Impressions of Some of the Seals of Bishops of Glasgow, pp.163-164.

[Scottish National Memorials Contents]

Lent by Thomas Boston. (Nos. 1163-1172.) 

   JOCELINE, A.D. 11751-1198. A full-length figure of a bishop, in pontifical vestments; his right hand elevated, bestowing the benediction; his left holding the pastoral staff. ‘SIGILLUM JOCELINI GLASGUENSIS EPISCOPI.’ – Figured in Laing’s Ancient Scottish Seals, Plate xv., fig. I. 

(1163) 

   FLORENCE: Bishop-elect 1202; Resigned 1207; Died 1212. This is an interesting design. A figure of a young man seated before a lectern, on which is a book; in his left hand he holds a rod or staff of office; his right hand is a little raised, and the forefinger extended as if he was discoursing from the book before him. ‘SIGILL. FLOREN[TH GLAS]GUENSIS ELECTI.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xv., fig. 3. (See Plate XXII.) 

(1164) 

   WALTER, CHAPLAIN TO WILLIAM THE LION, A.D. 1207-1232. A full-length figure of a bishop in profile, in pontifical vestments, standing upon a crescent reversed, his right hand elevated, and his left holding the pastoral staff. ‘sigil. walteri dei gra. glasguensis epi.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xv., fig. 4. (See Plate XXII.) 

(1165) 

   WILLIAM DE BONDINGTON, A.D. 1232-1258. Counter Seal. A figure of St. Kentigern in pontifical vestments. In his left hand the pastoral staff, and with his right consecrating a bishop, who is kneeling before him. ‘ora pro nobis beate kentigerne.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xv., fig. 5. (See Plate XXII.) 

(1166) 

   ROBERT WISHART, A.D. 1271-1316. This, as well as the Counter Seal following, is an exceedingly interesting and beautiful seal, both as regards the fine design and execution, and the celebrated person to whom it belonged. Very fortunately it is in good preservation. Under a rich Gothic canopy a full-length figure of a bishop in pontifical vestments, his right hand raised and his left holding the pastoral staff, standing on a lion crouching. On each side of the bishop is a head of a Saint in front, crowned with the nimbus, perhaps meant for the heads of St. Kentigern and St. David; below the dexter hand is a bird (raven?), and beneath the sinister one, a fish with a gemmed ring in its mouth. ‘S. ROBERTI DEI GRATIA EPI. GLASGUENSIS.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvi., fig. 1. (See Plate No. XXII.) 

(1167) 

   ROBERT WISHART’S COUNTER SEAL. Equally rich in design, consisting of three compartments. In the upper compartment or niche is a monk presenting to St. Kentigern the fish with the jewelled ring in its mouth, which by his command had been caught in the Clyde in support of the honour of Queen Languoreth. In the middle compartment of the Seal are two niches. In the dexter a figure with a sword in his right hand. In the sinister niche a figure of the Queen holding a ring in her right hand. In the lower part of the Seal, within a niche, is a figure of a bishop kneeling at prayer, and on each side are heads of Saints, similar to those in the last. The inscription on this fine Seal is rather imperfect, but has evidently been ‘REX • FURIT • HEC • PLORAT • PATET • AURUM • DUM • SACER • ORAT.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvi., fig. I. (See Plate XXII.) 

(1168) 

   ROBERT WISHART (the same person). Not so richly designed as the last, but exceedingly well executed. A full-length figure of a bishop as before. At the dexter side a bird on a branch of ivy, and at the sinister the fish and ring. In the lower part of the Seal is a small head of an animal, apparently a wolf, ‘S. ROBERTI WYSCHARD DEI GRA EPISCOPI GLASGUENSIS.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvii., fig. I. 

(1169) 

   JOHN WISHART, A.D. 1318-1326. Very much defaced. It appears to have been a very rich design. A figure of a bishop in a niche with a canopy, and in the lower part a figure of a bishop kneeling at prayer. On the dexter side is a shield charged with the arms of Scotland, and on the sinister side is another, but so defaced that the bearings cannot be distinguished. ‘SIGILLUM JOHANNIS DEI GR[A. EPI.] GLASGUENSIS.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvi., fig. 3. 

(1170) 

   JOHN LINDSAY, A.D. 1326-1335. Beneath a Gothic canopy a figure of a bishop, as in the last; above the right hand appears a mullet. On the dexter side is a shield, bearing ermine three bars (?). Above the shield is a fish with a ring in its mouth. On the sinister side is also a shield bearing an orle vairé, surmounted with a bend, and above the shield is a bird. ‘S. JOHIS DEI GRA. EPI. GLASGUEN. AD. CAS.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvi., fig. 4. 

(1171) 

   ANDREW MUIRHEAD, A.D. 1454-1473. A very pretty design of a Gothic niche, with canopy and open tabernacle work at sides. A figure of St. Kentigern, with the nimbus, in pontifical vestments, holding in his right hand a fish with a ring in its mouth, and in his left the pastoral staff: in the open space of the screen-work at the sides is a fish with ring in its mouth. In the lower part of the Seal is a shield, bearing on a bend three acorns, the coat of Muirhead. ‘SIGILLUM ANDREE EPI. GLASGUENSIS.’ – Laing’s Seals, Plate xvi., fig. 5. 

(1172) 

——————————————— 

   SEAL OF JOHN PATERSON, the last Archbishop of Glasgow under the prelacy, who died in Edinburgh in 1708. After being Dean of Edinburgh, he was in 1674 elevated to the See of Galloway, whence in 1679 he was translated to Edinburgh, and in 1687 he was promoted to the Archbishopric of Glasgow, which he continued to hold for the brief space till the abolition of the Scottish Episcopate was decreed. Archbishop Paterson was the last survivor of the ecclesiastical hierarchy in Scotland. The seal has been in the possession of the Paterson family ever since, and it is now the property of John Paterson, Esq., Irvine. 

(926) Lent by TOWN COUNCIL OF IRVINE PER JAMES DICKIE. 

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