‘Old and New Edinburgh’ (1880)

I can’t recommend this set enough. James Grant has such an easy-to-read writing style and must have gleaned his information from all the nooks and crannies where the histories tends to end up to have obtained even half the information he has. The illustrations are beautiful and have been reproduced as well as possible for Random Scottish History visitors.

 

Old and New Edinburgh Spines

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1 & 3, Cassell & Company, Limited. and 1-3, Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Spines.

Old and New Edinburgh Cover 2

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1 & 3, Cassell & Company, Limited., Front Cover.

Old and New Edinburgh Inside Front Cover

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1 & 3, Cassell & Company, Limited., Inside Front Cover.
Thanks to the original owner of these books we have the first additional snippet. This one regarding the famous Edinburgh “Body-snatchers” and murderers, Burke & Hare. William Burke was hanged for the crimes but, as noted in this excerpt, William Hare “turned King’s evidence” against his partner-in-crime and was freed to live quite the pathetic life after apparently becoming blind in a lime-pit after his colleagues found out who he was.

Old and New Edinburgh Additional 1a

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1 & 3, Cassell & Company, Limited., Front Flyleaf.
The second additional piece of information added by the previous owner is this letter from a D. Guthrie with regards the whereabouts of “the skulls of Darnley and the Regent Morton”. The handwritten note at the bottom suggests “[Darnley’s] skull was blown up in London blitz.” It then goes one to describe the “grisly relics” in the Anatomical Museum, Teviot Place, within the Medical School Building of Edinburgh University; the “Casts of 1. Skull of Robert the Bruce, and2. of mummified head of the Earl of Bothwell, [last & most controversial] husband of Mary, Queen of Scots.
Mummified (and petrified) heart of William the Lion, King of Scotland, 1536-78.
Skull of [Scottish historian and scholar] George Buchanan, 1506-82.
Also, of course, such well known relics as the Black Dwarf’s bones, and the skeleton of William Burke.”

Old and New Edinburgh Additional 2

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vol.1, Cassell & Company, Limited, Front Flyleaf (reverse).
The third and last additional article to the book is this newspaper clipping from the Scottish Sunday Express, April 29, 1936 that runs with the headline:
“The baby king tale is banned – BY WHITEHALL
EDINBURGH CASTLE guides must not tell the “coffin in the wall” story to tourists. The Ministry of Works has banned it.”
The story gave fuel to a conspiracy tale of Queen Mary’s son James the VI. of Scotland having died shortly after birth and swapped with the Countess of Mar’s son.

Newspaper Clipping Found in Book

Newspaper article found between the pages of ‘Old and New Edinburgh’, Jamess Grant (1880), vol.1, Cassell & Company. (Newspaper & Edition Unknown).

Old and New Edinburgh Publishers Page 2

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1 & 3, Cassell & Company, Limited., Publisher’s Page.

Old and New Edinburgh Cover

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1-3, Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Front Cover.

Old and New Edinburgh Back Cover

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1-3, Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Back Cover.

Old and New Edinburgh Publisher's Page

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vols.1-3, Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Publisher’s Page.

Old and New Edinburgh St Cuthberts

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vol.1, “The Old Church of St. Cuthbert’s, and the North Loch. (After Clerk of Eldin).” opposite Publisher’s Page.

Old and New Edinburgh Keys

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vol.1, “Keys of the City of Edinburgh.”, p.ix.

Old and New Edinburgh Paul's Work

‘Old and New Edinburgh’, James Grant (1880), vol.1, “Paul’s Work. (The room in which Sir Walter Scott corrected his proofs).”, p.xii.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s