Companion, for the year 1789. 1789.
This directory was printed by John Mennons.
The compiler was Nathaniel Jones, keeper of the Exchange. In 1784 we find him advertising that “he has opened a register for servants wanting places, at his house in Prince’s Street.” His father was Ryce Jones. overseer of Bell’s Tannarie.
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2522. Jones’s Directory for 1789. 1866.
This is a reprint of the preceding (No. 2521), and has an introduction by the late James MacLehose, its publisher, with Manuscript Notes on early Glasgow Directories and on well-known Glasgow citizens of the period, by the late John Buchanan, LL.D. (J. B.) At the date of this reprint the original was believed to be the earliest Glasgow directory extant. (See No. 2520.)
—∴—
Lent by A. F. Hamilton, 12 Oakfield Terrace, Hillhead.
2523. Jones’s Directory or Useful Pocket Companion, for the year 1792-1793. 1792.
—∴—
Lent by Robert Wylie, 45 Buchanan Street.
2524. Glasgow Directory, containing a list of the Merchants, Manufacturers, Traders, etc. Corrected till July, 1800.
2525. Glasgow Directory. July, 1801.
2526. Glasgow Directory. July, 1803.
This issue and No. 2525 were published by W. McFeat & Co.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2527. Glasgow Directory. 1825.
This issue contains engraved illustrated advertisements, and a map of the city.
—∴—
Lent by Andrew Roy, 425 Sauchiehall Street.
2528. Glasgow Directory. 1828.
This issue was published by W. McFeat.

 

ALMANACKS.

 

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2529. The Glasgow Almanack for the year 1765.
Printed by Archibald McLean, Jun.
2530. The Glasgow Almanack for the year 1784.
Has a map of the City.
—∴—
Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace.
2531. The Glasgow Almanack for the year 1785.
—∴—
Lent by Major F. W. Allan, 21 Derby Street.
2532. The Glasgow Almanack for 1795.
—∴—
Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace.
2533. The Glasgow Almanack for 1797.
2534. The Glasgow Almanack for 1799.
This issue and the four preceding entries were printed by J. Mennons, publisher of the “Advertiser” (No. 2409.)
2535. The Glasgow Almanack for 1802.
Printed by J. & T. Mennons.
2536. The British Almanack and Glasgow Register for 1808.
Printed for J. A. Duncan, Glasgow, by W. McMillan & Co., Edinburgh.

 

Case N., pp.428-430.

CHAP-BOOKS.

 

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2537. Old Mr. Dods’ Sayings, and other Chap-books. 1699-1717.
These chapbooks were printed by Robert Sanders.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2538. The Whole Proceedings of Jockey and Maggy, and other Chap-books. 1779-1823.
The chapbooks in this collection were printed by J. & J. Robertson & Co.
2539. The Old Man Outwitted, and other Chap-books. 1799-1809.
These chapbooks were printed by J. & M. Robertson.
—∴—
Lent by Andrew J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
2540. Grogm and other Chap-books. 1800-1838.
The chapbooks in this collection were printed at Glasgow, Paisley, Stirling, Airdrie, Durham, &c.
2541. Auld Robb Morris, and other Chap-books. 1800-1850.
These chapbooks in this collection were printed at Glasgow, Edinburgh, Montrose, &c.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2542. Laugh and be Fat, by Dougal Graham, late Bellman in Glasgow, and other Chap-books. 1823.
These chapbooks were printed at Edinburgh and Kilmarnock.
—∴—
Lent by Andrew J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
2543. Queen Mary’s Lamentation, and other Chap-books. 1823, &c.
2544. The Duke of York, and other Chap-books. 1827, &c.
2545. Chap-books. A Collection. [Various dates.]
2546. True Likeness of that Worthy Poet Robert Burns, and other Chap-books. 1825, &c.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2547. The Laird of Cool’s Ghost. By the Rev. William Ogilvie, minister of Inverwick. [No date.]
This chapbook has gone through many editions.
Mr. Maxwell of Cool died in the year 1724, and shortly afterwards his restless spirit appeared several times to sundry persons, among whom was Mr. Ogilvie. He had some long conversations with it, which  he committed to paper.
—∴—
2548. Gotham in Alarm: a Farce, in three acts, as performed by His Majesty’s Servants at the Theatre Royal, Gotham Square. By an Odd Fellow. Eighth Edition. 1816.
(See No. 2443.)

 

JUVENILE BOOKS.

 

Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Mongomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2549. The History of Master Jackey and Miss Harriott. 1785.
This was printed by J. & M. Robertson.
2550. The Holy Bible Abridged for the Use of Children. 1786.
This was printed by J. & M. Robertson.
—∴—
Lent by C. Campbell, 238 Main Street, Bridgeton.
2551. Lotteries, popularly known as “Dabbities.” Nine Sheets printed in red, green, and blue. [No dates.]
These sheets contain numerous small pictures representing animals and objects of every description, which, when cut separate, were used in a lottery games played by children, and known as “Dabbity,” hence the name. They seem always to have been printed in coloured inks.
—∴—
Lent by James T. Stewart, 79 West Regent Street.
2552. “Dabbities.” A Sheet printed in red. [No date.]
Printed and published by J. Lumsden & Son. (See Nos. 844, 849, 850, 853, 1553, 2551.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2553. A New HIstory of Scotland, from the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time. Adorned with cuts of all the principal Kings and Queens. [No date.]
—∴—
Lent by Andrew J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
2554. Juvenile Books. In Two Volumes. [About 1808.]
These little booklets of the early part of this century were printed and published by J. Lumsden & Son. They were generally illustrated with woodcuts, some of which are said to be by Bewick. A number of them were printed in coloured inks.
—∴—
Lent by A. W. Gray Buchanan, Parkhill, Polmont.
2555. Day (Thomas). The History of Sandford & Merton, for the use of Juvenile Britons. [No date.]
Printed by J. Lumsden & Son.

 

WATER-COLOUR DRAWINGS.

 

Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2556. Figures in the Old Uniforms of the Glasgow Police Force.
2557. Old Glasgow Dresses, Seals, &c.
2558. Old Official Uniforms Seals, &c.
2559. Municipal Dresses, &c.
These original water-colour drawings (Nos. 2556-2559) depict a great variety of city uniforms, dresses, &c.

 

Case O., pp.430-432.

MANUSCRIPTS.

 

Lent by The Most Rev. Archbishop Eyre, LL.D., 6 Bowmont Gardens.
2560. The Protocol book of Cuthbert Simon, Notary Public and Clerk to the Chapter of Glasgow. 1499-1513.
This manuscript was printed for the Grampian Club in 1875.
2561. Rental book of Archbishop James Beaton, 1509 to 1570.
This manuscript was printed for the Grampian Club in 1875. It is the register of the rentallers or kindly tenants of the barony of Glasgow and other baronies belonging to the temporality of the see of Glasgow prior to the Reformation.
—∴—
Lent byWilliam Henry Hill, LL.D., Barlanark, Shettleston.
2562. Epistolarum Apostolicarum Explicatio. In the holograph of Thomas Hutcheson of Lambhill.
This is a manuscript copy of David Dickson’s “Expositio Analytica Omnium Apostolicarum Epistolarum” (No. 2036), published in 1645. Some slight variations indicate that this copy was made prior to the publication of the printed volume. Probably the book represents the Professor’s dictata or lectures, and the MS. is a student’s copy of these. Dickson’s “Brief Exposition of the Gospel according to Matthew” was printed within Hutchesons’ Hospital in 1647.
2563. The Gold book of the Dean of Guild’s House in Glasgow. 1659.
—∴—
Lent by The Kelvingrove Museum.
2564. Archbishop Beaton’s Bible.
On both boards of the volume round the Archiepiscopal Coat of Arms is the inscription “Iacobvs Abetovn. Archiepiscopvs Glasgvensis, 1552. Pereundvm ut vincas.”
—∴—
Lent by The University of Glasgow. 
2565. Solemn League and Covenant, 1643, “Sworne and subcryed by the members and supposts of the Universitie of Glasgow at the Colledge therof, First upon the fyft day of December.” 1643.
With the original signatures. Amongst them are – John Strang, Principal; David Dickson, Professor of Theologie (see No. 2036); Zacharias Boyd, Vice-chancellor (No. 17); E. Wright, Dean of Faculties; Ro. Maine, Professor of Medicine; Robt. Ramsay; Robt. Baillie (see No. 2339); James Dalrymple (then a Regent in the University, afterwards Lord President of the College of Justice, and Viscount of Stair).
—∴—
Lent by The Faculty of Procurators, 62 St. George’s Place.
2566. Minute-book of the Paculty of Procurators. 1668-1759.
—∴—
Lent by Paisley Free Museum.
2567. Inscription on Glass. 1754.
This glass came from an old window opposite the College in High Street.
—∴—
Lent by The Incorporation of Cordiners.
2568. Minute-book of the Deacons’ Court of the Incorporation of Cordiners. 1558-1734.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2569. Diary of George Brown (I.), Merchant in Glasgow and Dean of Guild, 1762, 1763, and 1770, 1771. In Three Volumes. 1746.
These volumes also contain some entries by James Brown, father of the Diarist, dated 1700. (See Nos. 294, 2570.)
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2570. Diary of George Brown, 1745-1753. 1856.
This is a private print of George Brown’s Diary (No. 2569). (See Nos. 394, 2390.)
—∴—
Lent by J. E. R. Senior, 22 Royal Crescent, West.
2571. Autograph Letter from Sir Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde. 7th December, 1855.
—∴—
Lent by Allan Buchanan, Burnsyde, Fairlie.
2572. Journal of a Journey to Arran in 1783, by Charles Hutcheson. 1783.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2573. Portrait of Captain Archibald Patoun. [No date.]
Captain Patoun was the subject of the “Lament,” by Lockhart. “Oh we ne’er shall see the like of Captain Patoun no mo.” He was son of David Patoun, physician in Glasgow. He entered the Dutch military service (Scottish Brigade) in 1765, retired on a pension in 1774, and died on 30th July, 1807. He was nephew of Colonel Archibald Patoun, F.R.S., of the Engineers. (See Nos. 344B, 2574, 2575.)
—∴—
Lent by Mrs. Maxwell, The Cottage, Irvine.
2574. Diary of Captain Archibald Patoun. 1791-1807.
(See No. 2573.)
2575. Private Account-book of Captain Archibald Patoun. 1791-1809.
(See No. 2574.)
—∴—
Lent by E. S. Macharg, C.A., 69 Buchanan Street.
2576. Leaves from the Glasgow Presbytery Records.
These leaves, which relate to the years 1628, 1651, 1664, 1666, and 1709, were saved from the fire which destroyed the Tron Church and Session House, 15th February, 1793.
—∴—
Lent by J. E. R. Senior, 22 Royal Crescent, West.
2577. Autograph Letter from Thomas Campbell, the Poet. 28th May, 1841.
(See Nos. 162, 2578, 2579.)
—∴—
Lent by William Cassells, Cairndhu, Newark Drive, Pollokshields.
2578. Poems by Thomas Campbell.
—∴—
Lent by Andrew J. Kirkpatrick, 5 Park Terrace.
2579. Common-place-book of Thomas Campbell. Holograph.
Part of this manuscript was written after 1815.
—∴—
Lent by John Bryce, 16 Renfield Street.
2580. Kirk Records of the Associate Session of Glasgow. 1763-1781.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2581. Notes of Sermons and Lectures, principally preached at Glasgow. 1693-1702.
These were taken down by John McGilchrist of Easter Possil, writer in Glasgow, who was “very accurate of the shorthand.” Amongst the preachers were Andrew Turner, minister of Erskine; Archibald Wallace, minister of Cardross; Neill Gillies, formerly minister of Cardross, afterwards of Glasgow; John McLaren of Glasgow and John Clark of Glasgow. At the end of the volume are MS. copies of the Dying Testimonies of James Renwick, John Kide, and John King. One of the sermons preached by David Brown at Erskine, on the occasion of the Congregational Fast, 26 November, 1700, occupies 17 closely-written pages. At the end the writer adds: “Night came on and I stopped wryting that the minister could not be followed after farder.”

 

Case P., pp.433-434.

MANUSCRIPTS – continued.

 

Lent by Allan Buchanan, Burnsyde, Fairlie.
2582. Glasgow Sharpshooter’ Right Company Roll. 1819.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2583. Proposals for erecting a Monument to Sir William Wallace in Glasgow, with subscriptions promised. 1818.
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2584. Whistle Binkie, with holograph of Robert Gilfillan, author4 of “O why I left my hame.” 1842.
(See Nos. 2332, 2586, 2588.)
—∴—
Lent by Mrs. Manson, 91 Waterloo Street.
2585. Campbell Club Minute-book. 1st February, 1839, to 6th February, 1845.
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2586. Songs for the Nursery, with holograph original of “Wee Willie Winkie,” by William Miller, &c. 1841.
(See No. 2584.)
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2587. Account of the Barony Parish of Glasgow, by James Hopkirk, with illustrations. 1826.
An interesting and accurate account, beautifully written, and illustrated with drawings in sepia.
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2588. Whistle Binkie, with holograph first and second drafts of “Jeanie Morrison,” by William Motherwell; and Poems by James Ballantine, Alexander MacLaggan, and other writers. 1817-1842.
(See No. 2586.)
—∴—
Lent by The Kelvingrove Museum.
2589. Bridgegate Club Minute-book. Instituted about 1807.
2590. 12th March Club Minute-book. Instituted 1824.
(See Nos. 1556, 1805, 2589, 2594.)
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2591. Autobiogrqaphy of “Hawkie” (William Cameron). Holograph. 1842-1848.
The autobiography of this well-known Glasgow street character was written with his left hand during the time he was an inmate of the Town’s Hospital, and the manuscript sheets were sent from time to time to his friendly patron, David Robertson, bookseller, Trongate. The writing, diction and spelling are characteristic, and the narrative is occasionally more graphic than polite. The manuscript was long preserved as a literary curiosity, being only published in 1888. It is valuable as the veritable autobiography and adventures of a Scottish gangrel. (See Nos. 552A, 2592.)
2592. Hawkie: the Autobiography of a Gangrel. 1888.
This is a printof No. 2591,and was edited by John Tod, “John Strathesk.”
—∴—
Lent by The Barony Parochial Board.
2594. Bridgegate Club, Letters, Invitations, &c.
(See No. 2589.)
—∴—
Lent by The Kelvingrove Museum.
2595. Glasgow Bridgegate Friendly Club, Minute–book. 1847-1876.
(See No. 1116A.)
—∴—
Miss Brown, Lanfine, Newmilns.
2596. Destruction of Daniel Campbell of Shawfield’s House in Glasgow. Interlocutor.
The Riot which culminated in the burning of the “Shawfield Mansion” took place in 1725. (See Nos. 606, 2373.)
—∴—
Lent by Thomas Davidson, Junior, 5 Spring Gardens, Kelvinside.
2597. Glasgow Reform Association Minute-book. 1830-1832.
This book contains the signatures of Colin Dunlop, James Oswald, Thomas Davidson, Charles Tennant, and other well-known Glasgow men of the day.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of trhe MItchell Library, Glasgow.
2598. Poems by James Macfarlan. Holograph. [1842-1852.]
Macfarlan was a poet, and a constant contributor to the columns of the Citizen, the Daily Bulletin, and other Glasgow newspapers of the day. His poems, which had been published in various small paper-covered pamphlets, were collected after his death under the editorship of Colin Rae Brown.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2599. Commonplace-book, written by Walter Peter, 1695, and Margaret Alexander, 1730. 1695-1730.
2600. Poems by William Glen. Holograph. [about 1820.]
The author, who was born in Queen Street, Glasgow, in 1789, and died in Glasgow, in 1826, is best known as the author of “Wae’s me for Prince Charlie.” The first edition of his poems, in 1815 (No. 2312), was sold off in the course of a few months, and is now scarce. A new edition appeared in 1874, under the editorship of Dr. Charles Rogers.

 

Case Q., pp.435-437.

MANUSCRIPTS – continued.

 

Lent by Miss Brown, Lanfine, Newmilns.
2601. An Account of the Expenses at Mrs. Hamilton’s Funeral. 24th August, 1704.
2602. Demand by Prince Charles for Baggage, Horses, Money, and other materials. 8th October, 1745.
2603. Letter from the Duke of Montrose to George Bogle. Gleg, 7th February, 1737.
—∴—
Lent by J. E. R. Senior, 22 Royal Crescent, West.
2604. Letter from Sir E. Bulwer [Lytton]. [London], 10th June, 1841.
2605. Letter from Sir Rowland Hill. General Post Office, 21st July, 1847.
2606. Letter from Thomas Campbell, the Poet. London, 15th May, 1841.
(See No. 2577.)
2607. Letter from the Earl of Eglinton. [Dublin], 1st September, 1858.
2608. Letter from Joseph Hume, M.P. [London], 5th June, 1841.
2609. Letter from the Duke of Wellington. London, 15th May, 1841.
2610. Letter from Sir Charles Napier. 24th May, 1847.
—∴—
Lent by Walter McAdam, R.S.W., 175 Berkeley Street.
2611. Two Letters from Louis Kossuth to John McAdam. 17th June, 1859.
2612. Letter from John Bright to John McAdam. [London], 18th April, 1858.
2613. Letter from Joseph Mazzini to John McAdam. 2nd May, 1857.
2614. Letter from General Garibaldi to John McAdam, and Translation. Caprera, 31st December, 1860.
2615. Letter from General Garibaldi, and Translation. Caprera, August, 1863.
—∴—
Lent by Henry Macdowall, Garthland, Lochwinnoch.
2616. Demand on Glasgow for Money by Prince Charles Edward to the Magistrates of Glasgow. Lockie, 13th September, 1745.
—∴—
J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2617. Agreement among the Principal Inhabitants of Glasgow to make Terms with the Rebels to prevent the City being plundered. Glasgow, September, 1745.
2618. Letter from Donald Cameron of Lochiel to Provost Cochrane. Edinburgh, 11th October, 1745.
2619. Letter fro Colonel Hay, the Prince’s aide-de-camp, to Provost Cochrane, regarding the money levied upon Glasgow. Edinburgh, 18th October, 1745.
2620. Letter from the Earl of Perth to Provost Cochrane, asking safe conduct for Mr. Lockhart, who has orders to enlist young men. Edinburgh, 24th October, 1745.
2621. Letter from the Earl of Glencairn to Provost Cochrane stating that the Rebels were in full moarch towards Scotland. Stirling, 17th December, 1745.
2622. Letter from Major-General Campbell to Provost Cochrane regarding movements of the King’s troops. Inverary, 22nd December, 1745.
2623. Letter from Lord George Murray to Provost, Magistrates, and Town Council of Glasgow announcing the entry of “a parte if not the whole of his Highness Armie… tomorow.” Hamilton, 27th December, 1745.
2624. A Requirement by Major-General Campbell to the Provost of Glagow to deliver up Rebels, Arms, &c., left in Glasgow. Inverary, 9th January, 1745-6.
2625. Letter from Colonel Hay to Provost COchrane as to H.R.H.’s demands on Glasgow. Bannockburn, 21st Jan., 1746.
2626. Letter from Earl Crawfurd to Provost Cochrane stating he will carry out whatever the Duke of Cumberland resolves upon. Perth, March 14, 1746.
2627. Letter from Dr. Moore, father of Sir John Moore, to Peter Murdoch (see Nos. 172, 504.) [No place, nor date.]
2628. Letter from Sir John Moore to Miss Murdoch. Sandgate, 8th January, 1804.
2629. Petition from Rev. William Thom of Govan (see No. 2115) to the J.P.s of Lanarkshire. [Govan, no date.]
2630. Letter from Pollok of that Ilk to Dr. Brisbane. Pollok, 8th March, 1734.
2631. Letter from Sheriff Cross (No. 66) to Peter Murdoch. [No place, nor date.]
2632. Letter from Joanna Baillie (No. 495) to Miss Murdoch. Hampstead, January 28th, 1841.
This letter refers to the authoress’s well-known song of “Woo’d and married and a’.”
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2633. Two Letters from Charles Dickens to A. S. Dalglish. 12th June and 21st June, 1848.
These letters relate to the arrangements for the Readings given by Dickens in Glasgow in June, 1848.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2634. Letter from the Archbishop of GLasgow to the Duchess of Lauderdale. Edinburgh, 3rd July, 1678.
2635. Original Warrant by the Privy Council to the Earl of Linlithgow for the quartering of the “Highland Host” in Glasgow and neighbourhood. 20th January, 1678.
2636. Letter from William Hamilton of Gilbertfield to Provost Peter Murdoch (No. 49). Letrickhall, 14th Oct., 1730.
—∴—
Lent by George Gray, Blairtum Park, Rutherglen.
2637. Analysis of the Language of the Bechuanas, by Dr. David Livingstone.
This is a presentation copy to the late Rev. Norman Macleod, D.D., with an inscription from the author.
—∴—
Lent by William Young, Stanhill Court, Charlwood, Surrey.
2638. Select Collection of Songs composed by the Best Masters.
“William Kirkpatrick, His Musick Book 1760.” With musical accompaniments. (See Nos. 481, 976981.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Napier, M.D., 15 Queen Mary Avenue, Crosshill.
2638A. Certificate for 1/16th share in the first Glasgow Lottery for the London-Street Improvements.

 

Case R., pp.438-444.

PERIODICALS AND SERIALS.

 

_20180325_235353_20180325_235442

Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2639. The Glasgow Courant. Containing the Occurences Both at Home and Abroad.
Nos. 1 to 67, November, 11-14, 1715, to April 28-May 1, 1716.
Printed for R. T. & R. Johnston. With No. 4 the title was changed to “The West-Country Intelligence, containing the News,” &c. Printed and are to be sold by Robert Johnston. This is the earliest Glasgow newspaper. Its size is a small quarto.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2640. The GLasgow-Weekly-History, Relating to the Late Progress of the Gospel, At Home and Abroad. [November, 1741, to Decmber,1 742.]
Printed by William Duncan. The title-page has as date 1743.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2641. An Exhortation to the Inhabitants of the South Parish of Glasgow [by John Gillies, minister]. No. 1, September 26, 1750, to No. 21, November 9, 1751.
Printed and sold by John Orr.
—∴—
Lent by James J. MacLehose, M.A., 61 St. Vincent Street.
2642. The GLasgow United Magazine; or Weekly Instructor. No. 4, 4th August, 1773.
Printed by Alexander Adam in the Gallowgate, for John Brown, Bookseller.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of The Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2643. The Glasgow Universal Magazine of Knowledge and PLeasure. Vol. I. August 13th [12th?], 1772, to February 3rd, 1773.
This copy, like various others, wants the title-page, and the numbers have no printer’s nor publisher’s name.
2644. The Glasgow Museum, or Weekly Instructor. Vols. I.-II. 11th January to 10th July, 1773.
Printed by Alexander Adam.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2645. The Polyhymnia: Poetry, Original and Selected. By a Society of Gentleman. [Vol. I.] Nos. 1 to 20 (no dates), [about 1799.]
Printed for and sold by John Murdoch. (See No. 2292.)
2646. The Glasgow Magazine and Review; or Universal Miscellany. Vol. I. No. 1, October, 1783, to No. 8, May, 1784.
Printed for J. Mennons, publisher of the “Glasgow Advertiser.” Each number has an engraving by D. Lizars, Edinburgh.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2647. Verity; or, Facts and Queries, humbly submitted to the consideration of all impartial persons. No. 1, February —, adn No. 2, February 21st, 1785.
Has no printer’s nor publisher’s name.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2648. The Weekly Miscellany of Instruction and Entertainment. Vol. I. No. 1, 25th June, to No. 26, 16th December, 1789.
Printed by William Bell.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2649. The Phoenix: or Weekly Miscellany Improved. Vols. I.-IV. No. 1, 4th July, 1792, to No. 104, 2nd July, 1794.
Printed and sold by William Bell.
—∴—
David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2650. The Asylum, or Weekly Miscellany. Vol. I. No. 1, 30th July, to No. 26 [no date], 1794.
Printed by William Bell. This and the two preceding entries (Nos. 26482650) appear to be portions of a consecutive series issued by William Bell.
2651. The Glasgow Magazine. Vol. I. June to December, 1795.
Printed by Ebenezer Miller. This magazine was edited by William Marshall, writer, Glasgow.
2652. The Culler. Vol. I. No. 1, 12th August, to No. 20, 23rd December, 1795.
Printed for A. Cameron.
2653. The Torch, or Glasgow Museum. No. 1, January 13, to No. 5, March 10, 1796.
The numbers bear no printer’s nor publisher’s names.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2654. The Young Misses Magazine, containing Dialogues between a Governess, and several young ladies, her scholars. Vol. II. 1800.
Printed by James Mundell, University printer. Notwithstanding the name it is doubtfully a periodical.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2655. The Glasgow Theatrical Register. Part III., No. 1, May 12, to No. 12, July 14, 1804; Part IV., No. 1, May 1, to No. 12, July 25, 1805.
Part III. printed by W. Allan; Part IV., by Crawford & McKenzie.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2656. The Glasgow Theatrical Register. Part IV., May 1 to July 25, 1805.
Printed by Crawford & McKenzie. This is a duplicate of Part IV. of No. 2655.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2657. The Selector; containing Pieces Moral, Literary, and Humorous. Vols. I.-IV.
Printed by D. McKenzie. Published fortnightly; but the numbers have no indications of extent or date.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2658. The Glasgow Magazine, and Clydesdale Monthly Register. Vols. I.-III. No. 1, September, 1810, to No. 18, July, 1812.
Printed by Mennons & Co., Tontine Buildings, Exchange.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2659. The Druid: a Series of Miscellaneous Essays. Vol. I. No. 1 to No. 21 (no dates), 1812.
Printed by Robert Chapman. It is doubtful is this was published in periodical form.
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2660. The Scotchman. No. 1 to No. 3 (no dates), [July, 1812.]
Prentit by S. & A. Young, Paslay. Communikaishons may be direkit to Robert Hutchison, Beukseller, Saut-market, Glasco.
2661. The Talisman, consisting chiefly of Original Pieces, in Verse and Prose. No. 1 (no date), 1812.
Printed by N. Douglas & Co. for the Editor.
2662. Specimens of English Poetry, during the years 1811, 1812, and part of 1813. [Selected] by Walter Paterson. Part I. (no date), 1813.
Printed in the Glasgow Chronicle office, and probably taken from the columns of that paper.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2663. The Vehicle of Free Inquiry; or Monthly Medium of Impartial Discussion. Vol. I. No. 1, May 14th, 1812, to No. 12, April 15th, 1813.
Printed and sold by N. Douglas & Co. Has engraved portrait of N. Douglas, Preacher of Restoration. (See No. 2388.)
—∴—
Lent by J. Barclay Murdoch, Capelrig, Newton-Mearns.
2664. Thaumaturgus; or, the Wonders of the Magis Lantern; exhibiting the Distresses of the Country and some of the consequences of the late just… war. Parts I. to IV. (no dates), 1816-1817.
Part I. printed by A. Napier; Part II. by W. Falconer; Part III. by A. Napier; and Part IV. (title, “The Magic Lantern”), by J. Neilson (Paisley).
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2665. Thaumaturgus; or, the Wonders of the Magic Lantern; exhibiting the Distresses of the Country, etc. 1816.
(A duplicate of No. 2664).
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2666. The Tribunal. No. 1, June 8, to No. 6, November 16, 1816.
Printed by W. Lang, and published by D. Porter.
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2667. Attic Stories, or the Opinions of Edward Hazelrig, Esq. Second edition. No. 1, 31st January, 1817, to No. 26, 2nd January, 1818.
Printed by James Hedderwick. This work takes its name from the fact that it was written in an attic. In the present copy the names of the writers are noted. They were, chiefly, Andrew Crawford, Robert Young, and James Brown.
2668. The Student: a Periodical Paper, consisting of Essays on Literature and Morality. No. 1, January 18, to No. 20, May 31, 1817.
Printed by R. Chapman, and published by William Turnbull (No. 402A). This magazine contains a long note on Dr. William Richardson, Professor of Humanity in the University, and an author of repute.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2669. The Clydesdale Magazine. No. 1, May, to No. 8, December, 1818.
Printed by W. M. Borthwick & Co., Lanark.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2670. The Protestant; a Weekly Paper, on the principal points of controversy between the Church of Rome and the Reformed. Vols. I.-IV. No. 1, July 18th, 1818, to No. 208, July 6, 1822.
Printed by Andrew & John M. Duncan, and published by Wardlaw & Cunninghame. There were many subsequent editions. The sixth was published by Khull, Blackie & Co., and the twelfth by Blackie & Son. It was edited, and largely written, by William McGavin.
2671. The Wanderer, a Thing of Shreds and Patches. By Peregrine Picnic, Gent. No. 1, 4th April, 1818, to No. 21, 9th January, 1819.
Printed by James Hedderwick for Reid & Henderson.
2672. The British Magazine and Periodical Gleaner; or Depository for Hints and Suggestions calculated to promote the Happiness and Comfort of Man. Vol. I. No. 1, October, 1818, to No. 10, July, 1819.
Printed by James Hedderwick, and published by Charles Johnston & Co.
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2673. The Reformer. No. 1, 3rd November, to No. 5, 1st December, 1819.
Printed by Young, Gallie & Co., 150 Trongate.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2674. The Spirit of the Union. Vol. I. No. 1, October 30th, 1819, to No. 11, January 8, 1820.
Printed by G. McLeod & Co. for the Editor, at W. Carse’s Printing Office, 127 Trongate.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2675. The Christian Recorder, and British and Foreign Religious Intelligencer. Vol. I. No. 1, January, to No. 12, December, 1821.
Printed by R. Chapman, and published by Jackson & Orr.
—∴—
Lent by David Robertson, 12 Windsor Circus.
2676. The Enquirer, a Periodical Work, published in Glasgow. No. 1, October 11th, 1820, to No. 16, May 9th, 1821.
Printed by Andrew & John M. Duncan, and published by Wardlaw & Cunninghame. Edited by Dr. James Maconechy (No. 348), editor of the “Glasgow Courier.” (See No. 2410.)
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2677. The Literary Melange; or Weekly Register of Literature and the Arts. No. 1, 19th June, to No. 26, 25th December, 1822. No. 1 [New Series], 1st January, to No. 5, 29th January, 1823.
Nos. 1 to 14 printed and published by William Tait & Co,; Nos. 15 to 26 printed, published and sold, by George Purvis & Co., successors to W. Tait; Nos. 1 to 5, New Series, printed and published by Purvis & Aitken.
—∴—
Lent by William James Fleming, M.D., 3 Woodside Terrace.
2678. The Literary Reporter, or Weekly Miscellany. Vol. I. No. 1, 2nd November, 1822, to No. 26, 26th April, 1823.
Printed and published by John Graham & Co.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2679. The Glasgow Theatrical Observer. Volume First. No. 1, 20th April, to No. 15, 28th October, 1824.
Nos. 1 to 6 printed by John Graham & Co.; No. 7 on, printed by J. Curll; and all published by W. R. McPhun.
2680. The John Knox, or Religious Reformer of Scotland. No. 1, March 20, to No. 7, May 1, 1824.
Printed by —— Malcolm, and published by Robertson & Atkinson, successors to W. Turnbull.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2681. The Rush Light, First Series. No. 1, 13th March, to No. 10, 15th May, 1824.
Printed by J. Starke. “Timothy Purblind, Gent., to the Reader.”
—∴—
Lent by David Murray, LL.D., Moorepark, Cardross.
2682. The Western Luminary, or Glasgow Literary and Scientific Gazette. No. 1, January 3, to No. 10, March 6, 1824.
Nos. 1 to 10 printed by James Hedderwick; Nos. 11 to 26 printed by R. Malcolm; and all published at the Free Press Office.
—∴—
Lent by Alexander Macdonald, 9 Montgomerie Drive, Kelvinside.
2683. McPhun’s Glasgow Magazine. Vol. I. No. 1, November, 1824, to No. 4, February, 1825.
Printed by James Curll.
2684. The Conjuror. A Weekly Publication. No. 1, 22nd October, 1825, to No. 16, 4th February, 1826.
No Printer’s name; published by James Watt & Company.
—∴—
Lent by The Trustees of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow.
2685. The Literary Coronal, for 1825-6. [Third Volume.] 1825.
No printer’s name; printed for Richard Griffin & Co. Published annually.

 

Case S., pp.444-449.

[No Illustrations for this Section]

Case T., pp.449-453.

[No Illustrations for this Section]

Case U., pp.454-459.

[No Illustrations for this Section]

4 thoughts on “Gallery No. 1.

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